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AbeTheBabe

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About AbeTheBabe

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  1. I went to PA school in Florida and moved back to California after. I had no medical connections in California. I started applying to jobs around graduation. Did 3 or 4 phone interviews. One of them led to a Skype interview. Then I did 2 in person interviews right after moving back to Cali (literally the next day) and got offered a good position in Ortho with good pay the day after. I took it and I'm still there 3 years later. Just start applying around graduation, make sure to let them know you'll be moving there. Tell them when you plan to be there. It helps if you have a reason to be moving there (I'm from Cali and all my family is here so the practice knows your not just gonna pick up and leave after 6-12 months). Check LinkedIn, Indeed, AAPA, the state PA org website, even Craigslist. Good luck!
  2. AbeTheBabe

    First year review

    Ok, that makes a lot more sense. Still, ortho is a high paying specialty and if you're up and running and seeing that many patients now I would take no less than 10K raise. Check the salary report and see what your specialty pays in your state too, that may help.
  3. AbeTheBabe

    First year review

    I would definitely ask for AT LEAST 10K more. You're seeing 50 patients a day and doing all the charting? That's crazy. I'm in ortho too and I don't see nearly as many patients (no rounding/call/weekends/holidays) and made 125K last year with similar benefits and 2 years experience (although I live in SoCal so different cost of living).
  4. AbeTheBabe

    Should I confront a patient?

    Thank you everyone, I will take your advice to heart and will not be interacting with her. Happy new year everyone!
  5. AbeTheBabe

    Should I confront a patient?

    I totally understand that, that may have been her perception back a few months ago. Problem is, I had no interaction with her this time around other than closing her wound while she was asleep and trying to help her get different narcotics. The way she treated me was beyond unacceptable. Wishing me a horrible new year almost felt like she was putting a curse on me, guess it doesn't matter to her I have a wife and daughter depending on me. I guess I'm taking it especially hard because I was recently sick for a bit and spent a few days in the hospital. As far as going against another provider, I hope you guys don't misunderstand. My SP thinks of us as a team. I'm not going against him the handful of times I've had to break bad news to a patient. He would have done the same thing as far as being upfront about something being wrong. I did not blame my SP or his skill for the problem, and kept it as vague as possible. There are plenty of times when I'm not sure about something, don't say anything, and talk to my SP about it later.
  6. AbeTheBabe

    Should I confront a patient?

    I don't get why this thread has turned into whether or not it was appropriate for me to tell them something was wrong months ago. This was not the point of the post. If the surgeon was uncomfortable with me or did not want me to break bad news, he would not have me seeing all the first post-ops. No one here saw the x-rays I did, there was obviously an issue. Since she ended up having a revision a little while later, I was right. I'm not saying I know everything by any means, I'm sure I've missed plenty of things, but I know enough to tell an arthoplasty is malpositioned to the point of subluxation. I don't see what's wrong with being straightforward with a patient that there may be a problem, rather than pretend that there's nothing wrong.
  7. AbeTheBabe

    Should I confront a patient?

    Thank you everyone for your advice, I will just ignore her if I come across her in clinic. I have already put a not on the chart so that she won't be scheduled with me. Next time, I will not be going out of my way for this person. lxtexas4 - Yup, I definitely feel bad for anyone who has to put up with her on a regular basis. thinkertdm - No, my SP has not stepped in, he hasn't heard the VM yet he is out of town for the holidays. mrgriffiths - I share a hallway with my SP in clinic so that's basically when I would come into contact with her, but I can take care to avoid the hallway while she is checking in/out. ventana - I've been with the surgeon 3 years, I know when something is wrong. I've reduced dislocated arthroplasties when needed. He does not hav a big ego, we have a good relationship, he's completely fine with me breaking bad news to the patient if necessary. rev ronin - Thanks, that's a good idea. We should keep the VM just in case.
  8. I work in ortho, in a big private clinic, with one surgeon. I have a patient who left a horrible voicemail to our practice coordinator. I will keep this vague on purpose. The first time I ever saw her (aged 75-85 years old), she was a post-op 1 following arthroplasty. I took x-rays and didn't like how her arthoplasty was positioned. I told her that there may be an issue, but I would discuss with the surgeon (who wasn't there) and get back to her. I guess she didn't like what I had to say, so at some point I know she said I was worthless to our practice coordinator. Now months later after failing PT and having continued pain/limitations she had a revision. She had a lot of pain after surgery, and needed a different type of narcotic because the one we gave caused a mild allergy. She is calling staff hysterical because of the issue, you can barely get a word in. They explain that only the surgeon (who is out town for the holidays) has the ability to e-prescribe narcotics, I am in the office but would have to write a prescription and she lives roughly 2 hours away. I've been waiting for this ability for over a year (and so have probably 90% of the physicians, very few people have that ability right now). My staff tells her to ask her PCP, they give her a hard time. So I call her PCP to ask if they can please give her a weeks supply to hold her over to her post-op appointment. I'm only able to talk to the nurse, and I give her an estimate of what she would need as far as # of pills. Mind you it was a pain getting through to that office, I could have been a dick and told her to go to the ER or said we will just mail her an RX. So she calls at some point leaving another hysterical voicemail. She calls me out by name, again saying I'm worthless. Conveying her disappointment in the number of pills I asked them to prescribe with choice curse words. She even said that she hopes I have a horrible New Year. After she got her pills, she called the practice coordinator with another message apologizing to her for speaking that way, but did not give an apology to me. Now I am usually a very calm and understanding person, and in the 3 years of working, I can count on one hand the number of patients who have gotten under my skin. However, this lady took it to another level. I've never heard anyone saying such vile things about their worst enemies, much less someone who is trying to help you. I had my staff save the message to show the surgeon and possibly management. I've already put a note in her chart for her not to be put on my schedule. My question is, what do I do when I eventually see her in the office? To be honest, I'd like to confront her and give her a piece of mind. I don't know how someone got to so far in life with her obvious underlying psychiatric and anger management issues. Or should I ignore her, chalking it up to a demented and addicted person who doesn't know any better?
  9. AbeTheBabe

    Contract

    Besides being a bad deal, full time personal injury and WC will suck the life out of you. Find a real ortho gig. We have roughly 20% WC patients at our practice and it's amazing the amount of paperwork, peer to peer calls to get anything done, and patients have a big reason not to get better.
  10. Depends on what you started with a little bit, hopefully you're not getting paid some weird "training" salary. The last two years my raise has been $5K/year to my base salary.
  11. Here is the email I got from CAPA today: CVS Prescriptions ALERT Robert Miller, PA, Professional Practice Committee Chair; Treasurer; Past President It has come to our attention that many CVS pharmacies have been refusing to fill prescriptions submitted by PAs in California when the prescription does not include the name of the supervising physician on the form. In addition, some have also required the physician’s DEA# and NPI. We are contacting CVS to determine the scope of this policy. THE REQUIREMENT TO INCLUDE THE PHYSICIAN NAME ON A PRESCRIPTION IS NOT NEW. This requirement has been in place since 1994. Be aware that the California PA Practice Act, excerpt from B&P Code § 3502.1, does clearly state that: (d) A written drug order issued pursuant to subdivision (a), except a written drug order in a patient’s medical record in a health facility or medical practice, shall contain the printed name, address, and telephone number of the supervising physician and surgeon, the printed or stamped name and license number of the physician assistant, and the signature of the physician assistant. Further, a written drug order for a controlled substance, except a written drug order in a patient’s medical record in a health facility or a medical practice, shall include the federal controlled substances registration number of the physician assistant and shall otherwise comply with Section 11162.1 of the Health and Safety Code. (Entire B&P Code § 3502.1 is below) The above statute requires the physician name, address and phone number to be included in a prescription submitted by a PA but does not specifically require the physician’s DEA# or NPI. Problems arise with e-prescribing when you are unable to add the required information on the prescription. It may be related to limitations in EHR system designs where there is no ability to add the physician name or other identifiers onto a prescription along with the PA. You may need to modify your EHR capabilities. In addition, the excerpt below, from the California Health and Safety Code, Uniform Controlled Substances Act, § 11162.1, (referred to above) regarding preprinted prescriptions for controlled substances, states that the prescription form shall contain: (9) The preprinted name, category of licensure, license number, federal controlled substance registration number, and address of the prescribing practitioner. (Entire H&S Code § 11162.1 is below) Also know that “stamping” information as stated in § 3502.1 above is not allowed on controlled substances security preprinted prescription forms BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONS CODE – BPC DIVISION 2. HEALING ARTS [500 – 4999.129] ( Division 2 enacted by Stats. 1937, Ch. 399. ) CHAPTER 7.7. Physician Assistants [3500 – 3546] ( Heading of Chapter 7.7 amended by Stats. 1992, Ch. 427, Sec. 5. ) ARTICLE 1. General Provisions [3500 – 3503.5] ( Article 1 added by Stats. 1975, Ch. 634. ) 3502.1. (a) In addition to the services authorized in the regulations adopted by the Medical Board of California, and except as prohibited by Section 3502, while under the supervision of a licensed physician and surgeon or physicians and surgeons authorized by law to supervise a physician assistant, a physician assistant may administer or provide medication to a patient, or transmit orally, or in writing on a patient’s record or in a drug order, an order to a person who may lawfully furnish the medication or medical device pursuant to subdivisions (c) and (d). (1) A supervising physician and surgeon who delegates authority to issue a drug order to a physician assistant may limit this authority by specifying the manner in which the physician assistant may issue delegated prescriptions. (2) Each supervising physician and surgeon who delegates the authority to issue a drug order to a physician assistant shall first prepare and adopt, or adopt, a written, practice specific, formulary and protocols that specify all criteria for the use of a particular drug or device, and any contraindications for the selection. Protocols for Schedule II controlled substances shall address the diagnosis of illness, injury, or condition for which the Schedule II controlled substance is being administered, provided, or issued. The drugs listed in the protocols shall constitute the formulary and shall include only drugs that are appropriate for use in the type of practice engaged in by the supervising physician and surgeon. When issuing a drug order, the physician assistant is acting on behalf of and as an agent for a supervising physician and surgeon. (b) “Drug order,” for purposes of this section, means an order for medication that is dispensed to or for a patient, issued and signed by a physician assistant acting as an individual practitioner within the meaning of Section 1306.02 of Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, (1) a drug order issued pursuant to this section shall be treated in the same manner as a prescription or order of the supervising physician, (2) all references to “prescription” in this code and the Health and Safety Code shall include drug orders issued by physician assistants pursuant to authority granted by their supervising physicians and surgeons, and (3) the signature of a physician assistant on a drug order shall be deemed to be the signature of a prescriber for purposes of this code and the Health and Safety Code. (c) A drug order for any patient cared for by the physician assistant that is issued by the physician assistant shall either be based on the protocols described in subdivision (a) or shall be approved by the supervising physician and surgeon before it is filled or carried out. (1) A physician assistant shall not administer or provide a drug or issue a drug order for a drug other than for a drug listed in the formulary without advance approval from a supervising physician and surgeon for the particular patient. At the direction and under the supervision of a physician and surgeon, a physician assistant may hand to a patient of the supervising physician and surgeon a properly labeled prescription drug prepackaged by a physician and surgeon, manufacturer as defined in the Pharmacy Law, or a pharmacist. (2) A physician assistant shall not administer, provide, or issue a drug order to a patient for Schedule II through Schedule V controlled substances without advance approval by a supervising physician and surgeon for that particular patient unless the physician assistant has completed an education course that covers controlled substances and that meets standards, including pharmacological content, approved by the board. The education course shall be provided either by an accredited continuing education provider or by an approved physician assistant training program. If the physician assistant will administer, provide, or issue a drug order for Schedule II controlled substances, the course shall contain a minimum of three hours exclusively on Schedule II controlled substances. Completion of the requirements set forth in this paragraph shall be verified and documented in the manner established by the board prior to the physician assistant’s use of a registration number issued by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration to the physician assistant to administer, provide, or issue a drug order to a patient for a controlled substance without advance approval by a supervising physician and surgeon for that particular patient. (3) Any drug order issued by a physician assistant shall be subject to a reasonable quantitative limitation consistent with customary medical practice in the supervising physician and surgeon’s practice. (d) A written drug order issued pursuant to subdivision (a), except a written drug order in a patient’s medical record in a health facility or medical practice, shall contain the printed name, address, and telephone number of the supervising physician and surgeon, the printed or stamped name and license number of the physician assistant, and the signature of the physician assistant. Further, a written drug order for a controlled substance, except a written drug order in a patient’s medical record in a health facility or a medical practice, shall include the federal controlled substances registration number of the physician assistant and shall otherwise comply with Section 11162.1 of the Health and Safety Code. Except as otherwise required for written drug orders for controlled substances under Section 11162.1 of the Health and Safety Code, the requirements of this subdivision may be met through stamping or otherwise imprinting on the supervising physician and surgeon’s prescription blank to show the name, license number, and if applicable, the federal controlled substances registration number of the physician assistant, and shall be signed by the physician assistant. When using a drug order, the physician assistant is acting on behalf of and as the agent of a supervising physician and surgeon. (e) The supervising physician and surgeon shall use either of the following mechanisms to ensure adequate supervision of the administration, provision, or issuance by a physician assistant of a drug order to a patient for Schedule II controlled substances: (1) The medical record of any patient cared for by a physician assistant for whom the physician assistant’s Schedule II drug order has been issued or carried out shall be reviewed, countersigned, and dated by a supervising physician and surgeon within seven days. (2) If the physician assistant has documentation evidencing the successful completion of an education course that covers controlled substances, and that controlled substance education course (A) meets the standards, including pharmacological content, established in Sections 1399.610 and 1399.612 of Title 16 of the California Code of Regulations, and (B) is provided either by an accredited continuing education provider or by an approved physician assistant training program, the supervising physician and surgeon shall review, countersign, and date, within seven days, a sample consisting of the medical records of at least 20 percent of the patients cared for by the physician assistant for whom the physician assistant’s Schedule II drug order has been issued or carried out. Completion of the requirements set forth in this paragraph shall be verified and documented in the manner established in Section 1399.612 of Title 16 of the California Code of Regulations. Physician assistants who have a certificate of completion of the course described in paragraph (2) of subdivision (c) shall be deemed to have met the education course requirement of this subdivision. (f) All physician assistants who are authorized by their supervising physicians to issue drug orders for controlled substances shall register with the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). (g) The board shall consult with the Medical Board of California and report during its sunset review required by Article 7.5 (commencing with Section 9147.7) of Chapter 1.5 of Part 1 of Division 2 of Title 2 of the Government Code the impacts of exempting Schedule III and Schedule IV drug orders from the requirement for a physician and surgeon to review and countersign the affected medical record of a patient. (Amended by Stats. 2015, Ch. 536, Sec. 3. (SB 337) Effective January 1, 2016.) HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE – HSC DIVISION 10. UNIFORM CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES ACT [11000 – 11651] ( Division 10 repealed and added by Stats. 1972, Ch. 1407. ) CHAPTER 4. Prescriptions [11150 – 11209] ( Chapter 4 added by Stats. 1972, Ch. 1407. ) ARTICLE 1. Requirements of Prescriptions [11150 – 11180] ( Article 1 added by Stats. 1972, Ch. 1407. ) 11162.1. (a) The prescription forms for controlled substances shall be printed with the following features: (1) A latent, repetitive “void” pattern shall be printed across the entire front of the prescription blank; if a prescription is scanned or photocopied, the word “void” shall appear in a pattern across the entire front of the prescription. (2) A watermark shall be printed on the backside of the prescription blank; the watermark shall consist of the words “California Security Prescription.” (3) A chemical void protection that prevents alteration by chemical washing. (4) A feature printed in thermochromic ink. (5) An area of opaque writing so that the writing disappears if the prescription is lightened. (6) A description of the security features included on each prescription form. (7) (A) Six quantity check off boxes shall be printed on the form so that the prescriber may indicate the quantity by checking the applicable box where the following quantities shall appear: 1–24 25–49 50–74 75–100 101–150 151 and over. (B) In conjunction with the quantity boxes, a space shall be provided to designate the units referenced in the quantity boxes when the drug is not in tablet or capsule form. (8) Prescription blanks shall contain a statement printed on the bottom of the prescription blank that the “Prescription is void if the number of drugs prescribed is not noted.” (9) The preprinted name, category of licensure, license number, federal controlled substance registration number, and address of the prescribing practitioner. (10) Check boxes shall be printed on the form so that the prescriber may indicate the number of refills ordered. (11) The date of origin of the prescription. (12) A check box indicating the prescriber’s order not to substitute. (13) An identifying number assigned to the approved security printer by the Department of Justice. (14) (A) A check box by the name of each prescriber when a prescription form lists multiple prescribers. (B) Each prescriber who signs the prescription form shall identify himself or herself as the prescriber by checking the box by his or her name. (b) Each batch of controlled substance prescription forms shall have the lot number printed on the form and each form within that batch shall be numbered sequentially beginning with the numeral one. (c) (1) A prescriber designated by a licensed health care facility, a clinic specified in Section 1200, or a clinic specified in subdivision (a) of Section 1206 that has 25 or more physicians or surgeons may order controlled substance prescription forms for use by prescribers when treating patients in that facility without the information required in paragraph (9) of subdivision (a) or paragraph (3) of this subdivision. (2) Forms ordered pursuant to this subdivision shall have the name, category of licensure, license number, and federal controlled substance registration number of the designated prescriber and the name, address, category of licensure, and license number of the licensed health care facility the clinic specified in Section 1200, or the clinic specified in Section 1206 that has 25 or more physicians or surgeons preprinted on the form. Licensed health care facilities or clinics exempt under Section 1206 are not required to preprint the category of licensure and license number of their facility or clinic. (3) Forms ordered pursuant to this section shall not be valid prescriptions without the name, category of licensure, license number, and federal controlled substance registration number of the prescriber on the form. (4) (A) Except as provided in subparagraph (B), the designated prescriber shall maintain a record of the prescribers to whom the controlled substance prescription forms are issued, that shall include the name, category of licensure, license number, federal controlled substance registration number, and quantity of controlled substance prescription forms issued to each prescriber. The record shall be maintained in the health facility for three years. (B) Forms ordered pursuant to this subdivision that are printed by a computerized prescription generation system shall not be subject to subparagraph (A) or paragraph (7) of subdivision (a). Forms printed pursuant to this subdivision that are printed by a computerized prescription generation system may contain the prescriber’s name, category of professional licensure, license number, federal controlled substance registration number, and the date of the prescription. (d) This section shall become operative on January 1, 2012. Prescription forms not in compliance with this division shall not be valid or accepted after July 1, 2012. (Amended by Stats. 2011, Ch. 418, Sec. 2. (SB 360) Effective January 1, 2012. Note: The Jan. 1, 2012, operative date in subd. (d) relates only to changes by this amendment (Stats. 2011, Ch. 418), not to this section as a whole.)
  12. Is this a low or medium cost of living city in Florida? To be honest, that is unreasonable. If they pay you for call then fine. At the minimum you should get $300 extra during a weekday and $600 extra for a weekend day. I don't take call so others can comment more on numbers. In the beginning there will hopefully be a lot of shadowing and your patient panel will hopefully start off light so not having an MA in the beginning is not a deal-breaker. The urologists MA should be shared when you start seeing patients if possible.
  13. AbeTheBabe

    New grad, new baby

    Honestly if you're due so soon after graduation, I'd start interviewing after you've delivered and just not mention the baby at all. Get your rest after the PANCE, have a safe delivery, enjoy some time with your new baby. Then when you're feeling up to it, send out your resumes and go in for those interviews.
  14. Yes basically threatening to send patients elsewhere is the only way to deal with this. There's like 20 PAs and 50 MDs in my group so hopefully that will get them to reconsider. I send most prescriptions electronically so I will just find the nearest non CVS pharmacy for the patient until they change their ways.
  15. My MA got a call from CVS asking for confirmation from MD for a prescription of ibuprofen. She was kind of surprised as my prescriptions were never a problem before. She asked what the problem is, it's not even a controlled substance, etc. The person said CVS has a new rule that any PA prescriptions need to be approved by physician. Then the next day management was asking me if I'd heard anything like that as they heard it from another source. Is this only in California? Nationwide? Should I just tell my patients to go to another pharmacy? This would cause a ridiculous amount of work for staff if this is the case.
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