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  • Posts

    • I am a first year applicant after taking a year to take classes to raise my GPA and prove that I have the capacity to perform at a level higher than represented by my cumulative GPA. I currently work in as an ER Tech in a rural emergency room (Healthcare Provider Shortage Area) and am active in volunteering in my local community. I am curious if taking a position outside of the PCE field would be a detriment to the long path ahead of me in becoming a PA. I was curious if I had or would be approaching a point where my PCE is high enough where additional hours would be negligible. My stats are as follows and I continue to take classes to improve my GPA's and prepare me for my future as a PA. I am aware the road will likely be long and appreciate any assistance you can provide into steps you think would be beneficial to my future aspirations in becoming a PA. All stats and figures below are at time of application submission in early June. Since this time I have taken additional classes, continued to work in the emergency room, and responded to 3 natural disaster incidents (Search and Rescue as well as Repair for those impacted) for an additional 200 hours of community service.   PCE: 5,886 Hours at time of Application ED Tech- 3410 EMT E-911 3410 Chicago- 2288, Medical Bay Captain Marathon- 44 Hours, EMT Major Music Festival and Events 144 Hours HCE: 360 AHA CPR Instructor (Physicians, Nurses, First Responders, and Police) 120, EMT-B Instructor 240 Shadowing: 548 448 Hours Shadowing PA's (Ortho, ED, FP, and Hospital Med.) My hospital allows me to shadow (8 hours) weekly as part of my compensation. 100 Hours MD. (ED, Gen Surg, Ortho, Infectious Disease) Volunteering: 3500 Hours 2000 Volunteering local youth center tutoring and mentoring low income families 1500 Teaching Health education to high risk high school freshman in Chicago. Cum. GPA: 3.09 Science GPA: 3.03 Last 60: 3.91 Pre-req Classes: Biology 1- A , Biology 2-A, Genetics- B,MicroBio- B, A&P 1 B, A&P 2 w/ Honors A, Chem 1- B, Chem 2-B, Orgo 1- A, Stats-B, Pysch- A, Med term A.  
    • I liked the book Minor Emergencies: Splinters to Fractures.   HippoEd's UC RAP is a good resource as well.
    • I just switched into Urgent Care. I have 1 year of hospital medicine under my belt. I find myself getting stumped on some occasions, simply because I would treat the issue differently inpatient.  Since I am feeling the learning curve, I am interested in what resources (books, journals, sites, etc.) my fellow PAs in UC use on a daily basis? All suggestions are helpful! Thanks in advance 😀  
    • What a terrible way to start out in the profession. I'm sorry this happened but rest assured the good employer and physicians are out there. How do you Move forward? I have found that when I am feeling whipped down just making a plan of some kind and moving forward on it helps a lot. Feeling helpless is awful. How do you make sure your next job isn't just as terrible? You are now wiser than you were a year ago. The life lessons I remember the most are the ones where I did or didn't do something and it had a bad outcome of some kind. It happened to you. It happens to all of us. Use this as best you can. Review your hiring process and thought processes during the time you interviewed and see where you can do better next time. Did you ask hard but pertinent questions? Patient load and mix. Expectations on call and coverage. Things of that nature. Did you get to talk to some of the PAs who were already there? When I interviewed for my current position the medical director took me to a room full of current APPs and said "ask them anything you'd like to. I'll be in my office when you are done." Recovering from burnout varies from person to person. Don't be afraid to seek professional help and counseling. Ask older, more experienced PAs for advice. What do you tell future employers as you look for work? This is a hard one because it is a balancing act. You need to explain what happened without sounding like a victim or like you are just blaming your former employer. You are...but they don't want to hear it except in broad terms. Keep it general unless they ask for specifics and then keep it as close to neutral as you can. Practice what you might say ahead of time and polish the message so you aren't unprepared when the question is asked. Lastly, and I have made this recommendation before, spend the money to consult a labor lawyer. Protect yourself and your future employment. It sounds like you are dealing with some bad people and they may do you harm if they think they can. A few hundred bucks spent on an attorney and a letter from said attorney cautioning them about what they might or might not say about you will be money well spent.   Good luck.
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