greenmood

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greenmood last won the day on September 22 2013

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About greenmood

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    Physician Assistant

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  1. I think the second and third options in your poll are the same, and the "correct" answer. I completed my post-bacc courses partly on a campus with a formal post-bacc program (but not as part of that program) and partly at a community college. Just do well and no one will care.
  2. If I remember correctly, it depends on if you catch the right moment in the cycle of the medical board. So I graduated in May 2013 and my start date was in August. The board didn't meet again until September, so I worked under a temporary license until I was approved the next month. I believe they meet every other month.
  3. At some point, you will realize you need to stop picking around at taxes and math and just start throwing hunks of money at the loan companies. As my pal Dave says, if you were clever at math you wouldn't be in this mess to start. ;) If you had enough money for the tax implications of student loan repayment to really affect you, you would just pay off the loans and be done with it.
  4. This is about how we do it, too. I rarely leave early, but I also rarely leave late. Technically, OP, as an exempt employee you may be required to "work until the work is done." In practice that's not acceptable if it routinely requires you to stay late. If I was leaving a half hour late every single day I would be going to my supervisors to discuss how we might streamline the day a little better to get me out of there on time. The lunch break thing is a little different. I eat when I can, and that's sometimes at my desk doing paperwork. I would not kick up a fuss about that, but that's just me. If I never got a single second to eat lunch, ever, I'd be back with my supervisors again working on time management and prioritization.
  5. Talk to HR and get the official policy in writing, read it, and then come back ready to discuss. I don't think it's ridiculous that a hospital counts RN experience, but I do think if they're going to do that they absolutely must count your (and others') prior healthcare experience with equal weight. Does that mean you suddenly make more than the NP with 10 years nursing experience? Not necessarily, but it should at least be fair across both professions. And your experience as a provider in the field should definitely be weighted more than nursing and EMT experience. I got about 6-7K more per year starting salary as a new graduate due to my years of experience as a physical therapy aide, and my NP colleagues got money for nursing experience. Non-provider healthcare experience is weighed equally. The experienced providers got more than us, and those with no healthcare experience got less. That seems fair to me.
  6. Some good points here. I just want to add/reiterate that nothing you've described (the baby, the charting, the obese 11yo) amounts to anything close to negligence. I've gotten an impression from your posts that part of you thinks you might have done something wrong with these cases. That's not true. You should try to remember that, no matter which route you go with the employer. Don't let anyone smell blood in the water.
  7. The volunteer hours are not going to make or break your application. Volunteering looks best when it is lots of hours sustained over a long period of time. Meaning you actually have a relationship with a volunteer organization that you care about. 30 hours randomly thrown at a hospital doesn't matter. If you're set on applying with no healthcare experience, I would just do it early and update your application later.
  8. You did something unacceptable and there was a consequence - the school is calling it an "academic penalty." In my opinion, the academic penalty you took counts as discipline by the school for a conduct violation. In the step 1 description, they even use the word "violation." If that is a direct reference to a written conduct policy, you have your answer.
  9. Don't bring this up. You're borrowing trouble for no reason.
  10. Go to Florida. And find a way to be excited about it. You can return to the midwest when you graduate. Keep your contacts fresh and stay on the lookout for job opportunities.
  11. Minnesota. You can have your pick on a scale of rural to metropolis. We do have snow in winter, but you will learn to like it.
  12. Four years ago when I was looking in Chicago it was terrible. So many new grads. My offers there were all in subspecialty surgery, and I remember turning one down only to find that they offered it to a classmate literally the next day. They just have lines of applicants and they WILL find someone foolish or desperate enough to take the crap offer. Neurosurgery, running an epilepsy ward at night, for less than 70K per year. Ridiculous. I moved.
  13. Hm. I suppose my advice would be to list it. You should absolutely NOT get into why it was a brief employment on your resume though. List the necessary details and your start and end date. The goal of the resume is to get to the interview. When they ask during the interview be prepared with a good, succinct explanation. Your situation is tough because you weren't just "laid off" you were terminated. Don't lie about it. Turn it as positive as possible by describing what you've learned from the experience and how you intend to move forward. And then move on unless you're asked some follow up questions. No dwelling. I could easily see the flip side of this argument since it was such a brief employment. You didn't get very much "experience" from that job, when most of it was probably spent orienting. I'll be curious to see what other people think.
  14. I think it was wrong for the office manager to pretend they had no problem with it when the opposite was clearly true. On the flip side, you had only been there a week and were already asking about shadowing. Might have been too soon. Nice that you got good reactions from the doc and the PA but it sounds like the office manager didn't know you from Adam when you showed up asking to shadow, having already subverted their process by getting permission from the wrong source. I'm not excusing the way you were treated. Next time (and please, don't stop looking for opportunities) ask about policies and politics first. You might avoid squished administrative toes.
  15. Yikes. This is how you respond to working physician assistants who express an opinion you don't like? No thanks. Wow.