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Schooling after PA school


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Not me personally, but a friend of the family later went back and got a degree in software engineering. She now works for a very, very large EMR company (you can probably guess which one) in a clinical informatics position. She advises development teams on what hospitals need and she advises clinicians on how to better utilize the software.  I don't think she actually does any programming... she's more so the person who can "speak both languages". She makes good money and still does PRN jobs on the side. 

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I was just curious if anyone has done additional training after PA school such as an MBA, law degree, education, etc and what benefits/negatives they experienced. Thank you!

I attended one of the last (if not THE last) cert PA schools and did a post grad MSPAS at ATSU. I won't say it taught me anything new except for writing in APA style but it did reinforce a lot of what I learned/forgot from PA school. I think a residency would have been better

 

I don't know how helpful my post is to your question...

 

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I just finished my MHA degree less than a year ago. So far, it is nothing more than an expensive piece of paper. I am trying to transition to the administrative side of the business, but it has been slow so far.

 

As for the program/experience itself--everything after PA school has been cake in comparison. There are a lot of papers to write, but it is pretty common sense stuff.

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Think about what your end-game is before going back to school again. I finished my doctorate in physical therapy and then I went to complete my master's in nursing (going to get my board certification in family practice as a nurse practitioner). I was able to work part-time while in school which helped for cash flow and steady income. There are many cons (lost income from not working full time, being busier with academic obligations on weekends, social life is less, etc.). The pros? There are many. Depending on your degree, it opens up countless career opportunities. As a PT, RN, NP, etc. my options are endless. If you get an MBA, MHA, etc., that will be a great adjunct degree to being a PA. Ultimately, it gives you the ability to be flexible in your career. 

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I attended one of the last bachelor's programs for PA school.  I did a post grad MPAS at University of Nebraska (back when it only cost $3500) and just completed a doctorate in health science (DHSc) through Nova Southeastern.  The MPAS had a direct impact on my clinical practice.  Ohio required a master's in order to gain prescriptive authority for PAs in practice <10 years at that time.  The DHSc has so far done nothing for me (aside from the increased knowledge).  My goal is to go into administration or academics.  I thought since I am one of only 1.7% of PAs with a doctorate degree (per NCCPA) that I would be a hot commodity for said admin or academics jobs.   Yet, nobody has seemed to care when applying for these jobs. 

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Our program had a dual degree track; a MS/MPH that took 3 years instead of two. I remember just about all of them saying they regretted it and that it was an overpriced diploma that bought them no extra earning power.

 

Not sure where they are now.

 

Not knocking anyone who has gone back for additional schooling beyond our base degree. I personally never saw the economy in it. I think the only way I'd go back is if my loans were 100% paid off and I could pay cash or do a traditional doctorate program where it's funded.

 

Actually I'd like to go to gunsmithing school.

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Bottom line - do you NEED the degree to do what you want to do?  If yes, then get the degree.  If not, then don't. 

 

When I was considering going back to school I spent a long time considering an MPH - but the return on investment just wasn't there.  Thousands of dollars with no increased earning potential from my then current position when with some hard work, connection, and some luck I could have worked myself into the same positions I was considering with the MPH.  Needless to say I never pursued that route.  Eventually went to PA school - hard to work as a PA without the degree so it was necessary.

 

Do you need an MBA to invest or own a business?  Not necessarily.  Do you want to practice law?  Then you should probably get a law degree.  Do you need a degree in education to teach as a PA?  Not necessarily but there are some exceptions where it could open more doors for you.  If you're just doing it to gain knowledge that you want to have....there's nothing wrong with that but I'd have to really want to use my disposable income.

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I accepted a position as Director of Clinical Education at a PA program 2 years ago, finished up Nebraska bridge to masters degree this past May. Did the education track, which was immensely helpful because I could talk the language of education without getting a specific degree in that field.

I think the example of the PA getting a degree in computing is insightful, aim your further education where the demand is at.

I would also wonder if getting an actual degree vs getting a certificate ( a collection of classes and training that lead to a set of skills and knowledge) could be compared.

The certificate is usually available in health care admin and IT. Real question is what do you want to do with the extra training and what are your expectations concerning payback for further education or training?

George

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  • 3 months later...
On 6/8/2017 at 3:17 AM, dizzyjon said:

I attended one of the last bachelor's programs for PA school.  I did a post grad MPAS at University of Nebraska (back when it only cost $3500) and just completed a doctorate in health science (DHSc) through Nova Southeastern.  The MPAS had a direct impact on my clinical practice.  Ohio required a master's in order to gain prescriptive authority for PAs in practice <10 years at that time.  The DHSc has so far done nothing for me (aside from the increased knowledge).  My goal is to go into administration or academics.  I thought since I am one of only 1.7% of PAs with a doctorate degree (per NCCPA) that I would be a hot commodity for said admin or academics jobs.   Yet, nobody has seemed to care when applying for these jobs. 

Very useful info. I prob wont pursue a PhD further then. Have a MPH but a DrPh might be overkill later on.

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