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PTA vs Scribe for HCE?


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#21 simply dave

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 07:57 PM

Just a quick update in case anyone is wondering.  

 

My top pick for schools: says Scribe > PT aide

2nd pick: Scribe doesn't even count.  PT aide does as well as ophthalmic technician.  

3rd pick: Scribe doesn't even but.  PT aide does as well as ophthalmic technician.  

4th pick Scribe > PT aide > ophthalmic technician
 
I'm waiting to hear back from other schools.  
 
I'm leaning towards taking the ophthalmic technician job that will hopefully lead to the scribe job.  Also the ophthalmic technician job pays more and offers benefits/401k vs the PT aide job. 


#22 perezn1

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 05:39 PM

How does one become a scribe? 



#23 Jdabrowski

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 07:08 PM

How does one become a scribe? 

I checked on indeed.com for scribing jobs. I luckily found a private clinic which pays me much higher than large scribe programs and I get to be much more involved. I do not believe there is any certification you need to do for this, but it is helpful to have a background in medical terms, and I will say having a pharmacy background before this I know the drugs, the doses, and what they are prescribed for. Spelling most of the drugs is the bigger problem. Just start with googling Scribe positions in your area. Hope this helps! As much as people bash on being a scribe you get a lot out of it if you put in the time to learn and ask questions. This has been an insightful experience in my book, and I am VERY glad I have the opportunity to do this.


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#24 Jdabrowski

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Posted 12 April 2017 - 07:15 PM

Former ER scribe/current PA student here. If I had to do it all over, I would hands-down be a scribe again. This was the best pre-PA school job I could have ever asked for. As a scribe, you gain insight into the medical decision making of a healthcare provider that no other experience offers.

 

Just like any other job, as a scribe, you get out of it what you put into it. I told the physicians I worked with that I wanted to learn as much as possible --- so they taught me how to interpret labs, EKG's, x-rays, etc. After the physician looked at the EKG, they would hand it to me and ask me what I thought. If a patient was wheezing, they would say, "come over here and take a listen to this person's lungs and tell me what you hear. What tests do you think I'll order?" For two years, I strived to learn something new from every patient encounter, and I never hesitated to ask questions if I didn't understand the provider's train of thought. 

 

By the time I started PA school, I already had a basic knowledge of differential diagnoses for just about any complaint. I already knew the doses and indications for common drugs. After spending literally thousands of hours attached at the hip with an ER doctor, I had already been exposed to the presentation, work-up, and treatment for a variety of diseases and injuries. Yes, I still have plenty to learn. But I have a very solid foundation on which to expand my knowledge. 

 

I am not saying that hands-on experience isn't valuable --- it certainly is. But I firmly believe scribing can be outstanding preparation for PA school if you're willing to make the most out of it. 

I wish I could like this post all over again! I was literally told by two people that my hours in scribing would not account for much, but have followed the same path as you and since I have started my doc has guided me through interpreting lab results, EKG's, Xrays, etc and I have had to help him in very minor procedures by holding equipment while he was cutting something etc. I also have a very decent background in pharmacy so this part was easy for me to know the drugs, what they are used for, how they are dosed, and was even able to remind my doc that some of these medications are in liquid form or could be compounded easily. As an extra I volunteer in a hospice center and assist in feeding, clothing, and bathing pts and follow one around who has severe dementia so she doesn't get into other rooms etc.


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#25 Dmurphe18

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 01:29 PM

Hello, I am currently working as a cushion orthotic fitter and retaking classes trying to apply for the 2018 year, I fit orthotic equipment like back knee and ankle braces as well as regularly collaborate with doctors about patient best interest, would this count as good patient contact experience? I don't want to waste my time if this will not help me in the long run. I also have a very low gpa of 2.6 and a 2.5 bio gpa. Are my chances realistic for being a pa? Any feedback is very appreciated thank you!
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