Jump to content

CVS not accepting PA prescriptions?


Recommended Posts

My MA got a call from CVS asking for confirmation from MD for a prescription of ibuprofen. She was kind of surprised as my prescriptions were never a problem before. She asked what the problem is, it's not even a controlled substance, etc. The person said CVS has a new rule that any PA prescriptions need to be approved by physician. Then the next day management was asking me if I'd heard anything like that as they heard it from another source.

Is this only in California? Nationwide? Should I just tell my patients to go to another pharmacy? This would cause a ridiculous amount of work for staff if this is the case.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderator
2 hours ago, AbeTheBabe said:

My MA got a call from CVS asking for confirmation from MD for a prescription of ibuprofen. She was kind of surprised as my prescriptions were never a problem before. She asked what the problem is, it's not even a controlled substance, etc. The person said CVS has a new rule that any PA prescriptions need to be approved by physician. Then the next day management was asking me if I'd heard anything like that as they heard it from another source.

Is this only in California? Nationwide? Should I just tell my patients to go to another pharmacy? This would cause a ridiculous amount of work for staff if this is the case.

there is a current thread about this on the huddle. One PA dealt with it by asking to talk to local pharmacists and regional and told them she would be directing 400 pts/week elsewhere. they fixed it.

here is the post: I once sent a letter to corporate CVS when a pharmacist refused to fill a PA rx . The letter was along the lines of- my patient had difficulty filling a rx  I wrote that was clearly within my prescribing privileges and state law, it was such a hassle she ended up going to Walgreens down the street at which time the rx was promptly filled. I alone see 400 patients a month, prescribing multiple medications to my patients daily, add the 125,000 PAs in this country, or XXXX number practicing locally each writing multiple rx  daily I was surprised that CVS would refuse and PA rx .  The law states...... My office would like to continue to use CVS, however, if there is a problem or call back with every rx  written we will be forced to direct our patients elsewhere. Within a week I received an apology call from corporate, the store pharmacist and a written letter of apology. Those numbers = $$$.

https://huddle.aapa.org/communities/community-home/digestviewer/viewthread?GroupId=31&MessageKey=71e4d6be-a60d-4526-95aa-ea9ddb23d72c&CommunityKey=e54b07fe-0e40-4c0c-a8e4-25d744d979b5&tab=digestviewer&ReturnUrl=%2fbrowse%2fallrecentposts

If they refuse to change the policy inform your local CVS that all patients from your office seen by an MD or PA will have their rxs filled elsewhere. Start writing may not fill at CVS directly on the RX.

  • Upvote 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, EMEDPA said:

there is a current thread about this on the huddle. One PA dealt with it by asking to talk to local pharmacists and regional and told them she would be directing 400 pts/week elsewhere. they fixed it.

here is the post: I once sent a letter to corporate CVS when a pharmacist refused to fill a PA rx . The letter was along the lines of- my patient had difficulty filling a rx  I wrote that was clearly within my prescribing privileges and state law, it was such a hassle she ended up going to Walgreens down the street at which time the rx was promptly filled. I alone see 400 patients a month, prescribing multiple medications to my patients daily, add the 125,000 PAs in this country, or XXXX number practicing locally each writing multiple rx  daily I was surprised that CVS would refuse and PA rx .  The law states...... My office would like to continue to use CVS, however, if there is a problem or call back with every rx  written we will be forced to direct our patients elsewhere. Within a week I received an apology call from corporate, the store pharmacist and a written letter of apology. Those numbers = $$$.

https://huddle.aapa.org/communities/community-home/digestviewer/viewthread?GroupId=31&MessageKey=71e4d6be-a60d-4526-95aa-ea9ddb23d72c&CommunityKey=e54b07fe-0e40-4c0c-a8e4-25d744d979b5&tab=digestviewer&ReturnUrl=%2fbrowse%2fallrecentposts

If they refuse to change the policy inform your local CVS that all patients from your office seen by an MD or PA will have their rxs filled elsewhere. Start writing may not fill at CVS directly on the RX.

Yes basically threatening to send patients elsewhere is the only way to deal with this. There's like 20 PAs and 50 MDs in my group so hopefully that will get them to reconsider. I send most prescriptions electronically so I will just find the nearest non CVS pharmacy for the patient until they change their ways.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've also started just printing my Rx.'s since Cerner seems to recently been having issues getting them to the correct pharmacy.  At that point it's between the patient and the pharmacy.  I'm tired of the silly calls/faxes from pharm. techs asking if they can substitute Proventil in lieu of albuterol when it isn't written as "dispense as written", or "we don't have that in stock right now, would you like to change it".  How about just give them back the prescription and they can take it elsewhere or else get it from the location two blocks away on another street.  If I catch wind of this locally then I'll tell the patient's the same.  Bypass CVS.

Now, GET OFF MY LAWN, and a Happy Thanksgiving to all!

Edited by GetMeOuttaThisMess
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderator

I would like to see AAPA send a legal notice to their corporate board threatening a restraint of trade suit over this. This is well within their wheelhouse. I sent an email to someone who can probably make this happen and/or organize a nationwide boycott of CVS by 120,000 PAs and their SPs.

  • Like 4
  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Get this.  I recently discharged a patient with a script for Carafate.  A notice came back to me the same day that the pharmacist would not fill it, and told the patient he would be better off with a PPI.  I went ballistic on the pharmacist pointing how dumb he was in regards to PPI therapy, and told him "I write the prescriptions, you fill them as written."  It's amazing how pharmacist don't understand the nature in which these drugs actually work, or their side effects.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had this problem once with 1 prescription. I reported the pharmacist to the office of the professions and i complained to the regional manager of the pharmacy, never had an issue since. was i over zealous? No, pharmacists should be educated on whom has prescription privileges prior to licensingand employment, i aint got no times for this nonsense

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderator
25 minutes ago, JMPA said:

I had this problem once with 1 prescription. I reported the pharmacist to the office of the professions and i complained to the regional manager of the pharmacy, never had an issue since. was i over zealous? No, pharmacists should be educated on whom has prescription privileges prior to licensingand employment, i aint got no times for this nonsense

agree. we have already fought this battle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderator

I have stopped sending any patients to CVS

 

As a family member of a patient they told me "we are not answering our phone we are to busy and central office will not hire anyone"  

I was there for a home bound senior whom relies on the phone

After pointing this out to the Tech ringing me out she chastised me - highly unprofessional.

I spoke to the the pharmacist and he agreed with her  only then did I state I was a local prescriber and that I would NEVER send a patient their again until they improved.  

I have also placed a phone call to the state board of pharmacy for this same issue - you can not simply decide to not answer the phone when this is a way home bound seniors call in scripts (literally I called all day and let it ring almost a 1/2 hour each time)

 

 

As for them not filling your script - start politely, then tell them in no certain conditions that you have STATE LAW behind you and if they are refusing to fill a legal script that you WILL complain to the board of pharmacy - make sure you get their name and title BEFORE you do this so they know you have their info...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is the email I got from CAPA today:

 

CVS Prescriptions ALERT

Robert Miller, PA, Professional Practice Committee Chair; Treasurer; Past President

 

It has come to our attention that many CVS pharmacies have been refusing to fill prescriptions submitted by PAs in California when the prescription does not include the name of the supervising physician on the form. In addition, some have also required the physician’s DEA# and NPI. We are contacting CVS to determine the scope of this policy.

 

THE REQUIREMENT TO INCLUDE THE PHYSICIAN NAME ON A PRESCRIPTION IS NOT NEW. This requirement has been in place since 1994. Be aware that the California PA Practice Act, excerpt from B&P Code § 3502.1, does clearly state that:

 

(d) A written drug order issued pursuant to subdivision (a), except a written drug order in a patient’s medical record in a health facility or medical practice, shall contain the printed name, address, and telephone number of the supervising physician and surgeon, the printed or stamped name and license number of the physician assistant, and the signature of the physician assistant. Further, a written drug order for a controlled substance, except a written drug order in a patient’s medical record in a health facility or a medical practice, shall include the federal controlled substances registration number of the physician assistant and shall otherwise comply with Section 11162.1 of the Health and Safety Code.

 

(Entire B&P Code § 3502.1 is below)

 

The above statute requires the physician name, address and phone number to be included in a prescription submitted by a PA but does not specifically require the physician’s DEA# or NPI.

 

Problems arise with e-prescribing when you are unable to add the required information on the prescription. It may be related to limitations in EHR system designs where there is no ability to add the physician name or other identifiers onto a prescription along with the PA. You may need to modify your EHR capabilities.

 

In addition, the excerpt below, from the California Health and Safety Code, Uniform Controlled Substances Act, § 11162.1, (referred to above) regarding preprinted prescriptions for controlled substances, states that the prescription form shall contain:

 

(9) The preprinted name, category of licensure, license number, federal controlled substance registration number, and address of the prescribing practitioner.

 

(Entire H&S Code § 11162.1 is below)

 

Also know that “stamping” information as stated in § 3502.1 above is not allowed on controlled substances security preprinted prescription forms

 

BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONS CODE – BPC

DIVISION 2. HEALING ARTS [500 – 4999.129]

( Division 2 enacted by Stats. 1937, Ch. 399. )

 

CHAPTER 7.7. Physician Assistants [3500 – 3546]

( Heading of Chapter 7.7 amended by Stats. 1992, Ch. 427, Sec. 5. )

 

ARTICLE 1. General Provisions [3500 – 3503.5]

( Article 1 added by Stats. 1975, Ch. 634. )

 

3502.1.

 

(a) In addition to the services authorized in the regulations adopted by the Medical Board of California, and except as prohibited by Section 3502, while under the supervision of a licensed physician and surgeon or physicians and surgeons authorized by law to supervise a physician assistant, a physician assistant may administer or provide medication to a patient, or transmit orally, or in writing on a patient’s record or in a drug order, an order to a person who may lawfully furnish the medication or medical device pursuant to subdivisions (c) and (d).

 

(1) A supervising physician and surgeon who delegates authority to issue a drug order to a physician assistant may limit this authority by specifying the manner in which the physician assistant may issue delegated prescriptions.

 

(2) Each supervising physician and surgeon who delegates the authority to issue a drug order to a physician assistant shall first prepare and adopt, or adopt, a written, practice specific, formulary and protocols that specify all criteria for the use of a particular drug or device, and any contraindications for the selection. Protocols for Schedule II controlled substances shall address the diagnosis of illness, injury, or condition for which the Schedule II controlled substance is being administered, provided, or issued. The drugs listed in the protocols shall constitute the formulary and shall include only drugs that are appropriate for use in the type of practice engaged in by the supervising physician and surgeon. When issuing a drug order, the physician assistant is acting on behalf of and as an agent for a supervising physician and surgeon.

 

(b) “Drug order,” for purposes of this section, means an order for medication that is dispensed to or for a patient, issued and signed by a physician assistant acting as an individual practitioner within the meaning of Section 1306.02 of Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, (1) a drug order issued pursuant to this section shall be treated in the same manner as a prescription or order of the supervising physician, (2) all references to “prescription” in this code and the Health and Safety Code shall include drug orders issued by physician assistants pursuant to authority granted by their supervising physicians and surgeons, and (3) the signature of a physician assistant on a drug order shall be deemed to be the signature of a prescriber for purposes of this code and the Health and Safety Code.

 

(c) A drug order for any patient cared for by the physician assistant that is issued by the physician assistant shall either be based on the protocols described in subdivision (a) or shall be approved by the supervising physician and surgeon before it is filled or carried out.

 

(1) A physician assistant shall not administer or provide a drug or issue a drug order for a drug other than for a drug listed in the formulary without advance approval from a supervising physician and surgeon for the particular patient. At the direction and under the supervision of a physician and surgeon, a physician assistant may hand to a patient of the supervising physician and surgeon a properly labeled prescription drug prepackaged by a physician and surgeon, manufacturer as defined in the Pharmacy Law, or a pharmacist.

 

(2) A physician assistant shall not administer, provide, or issue a drug order to a patient for Schedule II through Schedule V controlled substances without advance approval by a supervising physician and surgeon for that particular patient unless the physician assistant has completed an education course that covers controlled substances and that meets standards, including pharmacological content, approved by the board. The education course shall be provided either by an accredited continuing education provider or by an approved physician assistant training program. If the physician assistant will administer, provide, or issue a drug order for Schedule II controlled substances, the course shall contain a minimum of three hours exclusively on Schedule II controlled substances. Completion of the requirements set forth in this paragraph shall be verified and documented in the manner established by the board prior to the physician assistant’s use of a registration number issued by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration to the physician assistant to administer, provide, or issue a drug order to a patient for a controlled substance without advance approval by a supervising physician and surgeon for that particular patient.

 

(3) Any drug order issued by a physician assistant shall be subject to a reasonable quantitative limitation consistent with customary medical practice in the supervising physician and surgeon’s practice.

 

(d) A written drug order issued pursuant to subdivision (a), except a written drug order in a patient’s medical record in a health facility or medical practice, shall contain the printed name, address, and telephone number of the supervising physician and surgeon, the printed or stamped name and license number of the physician assistant, and the signature of the physician assistant. Further, a written drug order for a controlled substance, except a written drug order in a patient’s medical record in a health facility or a medical practice, shall include the federal controlled substances registration number of the physician assistant and shall otherwise comply with Section 11162.1 of the Health and Safety Code. Except as otherwise required for written drug orders for controlled substances under Section 11162.1 of the Health and Safety Code, the requirements of this subdivision may be met through stamping or otherwise imprinting on the supervising physician and surgeon’s prescription blank to show the name, license number, and if applicable, the federal controlled substances registration number of the physician assistant, and shall be signed by the physician assistant. When using a drug order, the physician assistant is acting on behalf of and as the agent of a supervising physician and surgeon.

 

(e) The supervising physician and surgeon shall use either of the following mechanisms to ensure adequate supervision of the administration, provision, or issuance by a physician assistant of a drug order to a patient for Schedule II controlled substances:

 

(1) The medical record of any patient cared for by a physician assistant for whom the physician assistant’s Schedule II drug order has been issued or carried out shall be reviewed, countersigned, and dated by a supervising physician and surgeon within seven days.

 

(2) If the physician assistant has documentation evidencing the successful completion of an education course that covers controlled substances, and that controlled substance education course (A) meets the standards, including pharmacological content, established in Sections 1399.610 and 1399.612 of Title 16 of the California Code of Regulations, and (B) is provided either by an accredited continuing education provider or by an approved physician assistant training program, the supervising physician and surgeon shall review, countersign, and date, within seven days, a sample consisting of the medical records of at least 20 percent of the patients cared for by the physician assistant for whom the physician assistant’s Schedule II drug order has been issued or carried out. Completion of the requirements set forth in this paragraph shall be verified and documented in the manner established in Section 1399.612 of Title 16 of the California Code of Regulations. Physician assistants who have a certificate of completion of the course described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (c) shall be deemed to have met the education course requirement of this subdivision.

 

(f) All physician assistants who are authorized by their supervising physicians to issue drug orders for controlled substances shall register with the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

 

(g) The board shall consult with the Medical Board of California and report during its sunset review required by Article 7.5 (commencing with Section 9147.7) of Chapter 1.5 of Part 1 of Division 2 of Title 2 of the Government Code the impacts of exempting Schedule III and Schedule IV drug orders from the requirement for a physician and surgeon to review and countersign the affected medical record of a patient.

 

(Amended by Stats. 2015, Ch. 536, Sec. 3. (SB 337) Effective January 1, 2016.)

 

HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE – HSC

DIVISION 10. UNIFORM CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ACT [11000 – 11651]

( Division 10 repealed and added by Stats. 1972, Ch. 1407. )

 

CHAPTER 4. Prescriptions [11150 – 11209]

( Chapter 4 added by Stats. 1972, Ch. 1407. )

 

ARTICLE 1. Requirements of Prescriptions [11150 – 11180]

( Article 1 added by Stats. 1972, Ch. 1407. )

 

11162.1.

 

(a) The prescription forms for controlled substances shall be printed with the following features:

 

(1) A latent, repetitive “void” pattern shall be printed across the entire front of the prescription blank; if a prescription is scanned or photocopied, the word “void” shall appear in a pattern across the entire front of the prescription.

 

(2) A watermark shall be printed on the backside of the prescription blank; the watermark shall consist of the words “California Security Prescription.”

 

(3) A chemical void protection that prevents alteration by chemical washing.

 

(4) A feature printed in thermochromic ink.

 

(5) An area of opaque writing so that the writing disappears if the prescription is lightened.

 

(6) A description of the security features included on each prescription form.

 

(7) (A) Six quantity check off boxes shall be printed on the form so that the prescriber may indicate the quantity by checking the applicable box where the following quantities shall appear:

 

1–24

 

25–49

 

50–74

 

75–100

 

101–150

 

151 and over.

 

(B) In conjunction with the quantity boxes, a space shall be provided to designate the units referenced in the quantity boxes when the drug is not in tablet or capsule form.

 

(8) Prescription blanks shall contain a statement printed on the bottom of the prescription blank that the “Prescription is void if the number of drugs prescribed is not noted.”

 

(9) The preprinted name, category of licensure, license number, federal controlled substance registration number, and address of the prescribing practitioner.

 

(10) Check boxes shall be printed on the form so that the prescriber may indicate the number of refills ordered.

 

(11) The date of origin of the prescription.

 

(12) A check box indicating the prescriber’s order not to substitute.

 

(13) An identifying number assigned to the approved security printer by the Department of Justice.

 

(14) (A) A check box by the name of each prescriber when a prescription form lists multiple prescribers.

 

(B) Each prescriber who signs the prescription form shall identify himself or herself as the prescriber by checking the box by his or her name.

 

(b) Each batch of controlled substance prescription forms shall have the lot number printed on the form and each form within that batch shall be numbered sequentially beginning with the numeral one.

 

(c) (1) A prescriber designated by a licensed health care facility, a clinic specified in Section 1200, or a clinic specified in subdivision (a) of Section 1206 that has 25 or more physicians or surgeons may order controlled substance prescription forms for use by prescribers when treating patients in that facility without the information required in paragraph (9) of subdivision (a) or paragraph (3) of this subdivision.

 

(2) Forms ordered pursuant to this subdivision shall have the name, category of licensure, license number, and federal controlled substance registration number of the designated prescriber and the name, address, category of licensure, and license number of the licensed health care facility the clinic specified in Section 1200, or the clinic specified in Section 1206 that has 25 or more physicians or surgeons preprinted on the form. Licensed health care facilities or clinics exempt under Section 1206 are not required to preprint the category of licensure and license number of their facility or clinic.

 

(3) Forms ordered pursuant to this section shall not be valid prescriptions without the name, category of licensure, license number, and federal controlled substance registration number of the prescriber on the form.

 

(4) (A) Except as provided in subparagraph (B), the designated prescriber shall maintain a record of the prescribers to whom the controlled substance prescription forms are issued, that shall include the name, category of licensure, license number, federal controlled substance registration number, and quantity of controlled substance prescription forms issued to each prescriber. The record shall be maintained in the health facility for three years.

 

(B) Forms ordered pursuant to this subdivision that are printed by a computerized prescription generation system shall not be subject to subparagraph (A) or paragraph (7) of subdivision (a). Forms printed pursuant to this subdivision that are printed by a computerized prescription generation system may contain the prescriber’s name, category of professional licensure, license number, federal controlled substance registration number, and the date of the prescription.

 

(d) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2012. Prescription forms not in compliance with this division shall not be valid or accepted after July 1, 2012.

 

(Amended by Stats. 2011, Ch. 418, Sec. 2. (SB 360) Effective January 1, 2012. Note: The Jan. 1, 2012, operative date in subd. (d) relates only to changes by this amendment (Stats. 2011, Ch. 418), not to this section as a whole.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/21/2018 at 11:01 PM, GetMeOuttaThisMess said:

No issue in N. Texas. I can’t get them to stop sending refill requests which are never refilled.

They have an automated system that fires off refill requests whether the patient asks for one or not. It will keep sending requests over and over no matter how many times you deny them until someone on their end turns off the refill request...which is why is seems to go on forever because they have to DO something to make them stop.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They have an automated system that fires off refill requests whether the patient asks for one or not. It will keep sending requests over and over no matter how many times you deny them until someone on their end turns off the refill request...which is why is seems to go on forever because they have to DO something to make them stop.


Thanks for the insight!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They have an automated system that fires off refill requests whether the patient asks for one or not. It will keep sending requests over and over no matter how many times you deny them until someone on their end turns off the refill request...which is why is seems to go on forever because they have to DO something to make them stop.

Yep. I get repeated requests even for pts who have left the practice and I had my MA call the pharmacy to let them know.

 

I miss calling the mom n pop pharmacies and speaking with the pharmacist that I have known for years and he/she already knows what I am refilling or prescribing, who I am and who the pt is etc.

 

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More