jd4mvp

Current PA Emergency Fellow @ Albany Med; Blog

59 posts in this topic

Hey y'all!  Just wanted to update everybody on my work situation.  I landed my dream job working in the ED at a critical access hospital in rural Montana (skiing!).  We have a unique situation here with solo coverage and somewhat limited resources.  We cover all of the shifts with 2 docs and 2 PA's, each working solo, and in the same capacity.  The docs are family medicine trained, but have worked in urgent care/ emergency medicine for over 20 yrs individually.  We have a high incidence of trauma, substance abuse, mental health, diabetes, and obesity related issues, being located next to a large reservation and undeserved population (HPSA score 16).  At nights we are the only provider in house as the hospitalist is typically at home, this means we cover the codes on the floor, which I learned can be very...exciting?!.  My second day on the job I responded to a code blue on the floor where we managed to reverse a VF cardiac arrest with one shock.  Needless to say I would not be qualified, or have the skills necessary (in such short time), to perform this job adequately if not for the Fellowship at AMC.  Everyone here seems to be very impressed with my knowledge base and skill set, and as the only specifically trained ED provider, I feel I bring a strong presence to our ED.  I have already been thrown into the lecture schedule and find myself giving a much needed evidence based prospective to the clinic, ED, and hospital.  I plan to stay awhile :)

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Congrats, there are not a lot of jobs like that around so I wouldn't be too quick to leave. I know of less than 10 similar jobs for PAs nationwide encompassing maybe 50 PAs total. These jobs are all in the states of VT, ME, NE, MT, WA, ND, WY, OK, MI, and SD. I work at one such place with 4 other PAs and it is the only similar opportunity within hundreds of miles. It took me 15 years as an em pa to land the job(I sent them my cv every year for 10 years) and you got one right out of residency! That says a lot about the quality of your learning experience and the value of residency. congrats again!

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Congrats Jordan!!!! It has been so encouraging and exciting to follow you and Matt's journey through this residency program! I can't thank you both enough for detailing this experience. I just submitted my application to AMC today, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed!

 

Keep up that amazing spirit and passion :)

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Hey everyone! My name is Eric and I am one of the 4 fellows at Albany Medical Center ER currently. I felt now was a great time to comment on my experience so far because I am about half way through the fellowship. So far in addition to all my ER shifts I have completeted rotations in: ultrasound, toxicology, ophthalmology, pediatrics, anesthesia, radiology. I still have yet to do a rotation in CCU, SICU, EMS, trauma. and my elective month.

 

I started my fellowship with 2 weeks of ultrasound training which was beyond amazing to learn. When we were not doing class or hands on with our attending, myself and another one of the fellows were out in the ER ultrasounding every person we could find which was amazing because patient's were very receptive to letting us practice and learn and just by explaining to the patient what we were looking at and for, helped educate the patient and us reinforce the skills and knowledge exponentially. Matt and I even took it a little further and started learning how to apply ultrasound to many other things (i.e. Ophthalmology, peritonsillar abscesses, etc.). After hearing from previous fellows how marketable ultrasound training was when applying to jobs, I made it a point to keep up with my ultrasound skills and get as much exerperience as I possibly could. So far I have about 560 ultrasounds logged of various kinds. Dr. Cadigan who is our ultrasound ER guru is exceptionally amazing to work with and will take free time to go out of her way and explain something to you if you have any questions.

 

As Jenelle has previously mentioned, I too feel that I did not have the confidence I should with seeing patients with eye complaints. We unfortunately did not have a great deal of Ophthalmology training in school. I will even admit that when I saw patient's initially in the ER at the beginning of my fellowship I was intimidated by doing a good and thorough slit-lamp examination or even knowing who needs to be consulted and who can be sent home with follow-up. Well after my Ophthalmology rotation with various amazing Ophtho residents and attendings at AMC, I was a rockstar! I learned so much and just learning how to perform a good and thorough slit-lamp examination alone is a huge help. I now see patient's and do things without even needing to consult Ophto residents to do. I remove foreign bodies from people's corneas. I even performed a laceration repair of a lid margin using 7-0 chromic gut sutures, which impressed the Ophthalmology resident that is something that normally requires a skilled Ophthalmologist to handle. So needless to say, I have now have a huge passion for Ophthalmology and find that other PAs, residents, and sometimes attendings have asked me questions about using the slit-lamp or with handling certain Ophtho complaints, which is a huge confidence booster.

 

Toxicology was beyond amazing. I never how much existed regarding tox until doing this rotation. Albany Medical Center ER is extremely fortunate that we have 3 amazing board certified Toxicologists! Between the lectures and tox cases that I had, I gained a huge amount of knowledge that I would have never learned otherwise. We learned not just drugs/medications, but how to recognize and treat certain exposures to chemicals (i.e. from patient's place of employment), plants, etc. Now when we get overdoses or exposure to random chemicals, I jump right on it and feel confident seeing those patient's and knowing how to treat them accordingly.

 

Anesthesia was an amazing experience. I don't know how many intubations some people may have done while in school, but after talking to some of my friends who have completed a year of ER as a PA, they have done ZERO. With that said, I did 32 intubations in 1 week alone! Talk about a great experience, after that week I felt like I could walk into any situation and intubate without any hesitation.

 

Pediatrics was a great rotation because let's face it, kids can be very intimidating to treat. Unless you have that background in Pediatrics, there are a lot of differences in working up a kid or newborn baby. We have some absolutely amazing Pediatric ER certified attendings and they just made the experience amazing. I loved every minute of it, and within 1 week alone I was picking up ICU level peds patient's.

 

All in all, my experience over the past 6 months has been beyond amazing and far exceeded my expectations prior to starting the program. It is also great because I have 3 other amazing PA fellows that I work with, and we enjoy sharing our experiences with one another because we all want to learn and help each other come out of this program with the most knowledge that we can possibly gain over this year. Everyone else in the ER has been great from nurses to the other PAs, residents, and attending physicians. I find that no matter how busy it may be sometimes, there is always someone is willing to help if I have a question or feel like I need to bounce some ideas off of them. If anyone has any questions at all about my experience or the program itself feel free to contact me williae1@mail.amc.edu.

 

I will definitely keep updating this blog with any latest experiences or news.

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Hey everyone. If you have already read my blog in the AMC part deux section, this is pretty much the same thing. One of our PA fellow graduates from several years ago had started this forum and then Andy from my class started the part deux forum, so I have tried to keep them both going as they both portray experience from PA fellows throughout many years.

 

I graduated from the Albany Medical Center ER PA fellowship about 1.5 years ago. Since finishing my fellowship, I actually stayed at Albany Med and took a job working overnights in the ER. One of the greatest aspects about working my overnight shift is that there are very few residents and I (being the only PA on during the night time) work solely in the trauma section of the ER. I have to say that without a doubt it would be difficult to handle such an intense area of the ER. I don't think that I would be able to function so well if it had not been for my fellowship training. Additionally, having done a fellowship and having the skills and knowledge I acquired, the attending physicians love how autonomous I am. Since it is only myself and 1 resident in the trauma zone, when we have multiple trauma's or sick patient's simultaneously, I can manage them confidently, and the attending physicians love it. I continue to have the ability to perform all the procedures that I did during fellowship, which yet again would be a huge challenge if I did not have so much prior experience. Often, I go off by myself without anyone in the room and perform invasive procedures (i.e. chest tubes, central lines, etc). I have done so many at this point, that I even teach and let PA students do some of these procedures. It is also not uncommon that the attending physician will have me even teach some of the residents how to do these procedures, since I have done more than many of them.

 

Another area that I have now become more involved in is the academic side of things. I love getting to work with the current PA fellows and passing my knowledge to them, in addition to giving away procedures to them that I may have (which they greatly appreciate) because I want to help contribute to trying to make the program be the best experience possible for anyone that goes through it. Since I have so much ultrasound experience, I was even asked to be the point person that trains all the PA's on ultrasound. I feel very honored to still be a relatively new PA, yet because of how good I am at ultrasound, I am now in charge of training a large group of physician assistants (with many more years of experience than me). I have also become involved with SIM center training and myself and another PA have worked hard to try and make SIM training better than ever. I absolutely love my job, and I love all the emails I receive from everyone who has interest in a fellowship. If i've said it before, i'll say it again, hands down the best thing I ever could have done out of school. So for those that are interested, please do not hesitate to contact me as I am always happy to answer any questions that people may have. Williae1@mail.amc.edu

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Hi all,

 

The Albany Medical Center Physician Assistant Post-graduate Fellowship in Emergency Medicine is pleased to announce that we are currently accepting applications for our next Fellowship class,which will begin Fall 2017. We are will be accepting 5 fellows for the class next year.
 
Attached please find our program brochure and application.
 
Additional Information, as well as the application, can be found on our program's website
 
 
"LIKE" us on Facebook
 

 

My name is Adam Lloyd and I am the founder and Co-Director of the PA Emergency Medicine Fellowship Program at Albany Medical Center.  We have been fortunate to have had our alumni fellow Jordan start this blog several years ago.  His blog definitely illuminates the curriculum we have at our program.  Please feel free to reach out to me at lloyda@mail.amc.edu if you have any questions.

 

Sincerely,

Adam 

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Hey Everyone, 

 

My name is Katie and I am a current fellow ('16-'17) here at AMC. I just wanted to reach out as I don't think you have heard from anyone in my current fellow class. As everyone has noted previously this has been an amazing experience. I am about 6-7 months in and have completed rotations in Ultrasound, Ophthalmology, Toxicology, CCU, and community medicine. Currently I am on my airway rotation. Today we started interviews for the next class of fellows and one of the popular questions was "What is your favorite rotation so far?" For me that is difficult to answer because I really have enjoyed all of them, and learned so much on each and every one. I will say that following each rotation I return to the Emergency Department with more confidence in treating patients with those specific conditions. I still have a lot to accomplish and a couple more rotations left however I have learned so much over the past couple of months. As many people have mentioned before the procedural experience has been amazing. From what I have heard from prior fellows, when they look for jobs potential employers are always astounded at the amount of procedures we have under out belt (I will keep you posted on that one--I am just starting that process.) I also want to speak about the acuity of the patients that we see here at AMC. Many are very sick, therefore you are able to get exposure to a wide variety of pathology. I know that in comparing the patients that I see in a day to some of the patients my classmates from PA school care for is eye opening. At the same time the attendings that I work with have been really amazing. If you need help or guidance they have your back. They are also very open to teaching--and really pro-PAs (which unfortunately isn't always the case elsewhere). Our program directors are also amazing. They are always open for feedback and interested in making this the best experience possible. Every year they make subtle changes to ensure that we are getting the most out of our experience. I think the prior fellows in this blog have gone over the curriculum and process really well. If any of you have further questions or want to hear more about the process feel free to reach out to me. I am here to answer any questions you may have. Thanks. -K

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