ndpa09

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About ndpa09

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  1. New grad ID PA here! I started in August and it has definitely been a steep learning curve, which I'm sure would be expected in area specialty. Currently, I see many of the inpatient follow ups in the morning with clinic in the afternoon. In clinic I'm seeing mostly hepatitis C patients, HIV patients/patients on PrEP and some hospital follow up. It's definitely a great field with many interesting cases!
  2. I was always horrified as a student when I would walk into a room and see a little old lady sitting by herself (not knowing her social hx). Of course they could barely climb up onto the exam table. I couldn't help but wonder how they had got to their visit that day...
  3. And that FP attending gets talked down to by a cardiologist and so on....sense a trend?
  4. See, this whole thing is silly. We need a name change.
  5. I don't think CC is in any way detrimental to your pursuit of PA school. I think there are many CC that offer quality education and recently many people are beginning to utilize them, especially for generals, due to their relatively lower cost. With that being said, you will need a bachelor's degree before getting into 99% of PA schools. Your grades will be the most important factor for getting into PA school, not where you took the classes or what university awards you your degree.
  6. Exactly this. I would also suggest testing all the college students who are receiving government grant and subsidized loans...... I can't imagine that would go over too well with middle to upper class families though. But no, let's continue to pick on the poor. I also see people trying to cite the national deficit as a legit reason for such a policy..but there have been countless reports that the cost of testing is actually a waste with the low yield of positive screens.
  7. A few years ago scribing was heavily looked down upon as HCE on here (EMEDPA)...I never understood why. I worked as both an ER tech and a scribe but being a scribe was by far the best medical experience I had. Typically as a scribe we would see about 16 patients a day - that's seeing first hand 16 different pt presentations, H&Ps, lab orders - all while documenting them gaining valuable EMR experience. I had a handful of classmates who were scribes and to my knowledge they all did very well in school and had a ton of clinical experience to draw on, in terms of patients and things they had seen in the past. If you are familiar with the basic things you can pick up as a scribe (common labs, meds, medical terms etc.) then it makes it so much easier to take the next step and start interpreting things and putting everything together. ClapperJoe, while a little of the top, will probably be well prepared and hit the ground running in PA school. While his peers who were CNAs may not even know what a cmp is or what it consists of. Or how to construct a decent SOAP note. Those small things help. Outside of being a nurse, paramedic, or perhaps a RT I think being a scribe is the best experience you can have going into PA school or medical school for that matter.
  8. This description alone is actually really interesting. I think the attitude amongst your colleagues says a lot about them as well as the candidate they support. I also feel, with great certainty, I can assume which candidate it is they support, which speaks to the sad, sad state of our society and political state in general. With that said, as a student I recently had a doc as a preceptor who was very vocal about a particular candidate. He would go off in the doctor's lounge and didn't even care who was listening. Ironically enough, he was trying to convince a middle eastern physician to support his candidate even though that physician had said he was afraid he'd be kicked out of the country if he won lol. One day my preceptor actually referred to the opposing candidate as a "see you next tuesday" and complained about them raising his taxes. I was pretty shocked and lost a lot of respect for him. Unfortunate though because he was a great teacher.
  9. I'm glad I am not the only one. I literally laughed out loud for about 2 minutes.
  10. I think your stats looks good.. if you have a solid personal statement and good LORs and you'll get plenty of interview offers. Focus on preparing for interviews - practice! Make sure you're comfortable answering questions about yourself/experiences, why you chose X school, what you can bring to the program etc.. You want it to flow smoothly, but not come across rehearsed. Good luck!
  11. I don't think anyone in this thread has advocated skipping mandatory classes. Where is that comment even coming from? I'm pretty sure the purpose of this thread was to essentially discuss the necessity of mandatory attendance - which I think is fair. After all this is a message board.... If someone learns better by independently going through a recorded lecture with the ability to immediately rewind to a section they didn't understand why not allow that? Or, you can have that person sit through 4 hours of lecture and get absolutely nothing out of it. Wouldn't you want your students the learn the material in the most efficient and effective way possible? I feel like that should be the main goal of any educator.... The great thing about not having a mandatory class is that people who do learn best by going to class.... can still go to class! But since they learn best that way, everyone should have to do it? Personally, I can re-listen to a 50 minute lecture in about 20 minutes, then make a second pass over the material in the time it would have taken me to sit through the entire 50 minute lecture. That's what works best for me and it's frustrating I can't just do that from the get go. It saves me time and I stay focused that way. If the only way a program can teach professionalism is by requiring attendance then that program is doing their students a disservice. Quick example of how silly mandatory attendance can be- in my program we takes classes right along side our medical student counterparts. We had our first respiratory exam on a Friday but that Thursday morning we were scheduled for 3 hours of lecture material, which would be on the second respiratory exam...2 weeks later. When I got to class there were about 10 medical students there, and guess where the rest were? In the library studying for our test the next day. Then of course we had more mandatory classes we had to attend until 5 PM. Guess who had the higher average when we took that first respiratory exam?
  12. It would be illegal for your school to deny you acceptance into the program based on your medical history. Like others have mentions, just make sure you disclose you are taking that medication prior to the drug screen. Additionally, I would recommend NOT discontinuing your medication prior to PA school. It's a very stressful environment and requires an adjustment time. See how things go after a few weeks and go from there... Best of luck!
  13. Interesting read about the job satisfaction among physicians. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/806779-overview
  14. Exactly. Unlike as a physician....good luck with that career change after 8+ years post graduate and a ton of loan interest...... I think another interesting point would be to compare the job satisfaction between both PAs and MD/DO.