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  1. The University of California San Francisco (UCSF) - Fresno Emergency Medicine PA Residency is accepting applications for the 2020 application cycle. This 18-month postgraduate program, affiliated with the UCSF School of Medicine, is designed to prepare PAs to practice in a variety of emergency medicine environments. We will be accepting 2 residents in 2020. The class will start June 29, 2020 but we will be offering rolling admissions into the Fall for accepted applicants who have a later PA school graduation date. Deadline to apply is January 15, 2020. Rotations include: Trauma Critical Care Pediatric Emergency Medicine Burn Orthopedics Dermatology Ophthalmology Oral Maxillofacial Surgery Toxicology Emergency Ultrasound Anesthesia EMS  Resuscitation courses include: ACLS, ATLS, BLS, PALS 18-month stipend: $90,000 Benefits include medical, dental, vision, life insurance, disability insurance, 401k, employee assistance program, 4 weeks of vacation, membership in the Society of Emergency Medicine Physician Assistants (SEMPA), UCSF email access, textbook, malpractice coverage, and more. Paid travel to SEMPA 360, SEMPA's annual conference. Our state-of-the-art ED at Community Regional Medical Center serves as the only Level 1 Trauma Center/Burn Center for Central California, and handles an annual ED volume of over 110,000. The Department of Emergency Medicine hosts fellowships in Emergency Ultrasound, Medical Education, and Wilderness Medicine. Our faculty are involved with EM:RAP, EMS, wilderness medicine, ultrasound, medical education, toxicology, international emergency medicine, and more. They are also leaders within ACEP and SEMPA. For more information, please see the attached flyer. Website: http://www.fresno.ucsf.edu/emergency-medicine-physician-assistant/ Email: em.pa.residency@fresno.ucsf.edu Residency Flyer.pdf
  2. UNM EMPA RESIDENCY: The University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine is excited to announce that we are accepting applicants now for our 2020-2021 class. Applications will close Jan 15th, 2020. Our class will start the last week of June, 2018 for an 18-month program for 2 residents. This year we have expanded our eligibility to applicants graduating an ARC-PA accredited program prior to May 31st, 2020. We strive to equip physician assistants with the clinical experiences and didactic teaching that will enable them to practice high-quality, evidence based emergency medicine. Our graduates will have comfort and competence in the care of critically ill patients, the broad scope of emergent presentations, and the skills necessary to be leaders in their profession. Cirriculum (# of 4 week blocks) Dedicated Orientation Block (1) Adult ED, including dedicated longitudinal block in ED Resus Unit (8) Community ED (1) Peds ED (2) Medical ICU (1) Surgical ICU (1) Combined US/Anesthesia (1) Cardiology (1) Orthopedics (1) Toxicology (1/2) OB/GYN (1/2) Electives (2) Salary/Benefits: $57,000 yearly salary Access to health, vision, dental, disability insurance with employer matching Contribution to retirement Paid Vacation Paid travel and registration SEMPA 360 conference SEMPA membership $500 per year CME allowance ATLS, FCCS, and dedicated airway course in orientation Setting: New Mexico's only level 1 trauma center, academic hospital and children's hospital Tertiary referral center for large rural state, with high acuity patients Easy access to outdoor activities, climbing, biking, skiing, as well as wonderful food and culture Nationally recognized faculty in EMS, Critical Care, Wilderness Medicine, Simulation and many other areas Applications Open: October 1st, 2019 Applications Close: January 15th, 2020 Website: http://emed.unm.edu/education/prospective-applicants/physician-assistant-residency-in-emergency-medicine.html E-mail: cpkalan@salud.unm.edu
  3. https://www.fresno.ucsf.edu/actspar Wondering if anyone has any experience/information/thoughts UCSF Fresno, specifically this ACS/Trauma Surgery Residency. Considering relocating for the opportunity. New grad, I liked what I saw during the visit. Not looking for some one to make a decision for me, but any information would be great. Thanks
  4. Hey all, As there seems to be a lot of growing interest in EM PA residencies across the country, I just thought I'd start this to (hopefully) offer answers to any burning questions you guys have about EM residency in general or at Iowa in particular. Ask away! I'll edit this initial post to include all Q&A to make it easier on the reader. Who I am: Year-1 EM PA resident at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC); Graduated from South University - Tampa C/O 2015; formerly trained as EMT, paramedic. ***Obligatory disclaimer: I do not represent UIHC, nor the EM PA residency program there, nor any other part of the institution of the University of Iowa in any other capacity than as a resident learner and medical provider in the Emergency Treatment Center. All answers are based on my current knowledge, personal opinion, and/or cited references.*** Why did you choose this particular program? There's lots to love about the residency experience here: PAs are on equal footing with medical residents, the "your patient, your procedure" policy, high availability of attending faculty during your shifts, the well-organized administration, variety of electives (and option to create your own)... there's much more. However, far and away the thing that impressed me the most was the amazing faculty. It was apparent from my interview day onward... Easygoing, personable, humble, reasonable people; only ever as serious as they need to be; will often go out of their way to drop some knowledge on you. They inspire respect not out of fear or intimidation, but by their scope of knowledge and willingness to teach. Large egos are not in fashion here. Everyone is known by their first name or nickname. Since I've started, I realized this mentality has trickled down to the R2s and R3s as well; everyone is willing to help out. Other than that, moving to a small Midwest town has always been on my bucket list for some reason. Iowa City is a great little town too; full of great culture for its size, but small enough that I walk/bike to work every day. I probably couldn't have picked a better time either, with Hawkeyes having had a blowout season and the Iowa Caususes soon, I feel like I'm getting the quintessential Midwest experience. Do you feel you get enough slit lamps, chest tubes, intubations, ect. without having several off service rotations? I know procedures is the big question; personally I feel like I'm off to an adequate start after 3 blocks in the ED, and just now starting to get confidence in picking up patients that need these procedures. Also keep in mind this is (mostly rural) Iowa, and you're not going to see GSWs or similar trauma every night like you would in Baltimore or Philadelphia, although a good amount of MVCs. That said, each resident's mileage will vary; if you're procedure-hungry, you could probably expect to increase your numbers up to about 30% over mine (total guesstimate). So here's some numbers, keeping in mind this is a new PA grad, with 12 weeks in the ED so far, where I was the Primary on the procedure: 4 LPs, 4 paracenteses, 1 chest tube, 1 US-guided central line (fem), 0 intubations, 4 dental blocks, countless peripheral nerve blocks... and i haven't logged slit lamps but i'd say probably 5-6; I could have been doing many more slitlamps if I wanted. There's a dedicated ophtho room with slit-lamp setup here, and if you want to pick up all the ophtho patients for a night I don't think anyone would fight you for it. One thing definitely worth mentioning that often gets overlooked, we have 2 or 3 portable ultrasounds for bedside studies available 24/7, with linear, curvilinear, and cardiac probes attached. If you ever want to play around with ultrasound it's there. We use it all the time for peripheral IVs on tough sticks, checking for abscess/pockets, FAST exams... even some fancy nerve blocks. As cool as it is to poke prod and cut a patient, sometimes I feel that as a PA, the highest-yield learning during this residency won't be the procedures but my proficiency with ultrasound. But again, your mileage may vary. How is housing near the hospital? Housing nearby to the hospital is great, from what I hear. I actually live on the other side of the river in downtown Iowa City (which wouldn't be my first choice for a family) but there are many available houses for rent in the University Heights area that I think would work well for a family (and it's closer to the hospital too). Are they pretty bias about picking Iowa grass or would a person with FM/military medicine experience be given a good shot? I think any great candidate is given a good shot. That being said, Iowa has a fantastic PA program, and most of the residency applicants are graduates from there, so if you look at the numbers it may appear that they're heavily favored. However, I didn't graduate from there and I got in, and I didn't have to beg. Two of the three initial acceptance offers given for the latest class were to out-of-state candidates, one of those being a military-trained PA. So I would say everything considered, there's not a perceptible selection bias. What's your biggest dislike of the program? Honestly, I can't think of anything I dislike that would be particular to this program; I feel that any dislikes would be common to most if not all programs. I really tried to come up with something and I've started writing several different things here but erased them, because they didn't seem like they were real problems. Mostly just annoyances, ones likely to be encountered anywhere, and largely an issue that is outside the program's or ED's control. But if you want to know the ups and downs of something in particular I can try to help. Do you think that NOT being from an EM background hinders someone's chances? Hinders vs a candidate that has an EM background? I have to say yes; at a minimum, an EM background shows a proven interest and ability to handle the particular stresses that come with EM. I wouldn't let that stop me from applying though; I would just go wild on my EM rotations in PA school and do as much as possible there, and make sure to mention it during the interview. What's the hour work week look like - Any time for picking up additional shifts for supplemental income? During your ED blocks (which are the vast majority) you have about 45 hours (5 shifts x 9 hours) of scheduled work hours. However, amount of shifts can vary from week to week. Shift times also vary, from morning to day to overnight. Scheduling for the most part always puts your next shift equal or later in the day than your last, which is helpful. Also, it's rare to always have all documentation done before your shift ends. I'd say I work at least 1 additional hour per shift, often several hours if it's been a rough day. I finish my documentation before shift ends maybe 10% of the time. I will say I'm not the fastest documenter, but in general I would probably my numbers are a safe estimate. UIHC doesn't allow PA residents to pick up ad-hoc shifts as regularly employed PAs, at least last time I checked. I believe working at an outside facility is possible with permission, but don't quote me on that. How's the whole interview process, structure, day like? Similar to PA school. Morning presentations by faculty and administration, a tour of the ED, the resident's lounge and offices. Four or five 10-minute interviews by current faculty, then lunch. I will say one big difference between PA school and residency interviews is it's much more of a two-way interview, with them selling the program to you and you selling yourself as a candidate. I imagine PA school is so competitive that those adcoms don't see the need to do that. Did you apply w/o PANCE scores (or contingent on completing it correct?) Correct. I applied without having taken the PANCE, and even got my offer before I had my scores back. I'm not sure if having scores in-hand (or exceptional scores) is a factor in the selection process, but I'm anecdotal proof that they aren't required. But of course my acceptance was ultimately dependent on passing. (Continued below....)
  5. The University of Colorado School of Medicine and Childrens Hospital Colorado are pleased to announce that applications for our Inpatient Advanced Practitioner Fellowship are now being accepted. This is a 1 year program, open to PAs and acute care NPs that combines diverse clinical and didactic experiences to help prepare new or recent graduates looking for a career in an inpatient pediatric specialty. More information can be found at: http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicalschool/departments/pediatrics/meded/fellowships/app-fellowship/Pages/default.aspx We enrolled our first cohort October 15th and are now recruiting for next year's cohort. Currently, there are two slots per cohort, although we hope to expand to four soon. While this is a new program, it was developed by critical care and hospital medicine faculty that have been training APPs to work in our environment for many years. Post-graduate training isn't for everyone, but we believe that there are talented, intereste new graduates who may lack the experience or exposure to land a career in a tertiary care academic pediatric medical center and we want to help them get there. Please use the contact address through the web site for inquiries, or post here and I will do my best to answer. Chris
  6. Well, I've decided for certain that I am going to do an EM residency. My fiance and I have discussed this at length and he's fully in support, but with a caveat that he needs to be making more money to make up for my temporarily lost income first. Also, we are getting married in September of this year so we need to get that done first! He's an airline pilot and will be experiencing very sizable raises as he gains seniority in the upcoming months/years so I'm not worried that he won't be able to make up for my income, and I suspect that I would be able to start sometime around summer/fall of 2020 or maybe early 2021. That said, I'd like to make my application as competitive as possible. I have the impression that there is less competition for most residences than there is for PA school, but I am sure that will continue to change with time. I would hate to be building up to this plan and find myself behind the curve. I'm looking for input from anyone who has done any residency, and specifically EM of course. I work as a hospitalist currently, trying to pick up some UC or family medicine per diem work. What can I do to bolster an application? I am hoping to hit up the SEMPA EM bootcamp this summer and also plan to attend their conference next year. I don't know the likelihood that I'll be able to find EM work as someone who works full time in another specialty and has no EM experience outside of rotations in school, but if I have an opportunity I'll take it. Otherwise, just looking for ideas...
  7. I’ve been having some discussions about doing a CCM residency at my institution after completing my residency. Everyone seems interested in me doing it. A few things would have to be altered such as my current residency would have to be extended 4 months (for a total of 22 months) to coincide with the start of the fellowship, which they also seem interest in doing. In exchange I would also get more elective time. I’d prefer this over doing locums so it would be a simple transition, but isn’t necessary. The CCM residency is a year long and pays about 7-10k more than I make now (which isn’t much lol), so in total I’ll have done just shy of 3 years post grad training. The talks are going that I would eventually split my time between CCM and EM like the docs with 6 shifts per month in the ED and 1 week per month in the unit. It would be more for management of the various ICU patients (rotate through Cvicu, micu, snicu, picu, and other areas) as I’ve already learned the majority of the procedures, though I would learn bronscopy and percutaneous trachs. Pros: I think it would just be cool to be, I think, the first formally dual trained EM-CCM and truly fellowship trained PA. it would be nice to have the variety of working CCM and EM. I have more GI bill to use to supplement my income, which pay about 1900 per month. it would help with my PSLF. The less I’m paid the less I pay them, and finding a non-profit to work for in EM with all the groups is hard. maybe could led to some consultancy work establishing residencies elsewhere? Or maybe speaking/lecturing/podcasts for EMRAP? Con: another year putting off settling down, renting a so so house, thoughts? Should I just go straight to work? Am I overinflating the pros?
  8. The University of California San Francisco (UCSF) - Fresno Emergency Medicine PA Residency is accepting applications for the 2019 application cycle. This 18-month postgraduate program, affiliated with the UCSF School of Medicine, is designed to prepare PAs to practice in a variety of emergency medicine environments. We will be accepting 2 residents in 2019. The class will start June 26, 2019 but we will be offering rolling admissions into the Fall for accepted applicants who have a later PA school graduation date. Deadline to apply is January 15, 2019. Rotations include: Trauma Critical Care Pediatric Emergency Medicine Burn Orthopedics Dermatology Ophthalmology Oral Maxillofacial Surgery Toxicology Emergency Ultrasound Anesthesia EMS  Resuscitation courses include: ACLS, ATLS, BLS, PALS 18-month stipend: $90,000 Benefits include medical, dental, vision, life insurance, disability insurance, 401k, employee assistance program, 4 weeks of vacation, membership in the Society of Emergency Medicine Physician Assistants (SEMPA), UCSF email access, textbook, malpractice coverage, and more. Paid travel to SEMPA 360, SEMPA's annual conference. Our state-of-the-art ED at Community Regional Medical Center serves as the only Level 1 Trauma Center/Burn Center for Central California, and handles an annual ED volume of over 110,000. The Department of Emergency Medicine hosts fellowships in Emergency Ultrasound, Medical Education, and Wilderness Medicine. Our faculty are involved in EMS, wilderness medicine, ultrasound, medical education, toxicology, international emergency medicine, and more. They are also leaders in the emergency medicine and EMPA community. For more information, please see the attached flyer. Website: http://www.fresno.ucsf.edu/emergency-medicine-physician-assistant/ Email: em.pa.residency@fresno.ucsf.edu Residency Flyer.pdf
  9. Has anyone located statistics on salary differences between PA's who did a residency vs. those who haven't? I would like to write a my next blog post on this topic but I am having trouble finding information. Any help is welcomed.. even if you just list the advantages/disadvantages you experienced/observed with a residency. Thanks!!!!
  10. UNM EMPA RESIDENCY: The University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine is excited to announce that we are accepting applicants now for our 2019-2020 class. Applications will close Feb 1st, 2019. Our class will start the last week of June, 2018 for an 18-month program for 2 residents. This year we have expanded our eligibility to applicants graduating an ARC-PA accredited program prior to May 31st, 2019. We strive to equip physician assistants with the clinical experiences and didactic teaching that will enable them to practice high-quality, evidence based emergency medicine. Our graduates will have comfort and competence in the care of critically ill patients, the broad scope of emergent presentations, and the skills necessary to be leaders in their profession. Cirriculum (# of 4 week blocks) Dedicated Orientation Block (1) Adult ED, including dedicated longitudinal block in ED Resus Unit (8) Community ED (1) Peds ED (2) Medical ICU (1) Surgical ICU (1) Combined US/Anesthesia (1) Cardiology (1) Orthopedics (1) Toxicology (1/2) OB/GYN (1/2) Electives (2) Salary/Benefits: $57,000 yearly salary Access to health, vision, dental, disability insurance with employer matching Contribution to retirement Paid Vacation Paid travel and registration SEMPA 360 conference SEMPA membership $500 per year CME allowance ATLS, FCCS, and dedicated airway course in orientation Setting: New Mexico's only level 1 trauma center, academic hospital and children's hospital Tertiary referral center for large rural state, with high acuity patients Easy access to outdoor activities, climbing, biking, skiing, as well as wonderful food and culture Nationally recognized faculty in EMS, Critical Care, Wilderness Medicine, Simulation and many other areas Applications Open: October 1st, 2018 Applications Close: February 1st, 2019 Website: http://emed.unm.edu/education/prospective-applicants/physician-assistant-residency-in-emergency-medicine.html E-mail: cpkalan@salud.unm.edu
  11. Can PA's do a residency in another country? And would they be able to practice their certification in that country, should they decide to move to that country??
  12. Hi all, I haven't seen much on the forums about people completing a residency after already working. I've been in hospital medicine since I graduated two years ago and I do enjoy my job, but my hope has been to get into critical care/emergency medicine at some point. I think I could likely do that in my area without too much difficulty, but now that I've seen what 'on the job training' really amounts to typically, I am concerned that I'd get pigeon-holed into fast track or something because of the lack of training I'd receive. My fiance and I don't have children (yet, maybe never), and I'm still young enough (early-mid 30s) that I have many years of practice left. I think the extra training, knowledge, and experience would be worth it for the enrichment of my continued career. Has anyone here done a residency after working? or know anyone who has?
  13. Hi all, I'm graduating PA school tomorrow and taking my PANCE in a week (wooooo!). I'm highly motivated to pursue a career in emergency medicine, particularly rural EM, and interviewed at multiple programs this summer. Unfortunately, I did not get into a program that felt like the right fit for my goals, so I've decided to reapply to more of the quality programs with open applications this fall. Most of these residencies don't start until late next spring or summer. Here's the issue: that would leave me with a minimum 7 month gap in employment, and up to 10 or 11 months, before starting a residency. That's terrifying! As far as I can tell, here are my only options, none feeling all that great: 1. Find a non-clinical job to fill the time/money gap. I have a job offer with an EMR implementation & consulting company that is OK with my timeline, but I fear I would lose so much knowledge if I'm not actually practicing what I've learned these last two years. Also, this might reflect poorly on my applications this fall. 2. Locum tenens work, ideally in urgent care or EM, but may have to do family med for a bit. I'm not really comfortable with this, as I've read on here that locums might be a pretty terrible idea for a new grad. The last thing I want to do is be in an unsafe environment, but somehow this feels like the better option. 3. Take an urgent care or EM job, not disclosing my plans to leave (who would hire me otherwise?). This feels dishonest and I'm least comfortable with this idea. I think it'd be terribly rude to leave any clinic/ED in such a short period when they've put in the effort to train a new grad. Am I off base with that? I could also work somewhere for a few years then reapply, but we all know how life goes; I'd rather do the hard work now before family/house payment/etc are deterrents. I'm really stuck on this and hoping that the experienced crowd here could impart some wisdom in my process. I'd really appreciate any advice!
  14. Hi all, I will be starting PA school in January and was looking for guidance about what path I should take to achieve my goals. If I could start over I might have chosen a different route to get to this point but I graduated with a Bachelors of Biology from Ohio State, went on to gain my patient care experience as a CNA, and applied for PA school. I really want to do something with babies so I am looking at Women's Health/OBGYN. What is the best path to take to get a job working closely with delivery and babies? I know PA's are up and coming and at least in NC are not often hired in most fields working with infants. Finding a Neonatal PA job is like finding a needle in a haystack. Heck even a neonatal PA residency is few and far between. And I am considering labor and delivery but after working nights in the hospital, I like more of the clinic setting. Plus I have never shadowed in L&D so I am not sure what the job specifically entails from the provider standpoint. So that left me considering a Women's Health Clinic. I shadowed a PA in one of these clinics and I loved it but after some research it does not seem there is much opportunity in clinics for OBGYN PA's and most clinics prefer NP's. So I wanted to ask some PAs who are currently out in the workforce and have wanted to work with newborns what their experience was like, how they found the position, and what they did to get there. What would be the best way to make myself competitive for an OBGYN PA provider position and what is the best way to find job openings in that field? Should I seek out an OBGYN residency after school or should I focus on real world job experience doing something that maybe doesn't interest me as much to gain work experience? Are there other possible careers I am forgetting about that will allow me to practice as a PA and work with infants/delivery? I am also strongly considering pediatrics as another option which seems to be much more readily available to PAs but I have always been fascinated with the reproductive system so I appreciate the gynecological portion of women's health as much as I love obstetrics. Any advice would be greatly appreciated! I do not want to end up in the same position I did immediately after college where think about what I should have done differently if I could start over. I want to do it right the first time so I do not struggle to get into a field I love because I don't have a crucial experience in my toolbox. Any help is greatly appreciated! Thank you!
  15. Okay. So I have been having trouble finding a job out of PA school. I graduated in December. I applied to a few residencies and fellowships and made it to the final round of one of the residencies but ultimately was not chosen. (This process took 2.5 months of my life= 1.5 months waiting for the interview and 1 month waiting for the results). So now I am 7 months out of school and without a job. The biggest problem is that I struggle with confidence. I did very well on all my tests in school but I feel like 2 years in school wasn't enough for me to be ready to practice medicine. Unfortunately, all of the fellowships and residences have deadlines that have passed so I am trying to find a job that will be welcoming of a new grad and be training heavy. I have a few interviews/job offers but need some advice of which would be best for me. One job primary care. They will give me 1-2 weeks of shadowing the doctor then 2 months of working in the same clinic with the doctor who I can utilize for questions. After that time I would be solo at one of the clinics. Pay is okay 90k but job is in California which is kind of expensive. One job is Urgent care. Shadowing for maybe 1 month then would be solo "sometimes" at 2 of their locations. But able to call doc at other locations if I have a question. Better pay and benefits than the primary care job. But I have read on the forum that Urgent care may not be the best for a new grad to start in. One jobs is endocrinology (I am scared this may be too specific for my first job and I may not be able to get out of this specialty if I end up not liking it). Any advice of which I should take if offered the position (knowing that I am a new grad who struggles with confidence)? I wish there were more residencies and fellowships for pAs! Thanks!
  16. So apparently Nova Southeastern University is starting an online emergency medicine certificate program as an alternative to doing a residency. The program is 1 year long, and the inaugural class will start this Fall. It is 18 credits and tuition costs $10,800. One full weekend of onsite training is required. https://osteopathic.nova.edu/certificates/emergency-medicine-certificate.html What do you guys think? Obviously not as good as a real residency, but does it get a new grad significantly closer to an ER job? Is there a place for online "residencies"?
  17. Has anyone completed the EM fellowship at U of Missouri and are you willing to share your experiences?
  18. The EMPA Fellowship at ARMC is currently accepting applications for its next class, which is set to begin in Nov of 2018. This Fellowship is housed at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center which is San Bernardino Counties Trauma and Burn Center located in the city of Colton, CA. The program includes clinical and didactic education that is designed to provide PAs who are new-grads or new to emergency medicine an efficient and supportive training experience that will enable top-of-scope practice in any emergency department. In addition to over 40 hours of online EM education, Fellows will attend 4-5 hours of weekly lecture that is specifically designed to build upon primary PA education. Fellows are also strongly encouraged and paid to participate in weekly EM physician resident lecture. Rotations include: Ortho Surgery (Trauma, SICU, Burn) Pediatrics Ob/Gyn Ultrasound Anesthesia Diabetic Youth Camp EMS The program now offers two options: 1. 14-month Traditional track ($55,000) Over 60 EMPAs have graduated from the Traditional track and report being very well prepared to practice in a wide variety of ED settings. 2. 20-month Doctorate of Medical Science track ($75,000 w/tuition paid) This is a new offering that builds on the Traditional track through a partnership with Lynchburg College in Virginia. The EMPA Fellowship is lengthened to enable time to complete the DMSc coursework, and the tuition is paid by the Fellowship. There are a select number of positions available for this option, and they will be filled competitively. There are currently 12 Fellows enrolled in the DMSc track. All Fellows are eligible for a full benefits package including Health, Vision, Dental, 401k. All lectures are CME certified providing more than 200 hours of CME. SEMPA and CAPA memberships are provided. EMPAFellowship.com Deadline for application is June 15, 2018 Please visit the website and select Apply Now to be contacted by our program recruiter and to learn more about the complete application process.
  19. The situation: Hey folks, I am just a few months out from graduation and I feel like I am about to make a big career decision that will shape the next stage of my life. I want to practice in EM and my intention one year ago was to go to a residency program after graduation. I have been accepted into one program and have interviews at two others already which is very exciting. At the same time I have been in contact with a recruiter and the Army is looking very good at the moment with the training opportunities they can provide (EM residency in Texas, TCCC courses etc.) Finally, after hanging out with residents on clinical rotations for the past year I am feeling envious of where they are and thinking about going back to full on med school. Some Possible options: 1. EM PA residency- I don't know if this needs to be justified on this form. There are obvious trade offs that come with this, but significant rewards. Upon graduation from such a program I would likely seek employment in MT, ID or AK in a small rural trauma center, ski and hunt elk extensively. 2. Army-> PA residency down the road- Understanding the deployment implications and intrinsic sacrifices, the training opportunities here are particularly unique. It is something that I have always been interested in, and my background before PA school had some parallels to the culture of the Army. ( I also see guard/ reserve as a way to blend this in and still keep some options open.) The AD route also opens up GI bill funding to pay for med school too. 3. Lucrative urgent care to save for med school- I have been offered an urgent care job for $130 k/yr for working 15 shifts per month with a doc whom I respect very much. This would build up the bank in a big way for a future med school option, and get me experience as a PA, while still giving me some experience as a PA in EM if I choose to not pursue med school. I could also take some of that extra income and put it towards extra training like POCUS courses, ATLS, or even paramedic certification. The goal: To be a bad mo fo. To have opportunities practicing an extensive scope of EM in many different settings not limited to overseas, rural, remote settings, and high acuity trauma centers. Any thoughts would be appreciated, though I am thankful to this forum for allowing me to think out loud. -E
  20. FYI for my prior service colleagues: I’m in the process of finalizing, but it appears you can use 100% Institution of Higher Learning GI Bill benefits (not the “apprenticeship” 80% and tapering pay) during residency. I’m choosing to use the Montgomery GI Bill since it gives more money than the BAH of post 9/11 for my area, and with no tuition it’s all money in my pocket. Really going to help make up for that income loss. Note: HPSP and those who direct commission with loan repayment cannot use the Montogomery GI Bill, only HSCP recipients who paid in. Another reason HSCP is better, in my opinion.
  21. Hello All! My Name is Jordan, and I am a current PA Fellow(resident) in the Emergency Department at Albany Medical Center. I decided to create this on-going discussion as I found one of these useful when I was considering applying for residencies/fellowships. From here on out I'll refer to the program as a fellowship because it is annoying to type /residency. In case you didn't know, they are the same thing as far as PA's go, its basically just whatever your institution wants to call it. I'm sure we will spend many hours at the conference some year deciding between the two. I digress Currently I am about a month and a half into the program and it has been a blast. We (the other fellow and I) pretty much jumped right in to the action of the Albany Med ED right off the bat. We had a short orientation and shadowing experience and were walked through a few patient care scenarios our first few days, as we waited for our first rotation to start...Ultrasound. Ultrasound was two weeks and it was amazing the amount of skill that could be acquired during that short time. I accumulated nearly 200 scans during that period. Ultrasound will be one of the most useful tools for me as I plan to go rural when I finish my year here in Albany. The instructor for the course was Dr. Beth Cadigan, an attending in the ED/ Ultrasound guru. She was great to learn from and patient with each individuals learning curve (us fellows and 1st year ED residents), she stated several times that it took her awhile to acquire US skill, which was probably related to her being the worst kid on the street at video games! We spent 2 weeks in the ED ultrasounding willing participants, several hours in the simulation lab receiving training, and individual time with online US lectures. We are currently on our Radiology rotation, mostly spending time in a radiology suite looking at chest films. As for rotations, next we will enter Ophthalmology, and subsequently Pediatrics (ED), and then in no particular order, SICU, EMS, Trauma, Toxicology, electives, interspersed between all of these are ED shifts. I believe total AMC ED shift time will be around 7-8 months. I'll finish today with a comment about the faculty in the AMC ED. They have been AWESOME! The attendings, PAs, and residents have been great to work with and willing to take time to teach. Any questions, just ask. Be back soon!
  22. The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine is proud to announce the newest addition to its medical education programs. The UCSF Fresno Emergency Medicine PA Residency is accepting applications for the 2018 application cycle. This 18 month post-graduate program is designed to prepare PAs to practice in a variety of emergency medicine environments. We will be accepting 2 residents in 2018. Deadline to apply is January 15, 2018. Rotations include: Trauma Critical Care Burn Orthopedics Dermatology Ophthalmology Oral Maxillofacial Surgery Toxicology Radiology Emergency Ultrasound Anesthesia EMS Resuscitation courses include: ACLS, ATLS, BLS, PALS 18-month stipend: $90,000 Full Benefits Paid attendance at SEMPA 360, SEMPA's annual conference Our state-of-the-art ED at Community Regional Medical Center serves as the only Level 1 Trauma Center and Burn Center for Central California, and handles an annual ED volume of over 110,000. For more information, please see the attached flyer. Website: http://www.fresno.ucsf.edu/emergency-medicine-physician-assistant/ Email: em.pa.residency@fresno.ucsf.edu Residency Flyer.pdf
  23. I’m a current clinical year student who will be done in August. I have a lot of interest in surgery, mainly orthopedics, but really like the OR in general. I was wondering if any surgical residency grads out there could chime in on your residency program, if you think it’s worth considering for a new grad right out of school, and maybe some of the requirements/factors programs take heavily into consideration. I’m considering both surgical residencies and ortho specific residencies. I like the idea of a residency because of the obvious learning experience and great opportunities it would provide. However, there aren’t any residencies in the area I go to school (Indianapolis, IN) which is also where I’m from. I say this not because I wouldn’t be willing to move for a year, but because it’s where I see myself working. Therefore, I’m concerned I’d be at a disadvantage not being from the area where the residency is. There are some threads that somewhat touch on what I’m asking, but to be honest most are pretty outdated so I figured I’d try to get some fresh perspectives. Thanks in advance for any input/advice!
  24. I am hoping to get a sense from a variety of EM residency grads what their experiences were like at their jobs after residency. Specifically, were you able to get the hospital/group to credential you for procedures that other PA's in the group don't do, and is your scope of practice reflective of your training? Did you work at a place that had never had a residency trained grad before? Did you find it was easier to negotiate a higher salary than your peers? I'm considering going back for a residency, but I've honestly never worked in a place where PA's have a wide scope of practice, so I'm curious if you're required to seek out those jobs and thus relocate, or if you were able to negotiate your expanded scope of practice because of your residency training.
  25. Hey guys, I’m a second year PA student graduating in December (PANCE in January). I’ve always planned on doing an EM residency and now is the time I finally get to apply. I picked about 6 residencies to apply to. I was wondering if anyone knows how many applicants the programs are getting now that they are gaining popularity. I did well in PA school (pending last two rotations) and worked as a tech in the ED prior to PA school. A lot of the programs are only accepting 2 residents per cycle and it has me a little concerned. Thanks for the responses in advance
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