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UGoLong

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UGoLong last won the day on July 18

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About UGoLong

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    Physician Assistant

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  1. UGoLong

    Time of day for interview offers?

    Hey guys! Notifications are sent by people who work. They try to send them out during their workdays, but sometimes do it after work hours if they’re really busy. Patience, grasshopper! Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  2. UGoLong

    Is it worth it?

    There are many jobs that pay more than a PA. (I even had some.) If you find yourself fantasizing about having one of them, you might just be daydreaming or you might not be in the right job (no two are exactly the same) or career for you. Nothing wrong with that; disatisfaction sometimes can lead us to a better place. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  3. UGoLong

    The Waiting Game

    We are on our second interview day out of 5-6. Hang in there. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  4. My neighbor is a cardiologist. She practices under her maiden name and has for years. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  5. Wonderful! Your story is living proof that a few hours of actually doing something is better than months of ruminating. Best wishes! Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  6. UGoLong

    Considered vs. Invited Different?

    At our place, maybe 800 valid applicants for 50 seats. 4 or 5 days of 50 interviews per day. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  7. UGoLong

    Introduction post/advice!

    This is very true! Without clinical experience, you really can’t be sure working with patients is how you want to spend your life. Without decent shadowing, you really can’t be sure you really want the life of a PA. We often have exercise phys graduates in PA programs (not the most common degree, but it’s fine!) Ultimately you will need about 3 letters for most programs. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  8. UGoLong

    New Pre-PA AAPA Membership

    Call member services and ask. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  9. That was my point. You can’t practice medicine. You would be a civilian volunteer. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  10. You can volunteer, but not as a PA if you lack a state license or a collaborating physician. If you have some other designation (EMT or paramedic) active in that state, you may be able to practice at that level. Otherwise you can be a knowledgeable civilian. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  11. UGoLong

    New Pre-PA AAPA Membership

    One of the more productive things any professional society can do is welcome students and pre-students. Glad to see this. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  12. Saw this on Facebook this morning. Equally true for other practitioners: “For those who are afraid to become a nurse because they have a weak stomach,It won’t be the vomit or needles or blood or urine or feces that turns your stomach. You’ll get used to that. You’ll come to accept it’s just part of the job and get to the point where you’re thinking of the 38 different things you have to do while absentmindedly cleaning up a bowel movement. What will turn your stomach will be 40 shallow breaths a minute in a patient in respiratory distress. A freshly born infant that is limp and blue and hasn’t cried yet. Tripled troponin levels on your sweating and anxious patient as you realize they’re having a heart attack. Feeling cord during a cervical check, then trying to hide from your patient the shaking in your voice as you call for help. The pale skin of a Jehovah’s Witness with a hemoglobin of 4 as she declines a blood transfusion and says goodbye to her family because they haven’t found the source of the bleed and she’s running out of time. A blood alcohol level of .18 on a 4 year old who is barely responsive and being intubated after getting drunk on mouthwash and then hitting his head. An elderly woman in the ICU signing her DNR while her sobbing daughter begs her to reconsider, knowing if treatment is stopped then her mother will die. A child in the pediatric ICU who hasn’t had a visitor in months. Not being able to find the heartbeat on a pregnant mom who hasn’t felt the baby move in a while. In the face of everything else that comes with being a nurse, I promise you’ll get used to the poop.” - Andrea Pellerin Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
  13. Saw this on Facebook this morning. Equally true for other practitioners: “For those who are afraid to become a nurse because they have a weak stomach,It won’t be the vomit or needles or blood or urine or feces that turns your stomach. You’ll get used to that. You’ll come to accept it’s just part of the job and get to the point where you’re thinking of the 38 different things you have to do while absentmindedly cleaning up a bowel movement. What will turn your stomach will be 40 shallow breaths a minute in a patient in respiratory distress. A freshly born infant that is limp and blue and hasn’t cried yet. Tripled troponin levels on your sweating and anxious patient as you realize they’re having a heart attack. Feeling cord during a cervical check, then trying to hide from your patient the shaking in your voice as you call for help. The pale skin of a Jehovah’s Witness with a hemoglobin of 4 as she declines a blood transfusion and says goodbye to her family because they haven’t found the source of the bleed and she’s running out of time. A blood alcohol level of .18 on a 4 year old who is barely responsive and being intubated after getting drunk on mouthwash and then hitting his head. An elderly woman in the ICU signing her DNR while her sobbing daughter begs her to reconsider, knowing if treatment is stopped then her mother will die. A child in the pediatric ICU who hasn’t had a visitor in months. Not being able to find the heartbeat on a pregnant mom who hasn’t felt the baby move in a while. In the face of everything else that comes with being a nurse, I promise you’ll get used to the poop.” - Andrea Pellerin Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
  14. To become a PA, you have to have completed rotations in core areas, including surgery. You can go to the ARC-PA website and see what that entails. Some people come to school with fears, like will I pass out my first morning of gross anatomy? You might want another career path if this has stopped you from even taking prereqs. NP training gets badmouthed here sometimes because of their more limited clinical training, but it might suit you better. As I understand it, you can be, say, a family NP without setting foot in surgery. My guess is that the initial RN training part will still put you in hospitals however. Why not shadow in the hospital and see how real your fears are? Having to care for patients is different than watching them, hopeless to intervene and provide care. I wasn’t sure I could be an EMT and now I’ve completed 32 years in the field, the last 15 as a paramedic. Some fears are unfounded, but real until you face them and see. Good luck. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  15. It’s just ironic to me. I often tell people it was good to be an engineer when I was young and everything in our house would break and a PA in middle age (and later) because everything in me is breaking. When asked what I should study next in old age, I would joking say divinity or emblaming. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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