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Are Clinical Rotation Sites Biggest Source of First Job?


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Hi,

I am trying to plan for my future which includes intentions of following my SO after PA school for four years while she gets her PhD. My question is how much do I need to stress about my future school's ability to place me at clinical sites near that geographical area of interest (most likely out-of-state) where she will be going for grad school? What will dictate how likely I am to get my first job around where she lives? I know clinical rotations are an avenue through which new grads get their first jobs though I don't have a representative idea of how significant of a source that is. Obviously the state that she ends up being in for grad school will have their own PA programs with their own in-state clinical affiliations (as will more established programs in surrounding states) and I am worried that they will always get precedence over me within that state for clinical placement and resultantly, hiring priority. Also, I am curious as to how the school I went to, in general, will factor into this scenario as I am interested in a relatively new program.

I am really hoping that many will tell me it really doesn't matter that much for the most part because it has been extremely stressful realizing how many variables there are and their potential implications for my future. 

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PA programs often have students from all over the country. Some of them manage to get rotations back where they want to return. Others just relocate after graduation, regardless of where they went to school.

Don’t worry; as a new graduate, you can find a way to relocate to most areas of the country (unless they have tiny job markets.)


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I agree with UGo that barring a very tight local job market, new grads can get a job anywhere (easier if you have clinical experience prior to school).

In certain circumstances (competitive or high-intensity specialties - I'm thinking derm, CT surgery, critical care, ED), having rotated at a site is a real advantage in getting a job there. (or, substitute prior experience in that area before school). Because they know you, from your 'audition'.

For a typical job however (primary care, family practice, or a less-competitive subspecialty), it's not at all necessary to have rotated at that site, or even in the area. 

If you're new to the area, you might have to work a bit harder than an established local, to find a position, but it's very very do-able.

 

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I would agree with most of the above.

If you want to be in a specific competitive market or specialty - Very difficult without a foot in the door.

For what its worth, my first offer came from a rotation site. 

Had I wanted to stay near where I went to PA school, I could have nearly hand selected whatever job in almost any specialty I wanted. That is the power of a reputable program in an area of the country where PAs are well recognized, respected, and strongly desired. Unfortunately, I have had more difficulty because of significant other (whose unable to relocate) and family requiring me to move to a very high COL area with a competitive job market (in Colorado)

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I would have had an offer from a rotation site if I hadn't found a job before they got their ducks in a row.

The majority of my class did NOT get jobs from rotation sites.  Those of use working in specialties did find it helpful to have done rotations in those specialties as electives.

Frankly rotations sites usually ony lead to jobs if they have openings....very rarely would a site be able to create one for you.  Timing is everything.  On the whole I don't think rotations are the biggest source by any means.

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Currently picking my one and only elective  rotation. I had a few options but went with a more exclusive option of occupational medicine at General Motors. I will be their  first PA student at the location, and I hope it can transition into a possible job offer. However, I wonder if picking something more broad like ER or internal would have been a better educational option. 

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1 hour ago, PolakPA said:

Currently picking my one and only elective  rotation. I had a few options but went with a more exclusive option of occupational medicine at General Motors. I will be their  first PA student at the location, and I hope it can transition to a possible job offer. However, I wonder if picking something more broad like ER or internal would have been a better educational option. 

Occ med is a weird specialty.  I can almost guarantee you will never be unemployed, but while sometimes it's a very rewarding specialty, other times it's entirely frustrating in its stupidity. The world needs more dedicated, conscientious PAs in occ med!

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10 hours ago, rev ronin said:

Occ med is a weird specialty.  I can almost guarantee you will never be unemployed, but while sometimes it's a very rewarding specialty, other times it's entirely frustrating in its stupidity. The world needs more dedicated, conscientious PAs in occ med!

probably not a great first job though....

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