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OK I haven't been on the forum for a while, so please be kind with your comments...

What is up with a doctor of nursing degree? I know a PA who got her doctorate too, and I don't get it. Go to medical school if you want to be called doctor! At least it's honest and not confusing.

I understand the concept of degree creep (where you have to have higher and higher degrees to do the same job that others have done for many years) but what is it for? I don't know any PA who got more money based on the letters behind their name. I know you have to have a master's for teaching or admin positions. But for a clinical job...? Really? Is it just a massive pissing contest?

Just had to rant a little.

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OK I haven't been on the forum for a while, so please be kind with your comments...

What is up with a doctor of nursing degree? I know a PA who got her doctorate too, and I don't get it. Go to medical school if you want to be called doctor! At least it's honest and not confusing.

I understand the concept of degree creep (where you have to have higher and higher degrees to do the same job that others have done for many years) but what is it for? I don't know any PA who got more money based on the letters behind their name. I know you have to have a master's for teaching or admin positions. But for a clinical job...? Really? Is it just a massive pissing contest?

Just had to rant a little.

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OK I haven't been on the forum for a while, so please be kind with your comments...

What is up with a doctor of nursing degree? I know a PA who got her doctorate too, and I don't get it. Go to medical school if you want to be called doctor! At least it's honest and not confusing.

I understand the concept of degree creep (where you have to have higher and higher degrees to do the same job that others have done for many years) but what is it for? I don't know any PA who got more money based on the letters behind their name. I know you have to have a master's for teaching or admin positions. But for a clinical job...? Really? Is it just a massive pissing contest?

Just had to rant a little.

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OK I haven't been on the forum for a while, so please be kind with your comments...

What is up with a doctor of nursing degree? I know a PA who got her doctorate too, and I don't get it. Go to medical school if you want to be called doctor! At least it's honest and not confusing.

I understand the concept of degree creep (where you have to have higher and higher degrees to do the same job that others have done for many years) but what is it for? I don't know any PA who got more money based on the letters behind their name. I know you have to have a master's for teaching or admin positions. But for a clinical job...? Really? Is it just a massive pissing contest?

Just had to rant a little.

 

The DNP degree was initially conceived as a way to legitimize NP independence, and more importantly, to make the case for full, and equal compensation for NPs practicing in primary care. It's sort of the gateway for the NPs to use to start to become the defacto primary care alternative to physicians. It's actually from a policy perspective, quite brilliant.

 

I have a doctorate but not for the clinical setting. For research purposes. I would argue that real doctors aren't MDs but PhDs, but I might be biased. :)

 

Finally, it's all a massive pissing contest...it always will be.

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OK I haven't been on the forum for a while, so please be kind with your comments...

What is up with a doctor of nursing degree? I know a PA who got her doctorate too, and I don't get it. Go to medical school if you want to be called doctor! At least it's honest and not confusing.

I understand the concept of degree creep (where you have to have higher and higher degrees to do the same job that others have done for many years) but what is it for? I don't know any PA who got more money based on the letters behind their name. I know you have to have a master's for teaching or admin positions. But for a clinical job...? Really? Is it just a massive pissing contest?

Just had to rant a little.

 

The DNP degree was initially conceived as a way to legitimize NP independence, and more importantly, to make the case for full, and equal compensation for NPs practicing in primary care. It's sort of the gateway for the NPs to use to start to become the defacto primary care alternative to physicians. It's actually from a policy perspective, quite brilliant.

 

I have a doctorate but not for the clinical setting. For research purposes. I would argue that real doctors aren't MDs but PhDs, but I might be biased. :)

 

Finally, it's all a massive pissing contest...it always will be.

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OK I haven't been on the forum for a while, so please be kind with your comments...

What is up with a doctor of nursing degree? I know a PA who got her doctorate too, and I don't get it. Go to medical school if you want to be called doctor! At least it's honest and not confusing.

I understand the concept of degree creep (where you have to have higher and higher degrees to do the same job that others have done for many years) but what is it for? I don't know any PA who got more money based on the letters behind their name. I know you have to have a master's for teaching or admin positions. But for a clinical job...? Really? Is it just a massive pissing contest?

Just had to rant a little.

 

The DNP degree was initially conceived as a way to legitimize NP independence, and more importantly, to make the case for full, and equal compensation for NPs practicing in primary care. It's sort of the gateway for the NPs to use to start to become the defacto primary care alternative to physicians. It's actually from a policy perspective, quite brilliant.

 

I have a doctorate but not for the clinical setting. For research purposes. I would argue that real doctors aren't MDs but PhDs, but I might be biased. :)

 

Finally, it's all a massive pissing contest...it always will be.

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I don't know any PA who got more money based on the letters behind their name. I know you have to have a master's for teaching or admin positions. But for a clinical job...? Really? Is it just a massive pissing contest?

 

Most people I know get higher degrees to study stuff they love not to punch tickets or make big money. Law and Medicine seem to be the big exceptions. My wife made zero more money at her current career by doing her biology research, but she loved it (and will probably continue once I am finished school) My father didn't make any more after getting his doctorate. Life is just about learning and discovery for some people.

 

I understand the concept of degree creep (where you have to have higher and higher degrees to do the same job that others have done for many years) but what is it for?

When PA-C's from these new schools they are opening flood the market, employers only will start looking to hire PAs with more credentials including PhDs. This is why all airforce pilots are officers with degrees now. Originally they had enlisted pilots, but lots of people wanted to be pilots and it's just another way to weed people out. It doesn't add to their flying abilities at all. Once they start pumping out docs left and right they will suffer the same fate (more training and specialization to separate themselves from the herd.) So perhaps those PAs you know with those extra letters are just reading the writing on the wall.

 

Go to medical school if you want to be called doctor! At least it's honest and not confusing.

 

It's neither confusing nor dishonest to pursue a PhD. The time and commitment required for a PhD is not comparable to getting an MD. It is not confusing to have a PhD in medical science or nursing any more than it would be if an engineering professor or biology PhD became a PA. It is idiotic to claim that it would be. Besides, when I was in the military I called my Medics, PAs, and MDs all "doc." At no point did this ever result in any issues or confusion. "OMG this university is full of doctors! Can I get my surgery here or not" is a scenario that is just as unlikely as the "OMG my nurse is a doctor what do I do" scenario.

 

Personally, I think that people who get off on titles usually have some significant self esteem issues. It's a case of "How will people know how important I am if my title isn't super special!" The same thing used to happen in the military with badges and awards.

 

<Disclaimer, I don't know much about anything and I am probably wrong about most of this post. Also, I'm not a PA or anything else. Really, I'm just bored... so take it all with a gain of salt.>

 

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I don't know any PA who got more money based on the letters behind their name. I know you have to have a master's for teaching or admin positions. But for a clinical job...? Really? Is it just a massive pissing contest?

 

Most people I know get higher degrees to study stuff they love not to punch tickets or make big money. Law and Medicine seem to be the big exceptions. My wife made zero more money at her current career by doing her biology research, but she loved it (and will probably continue once I am finished school) My father didn't make any more after getting his doctorate. Life is just about learning and discovery for some people.

 

I understand the concept of degree creep (where you have to have higher and higher degrees to do the same job that others have done for many years) but what is it for?

When PA-C's from these new schools they are opening flood the market, employers only will start looking to hire PAs with more credentials including PhDs. This is why all airforce pilots are officers with degrees now. Originally they had enlisted pilots, but lots of people wanted to be pilots and it's just another way to weed people out. It doesn't add to their flying abilities at all. Once they start pumping out docs left and right they will suffer the same fate (more training and specialization to separate themselves from the herd.) So perhaps those PAs you know with those extra letters are just reading the writing on the wall.

 

Go to medical school if you want to be called doctor! At least it's honest and not confusing.

 

It's neither confusing nor dishonest to pursue a PhD. The time and commitment required for a PhD is not comparable to getting an MD. It is not confusing to have a PhD in medical science or nursing any more than it would be if an engineering professor or biology PhD became a PA. It is idiotic to claim that it would be. Besides, when I was in the military I called my Medics, PAs, and MDs all "doc." At no point did this ever result in any issues or confusion. "OMG this university is full of doctors! Can I get my surgery here or not" is a scenario that is just as unlikely as the "OMG my nurse is a doctor what do I do" scenario.

 

Personally, I think that people who get off on titles usually have some significant self esteem issues. It's a case of "How will people know how important I am if my title isn't super special!" The same thing used to happen in the military with badges and awards.

 

<Disclaimer, I don't know much about anything and I am probably wrong about most of this post. Also, I'm not a PA or anything else. Really, I'm just bored... so take it all with a gain of salt.>

 

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I don't know any PA who got more money based on the letters behind their name. I know you have to have a master's for teaching or admin positions. But for a clinical job...? Really? Is it just a massive pissing contest?

 

Most people I know get higher degrees to study stuff they love not to punch tickets or make big money. Law and Medicine seem to be the big exceptions. My wife made zero more money at her current career by doing her biology research, but she loved it (and will probably continue once I am finished school) My father didn't make any more after getting his doctorate. Life is just about learning and discovery for some people.

 

I understand the concept of degree creep (where you have to have higher and higher degrees to do the same job that others have done for many years) but what is it for?

When PA-C's from these new schools they are opening flood the market, employers only will start looking to hire PAs with more credentials including PhDs. This is why all airforce pilots are officers with degrees now. Originally they had enlisted pilots, but lots of people wanted to be pilots and it's just another way to weed people out. It doesn't add to their flying abilities at all. Once they start pumping out docs left and right they will suffer the same fate (more training and specialization to separate themselves from the herd.) So perhaps those PAs you know with those extra letters are just reading the writing on the wall.

 

Go to medical school if you want to be called doctor! At least it's honest and not confusing.

 

It's neither confusing nor dishonest to pursue a PhD. The time and commitment required for a PhD is not comparable to getting an MD. It is not confusing to have a PhD in medical science or nursing any more than it would be if an engineering professor or biology PhD became a PA. It is idiotic to claim that it would be. Besides, when I was in the military I called my Medics, PAs, and MDs all "doc." At no point did this ever result in any issues or confusion. "OMG this university is full of doctors! Can I get my surgery here or not" is a scenario that is just as unlikely as the "OMG my nurse is a doctor what do I do" scenario.

 

Personally, I think that people who get off on titles usually have some significant self esteem issues. It's a case of "How will people know how important I am if my title isn't super special!" The same thing used to happen in the military with badges and awards.

 

<Disclaimer, I don't know much about anything and I am probably wrong about most of this post. Also, I'm not a PA or anything else. Really, I'm just bored... so take it all with a gain of salt.>

 

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Guest Paula
He requested a deletion of his acct...

 

Sent from my myTouch_4G_Slide using Tapatalk 2

 

Oh, I miss his lively discussions and opinions. Sorry he's gone from the forum.

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Guest Paula
He requested a deletion of his acct...

 

Sent from my myTouch_4G_Slide using Tapatalk 2

 

Oh, I miss his lively discussions and opinions. Sorry he's gone from the forum.

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Guest Paula
He requested a deletion of his acct...

 

Sent from my myTouch_4G_Slide using Tapatalk 2

 

Oh, I miss his lively discussions and opinions. Sorry he's gone from the forum.

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Most people I know get higher degrees to study stuff they love not to punch tickets or make big money. Law and Medicine seem to be the big exceptions. My wife made zero more money at her current career by doing her biology research, but she loved it (and will probably continue once I am finished school) My father didn't make any more after getting his doctorate. Life is just about learning and discovery for some people.

 

When PA-C's from these new schools they are opening flood the market, employers only will start looking to hire PAs with more credentials including PhDs. This is why all airforce pilots are officers with degrees now. Originally they had enlisted pilots, but lots of people wanted to be pilots and it's just another way to weed people out. It doesn't add to their flying abilities at all. Once they start pumping out docs left and right they will suffer the same fate (more training and specialization to separate themselves from the herd.) So perhaps those PAs you know with those extra letters are just reading the writing on the wall.

 

 

It's neither confusing nor dishonest to pursue a PhD. The time and commitment required for a PhD is not comparable to getting an MD. It is not confusing to have a PhD in medical science or nursing any more than it would be if an engineering professor or biology PhD became a PA. It is idiotic to claim that it would be. Besides, when I was in the military I called my Medics, PAs, and MDs all "doc." At no point did this ever result in any issues or confusion. "OMG this university is full of doctors! Can I get my surgery here or not" is a scenario that is just as unlikely as the "OMG my nurse is a doctor what do I do" scenario.

 

Personally, I think that people who get off on titles usually have some significant self esteem issues. It's a case of "How will people know how important I am if my title isn't super special!" The same thing used to happen in the military with badges and awards.

 

<Disclaimer, I don't know much about anything and I am probably wrong about most of this post. Also, I'm not a PA or anything else. Really, I'm just bored... so take it all with a gain of salt.>

 

I'm not saying it's dishonest to get a PhD and be called Dr. But the Doctorate of nursing seems a bit confusing when a patient sees a provider who has Dr as their title but did not go to medical school. I think I'm safe saying that they are NOT the same things. Nowhere did I say that getting an MD was comparable to getting a PhD... Sigh.

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Most people I know get higher degrees to study stuff they love not to punch tickets or make big money. Law and Medicine seem to be the big exceptions. My wife made zero more money at her current career by doing her biology research, but she loved it (and will probably continue once I am finished school) My father didn't make any more after getting his doctorate. Life is just about learning and discovery for some people.

 

When PA-C's from these new schools they are opening flood the market, employers only will start looking to hire PAs with more credentials including PhDs. This is why all airforce pilots are officers with degrees now. Originally they had enlisted pilots, but lots of people wanted to be pilots and it's just another way to weed people out. It doesn't add to their flying abilities at all. Once they start pumping out docs left and right they will suffer the same fate (more training and specialization to separate themselves from the herd.) So perhaps those PAs you know with those extra letters are just reading the writing on the wall.

 

 

It's neither confusing nor dishonest to pursue a PhD. The time and commitment required for a PhD is not comparable to getting an MD. It is not confusing to have a PhD in medical science or nursing any more than it would be if an engineering professor or biology PhD became a PA. It is idiotic to claim that it would be. Besides, when I was in the military I called my Medics, PAs, and MDs all "doc." At no point did this ever result in any issues or confusion. "OMG this university is full of doctors! Can I get my surgery here or not" is a scenario that is just as unlikely as the "OMG my nurse is a doctor what do I do" scenario.

 

Personally, I think that people who get off on titles usually have some significant self esteem issues. It's a case of "How will people know how important I am if my title isn't super special!" The same thing used to happen in the military with badges and awards.

 

<Disclaimer, I don't know much about anything and I am probably wrong about most of this post. Also, I'm not a PA or anything else. Really, I'm just bored... so take it all with a gain of salt.>

 

I'm not saying it's dishonest to get a PhD and be called Dr. But the Doctorate of nursing seems a bit confusing when a patient sees a provider who has Dr as their title but did not go to medical school. I think I'm safe saying that they are NOT the same things. Nowhere did I say that getting an MD was comparable to getting a PhD... Sigh.

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Most people I know get higher degrees to study stuff they love not to punch tickets or make big money. Law and Medicine seem to be the big exceptions. My wife made zero more money at her current career by doing her biology research, but she loved it (and will probably continue once I am finished school) My father didn't make any more after getting his doctorate. Life is just about learning and discovery for some people.

 

When PA-C's from these new schools they are opening flood the market, employers only will start looking to hire PAs with more credentials including PhDs. This is why all airforce pilots are officers with degrees now. Originally they had enlisted pilots, but lots of people wanted to be pilots and it's just another way to weed people out. It doesn't add to their flying abilities at all. Once they start pumping out docs left and right they will suffer the same fate (more training and specialization to separate themselves from the herd.) So perhaps those PAs you know with those extra letters are just reading the writing on the wall.

 

 

It's neither confusing nor dishonest to pursue a PhD. The time and commitment required for a PhD is not comparable to getting an MD. It is not confusing to have a PhD in medical science or nursing any more than it would be if an engineering professor or biology PhD became a PA. It is idiotic to claim that it would be. Besides, when I was in the military I called my Medics, PAs, and MDs all "doc." At no point did this ever result in any issues or confusion. "OMG this university is full of doctors! Can I get my surgery here or not" is a scenario that is just as unlikely as the "OMG my nurse is a doctor what do I do" scenario.

 

Personally, I think that people who get off on titles usually have some significant self esteem issues. It's a case of "How will people know how important I am if my title isn't super special!" The same thing used to happen in the military with badges and awards.

 

<Disclaimer, I don't know much about anything and I am probably wrong about most of this post. Also, I'm not a PA or anything else. Really, I'm just bored... so take it all with a gain of salt.>

 

I'm not saying it's dishonest to get a PhD and be called Dr. But the Doctorate of nursing seems a bit confusing when a patient sees a provider who has Dr as their title but did not go to medical school. I think I'm safe saying that they are NOT the same things. Nowhere did I say that getting an MD was comparable to getting a PhD... Sigh.

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