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"perfect job"-minimal acceptable salary


perfect job(hrs/benefits/etc...lowest salary you would take  

349 members have voted

  1. 1. perfect job(hrs/benefits/etc...lowest salary you would take

    • 40k
      6
    • 50k
      14
    • 60k
      60
    • 70k
      155
    • 80k
      136
    • 90k
      71
    • >90k
      81


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so perfect full time job with all benefits and professional fees/dea/state license/cme/retirement/on site free child care, etc paid....how low is acceptable? assume walk to work and any reasonable benefit paid.

this is a hypothetical people so don't ask for specifics....

there has been a lot of interest in salaries lately so I wanted to get a sense of where folks sit with this....

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If EM and they are paying for experience, 105-110k

If EM and no experience, 85-90k

 

This is for three 12 hour shifts a week... anything more is gonna cost extra...

 

E, are you off to Scotland... and by the way, I met some PAs up in Downeast Maine, your dream job... they are making lousy money.

 

G

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If EM and they are paying for experience, 105-110k

If EM and no experience, 85-90k

 

This is for three 12 hour shifts a week... anything more is gonna cost extra...

 

E, are you off to Scotland... and by the way, I met some PAs up in Downeast Maine, your dream job... they are making lousy money.

 

G

 

canada is looking like an option too. if everything( and I mean everything) is covered I would work for 80 k for 7 24 hr shifts/month...if you want me to pay state licenses, dea, etc it goes up from there.....I talked to a pa in vt who makes around 90k with full benefits and a very low cost of living so that would be ok too....it would be very difficult to get my current salary at a rural er because they could afford a doc for what I make now so they need to pay a pa<100k ....if I can buy a house for 200k though it is a fair trade off

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Maybe I'm not reading this correctly, but wouldn't you expect a variety based on the level of experience? A new grad vs. a 10 yr PA have different ideas of what is acceptable.....I couldn't take <90 now.....

 

I guess it varies by life situation and debt as well. I have no debt other than my mortgage so I can take less than someone with 50k student loans and 2 car payments . also in this "perfect job scenario" any reasonable job related expense is paid....maybe even loan repayment yr for yr.....

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And enough time off to moonlight if so desired... :cool:

 

if you work 7 24 hr shifts/month and have 3 weeks paid vacation and a week paid cme that's lots of time off....not to mention the sabbatical you qualify for after 5 yrs....1/2 salary for 6 months to pursue an outside interest related to medicine(relief work, etc)-don't laugh-I got sabbatical benefit at my last job...it's out there .....

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Guest tmarkie
Maybe I'm not reading this correctly, but wouldn't you expect a variety based on the level of experience? A new grad vs. a 10 yr PA have different ideas of what is acceptable.....I couldn't take <90 now.....

 

Ditto. I think the poll should be broken down by experience.;)

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What folks don't seem to realize is that a great benefit package can add up to 20% over a base salary.(health care,vacation,malpractice,retirement contributions etc.) So...for those new graduates with a base of 65k and a really comprehensive benefit package the total package can be as much as 75K+. I always look at the total package just not the dollar amount in salary. Since I am currently contracting my services I make sure I charge enough to cover things like retirement, payed vacation etc.(>90k)

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  • 11 months later...

Anything less than 65k starting (with full benefits) is a joke.

 

Who is the one person starting at 40K? Have they ever had any kind of job before? Do they have student loans? Mortgage, car payments? I doubt it, they have no work experience in anything is my guess...this it their first job in life, it has to be...maybe it is not full time just a couple of days a week, yeah thats it...

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Anything less than 65k starting (with full benefits) is a joke.

 

Who is the one person starting at 40K? Have they ever had any kind of job before? Do they have student loans? Mortgage, car payments? I doubt it, they have no work experience in anything is my guess...this it their first job in life, it has to be...maybe it is not full time just a couple of days a week, yeah thats it...

 

I don't believe that a new grad should ever work for less than 72/yr. You are doing the same thing as a doctor and look how much they're getting paid!

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I don't believe that a new grad should ever work for less than 72/yr. You are doing the same thing as a doctor and look how much they're getting paid!

 

 

Unfortunately, a lot of it depends on where you live. SOmeone working in Mass may not expect less than 90-100k, but the same person in PA, WV or Ohio in a small town doing essentially the same job may think 65-70k is a good job.

 

You have to remember that reimbursement and cost of living are also huge factors. The reimbursement in Pittsburgh, PA isn't necessarily the same as Philly and so on.....obviously the same with COL.

 

Another factor would be job market competition. Living somehere with only 1 trauma center and a couple of small hospitals might make the ER job market tight if that is where you were set on living. Same thing is true if you are a new grad and live in an area with a lot of graduating PA students.

 

I think there are a number of other factors to take into consideration besides amount of experience.

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I don't believe that a new grad should ever work for less than 72/yr. You are doing the same thing as a doctor and look how much they're getting paid!

 

Easy, there.....the roles are blurred, and I believe 100% in the clinical capacity if PAs.....but new grads are NOT doing the same work as their SP in many fields.

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Easy, there.....the roles are blurred, and I believe 100% in the clinical capacity if PAs.....but new grads are NOT doing the same work as their SP in many fields.

 

 

This is true. And, the salaries in NY are not as high as some people want or expect them to be. I think if you high-ball expected salaries you will dissapoint many people. I heard of people leaving my hospital to make at least 20,000 more. First, I'm not sure I really believe it, and, in all honesty, I don't work very hard and, at this point, don't want to. I am in the mid 70's and I'm very happy. I have very good benefits and I'm extremely happy with my hours. I have not call, no weekends. I leave here at the end of the day and don't look back.

 

I had interviewed at a private hospital and they told me that they don't need to be unionized because their salaries are very competative. If I had taken this job in medicine, I would have been working 3 12 hour shifts and twice as hard for the same money I'm getting now. I didn't feel it was a good trade off.

 

I know the talk of salary can ignite people but I think we need to be realistic. I believe the starting base salary for newbies is about 60-65k.

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I know the talk of salary can ignite people but I think we need to be realistic. I believe the starting base salary for newbies is about 60-65k.

 

Are you assuming this for a specific geographic area or overall? If this applies to everywhere, I have to respectfully disagree with you. Low to mid-70s is not unreasonable for new grads considering the national mean is 71K for new grads...

 

http://physician-assistant.advanceweb.com/Common/editorial/Editorial.aspx?CC=92679

 

I know I am worth more than 60-65K...

 

G

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"I know I am worth more than 60-65K..."

 

G- you are worth AT LEAST that as a medic and much more as a pa.

the senior paramedics around here pull 65 k without overtime......

 

I hope so E... I was going to write a question a little later as I get closer to graduation but I am wondering what my medic experience is worth in the EM PA / trauma world job market... I'll save it for a few more months and then open it up.

 

G

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Unfortunately, a lot of it depends on where you live. SOmeone working in Mass may not expect less than 90-100k, but the same person in PA, WV or Ohio in a small town doing essentially the same job may think 65-70k is a good job.

 

You have to remember that reimbursement and cost of living are also huge factors. The reimbursement in Pittsburgh, PA isn't necessarily the same as Philly and so on.....obviously the same with COL.

 

Another factor would be job market competition. Living somehere with only 1 trauma center and a couple of small hospitals might make the ER job market tight if that is where you were set on living. Same thing is true if you are a new grad and live in an area with a lot of graduating PA students.

 

I think there are a number of other factors to take into consideration besides amount of experience.

 

I live in MA and came her as a new grad last year...starting salaries are NOT 90-100K! more like 70-80K. boston has HUGE, world-class teaching hospitals and many residdent programs, and so while PAs are valued and wanted and there are lots of jobs, there is also not a lot of incentive on the part of employers to hike the salaries up, partly b/c of the above, and partly b/c so many young people want to start their careers in big cities where they will get more advanced clinical experience, and where the action is....:D it's a supply and demand thing -- many PAs to choose from, not much need to sweeten the reimbursement pot.

 

unfortunately, at the big teaching hospitals where there are residents, most PAs are hired (at 70-80K to start) to run the floors, not 1st assist in the OR. some services (CT, for example) yes...but most, no.

 

I also graduated from PA school in NYC (and began my application process there, before we decided to go to MA),and starting salaries are also in the 68-70K range, except for a few ppl I know whol went into very busy surgery services for maybe 80 or 90K...but they were expected to work 60+ hrs/week.

 

so...PLEASE don't keep inflating these salaries b/c I've lived in both major NE cities, and I am telling you the truth! :cool:

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I live in MA and came her as a new grad last year...starting salaries are NOT 90-100K! more like 70-80K. boston has HUGE, world-class teaching hospitals and many residdent programs, and so while PAs are valued and wanted and there are lots of jobs, there is also not a lot of incentive on the part of employers to hike the salaries up, partly b/c of the above, and partly b/c so many young people want to start their careers in big cities where they will get more advanced clinical experience, and where the action is....:D it's a supply and demand thing -- many PAs to choose from, not much need to sweeten the reimbursement pot.

 

unfortunately, at the big teaching hospitals where there are residents, most PAs are hired (at 70-80K to start) to run the floors, not 1st assist in the OR. some services (CT, for example) yes...but most, no.

 

I also graduated from PA school in NYC (and began my application process there, before we decided to go to MA),and starting salaries are also in the 68-70K range, except for a few ppl I know whol went into very busy surgery services for maybe 80 or 90K...but they were expected to work 60+ hrs/week.

 

so...PLEASE don't keep inflating these salaries b/c I've lived in both major NE cities, and I am telling you the truth! :cool:

 

Agreed. I worked around NYC/metro area (before "retiring" to the pacific NW)....lots of 60s to 70s, mainly a consequence of factors mentioned above. Saturated market, new grads willing to work for beans......

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I hope so E... I was going to write a question a little later as I get closer to graduation but I am wondering what my medic experience is worth in the EM PA / trauma world job market... I'll save it for a few more months and then open it up.

 

G

a student of mine graduating this month just landed an em job( 3 twelve hr shifts/wk) for 50/hr with full benefits and a yr end production bonus. she has prior experience as a medical asst in primary care for > 10 yrs but no em experience outside of pa school. no it is not in a big city but aside from surgery none of the high paying jobs usually are.the place your medic experience will be worth a lot is to a practice( like mine) that has lots of pa's and favors prior em exposure. we have lots of prior medics on staff now as pa's and the only 2 new grads we ever hired were former medics. we may hire someone soon who has worked with us as an ed rn for > 10 yrs who is about to graduate from pa school. they wouldn't cover the dept solo at night for at least the 1st yr though.

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Are you assuming this for a specific geographic area or overall? If this applies to everywhere, I have to respectfully disagree with you. Low to mid-70s is not unreasonable for new grads considering the national mean is 71K for new grads...

 

http://physician-assistant.advanceweb.com/Common/editorial/Editorial.aspx?CC=92679

 

I know I am worth more than 60-65K...

 

G

 

 

Well, yeah, I guess I mean by region. The Advance data shows NY at a little more than 68k. I think our starting is around 60-65k, so, we are just below the NY mean. I still don't consider that terrible. And, the reason I bring up this point is because I don't think it's fair to increase the new grads exectations on what their salaries are going to be especially if they find their perfect job, like I did. My first interview was in a medical office who accepted worker's comp. Ideally, if a worker got hurt on the job, they would come to us before the ed for simple thinks like sutures. I was offered 24/7 call at $54,000. Not the perfect job and not worth the salary. Then, I found my job that I've been in for 9 yrs. The perfect job starting at 63,000. Wouldn't change it for the world.

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  • 2 months later...
Guest windycitigirl@a
You are doing the same thing as a doctor and look how much they're getting paid!

 

So? Isn't COST EFFECTIVENESS the whole point of having us around?

 

The doc would deserve every penny of it....their investment/risk is greater and I believe their reward should reflect that.

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Agreed. I worked around NYC/metro area (before "retiring" to the pacific NW)....lots of 60s to 70s, mainly a consequence of factors mentioned above. Saturated market, new grads willing to work for beans......

 

I've seen job listings in NYC for RN's and I swear, the pay was more! What's up with that??

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Please don't forget to include benefits with "salary"...

 

I.e... 40hrs per week with NO call... for $68k per year + $2,500 CME + 3-4 weeks PAID vacation in the right practice and state can be a "golden cow"...

 

Versus...

 

70 hours per week with call every 4th night... for $85k + $1,500 CME + 10 days Paid vacation in a congested town and Pro-NP/anti-PA state....;)

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