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What's the key to longevity in your career?


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Hey everyone, 

I've been a scribe in a local ED for almost 5 years now and I've had the wonderful opportunity to work with PA's, NP's, MD's, and DO's.  I work with incredibly supportive providers who answer all of my questions, whether it's about medicine or life.  I've always found it perplexing when I see providers who have been practicing for the same amount of time have different attitudes when they come into work.  Sometimes, you get a highly enthusiastic provider who is always hungry for more, and sometimes, you get a provider who is clearly burnt out and can't wait for their day to end.  If there's one thing I learned through working with everyone, it's that money does not buy you happiness.  Some providers have told me they mistakenly thought that becoming a doctor would make them happy, and this is the farthest thing from the trust.  I'm going to be starting a PA program in January, I love medicine, and I could not be more excited.  So I ask the common question: what do you think is the secret to longevity in your career?  

 

Some varying answers I've gotten include having a meaningful life outside of work, but the one that resonated with me the most was having a continued appreciation for what you do.  Just curious what your thoughts are, especially those of you who have been in the field for quite some time.

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The previous two posts have it nailed.  Find a situation and group of people that fits you.  Don't settle on this one thing.  Period.   Money and other stuff is nice, but if you hate your job or yourself or the people you work with (!!), you will regret it.  

I just learned this the hard way.  Wasn't my fault, the whole thing was a carefully constructed lie/show (bait and switch) and I found out on the first day, but I should have handed the badge back day 1 and said "not even remotely what I applied for, good luck with that". 

Commute, money, prestige, type of work...all secondary to fitting in and liking your work.  100%.  I'd commute an hour and valet patients' %$#@ cars for half the money of the big, sexy shiny organization right down the block with the killer hours/call and/or condescending or otherwise unpleasant or toxic work environment.  

Taxes eat a lot of the increase anyway.  Sorry for the rant all about me, but it's kind of what I do.  

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find a position doing something you enjoy where you are treated well. I look forward to going to work now. this wasn't always the case. For me it's about appropriate autonomy, scope of practice, and respect. money should not be the motivating factor. there are places I could make more, but I would be treated like crap and dread going to work. it's just not worth it.

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This is slightly off topic, UGoLong, but I tried to send you a private message and wasn't able to. How did you come to being a PA at a relatively later age? I'm thinking about a career switch myself but have so many questions. If you posted about this elsewhere please post a link. Would love to hear from anyone "older" (I'm 42) who were relatively "late to the game" or who had an untraditional path to being a PA. 

Cheers!

Duckie 

 

 

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This is slightly off topic, UGoLong, but I tried to send you a private message and wasn't able to. How did you come to being a PA at a relatively later age? I'm thinking about a career switch myself but have so many questions. If you posted about this elsewhere please post a link. Would love to hear from anyone "older" (I'm 42) who were relatively "late to the game" or who had an untraditional path to being a PA. 
Cheers!
Duckie 
 
 
Duckie,

I sent you a message over the forum. Let me know if you don't get it.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

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On 9/3/2017 at 5:28 PM, myironlung said:

Money is my motivating factor and has kept me happy for the past 7 years. Let's stop with the condescending tone of the money factor. To each their own. 

You've found a situation that fits you based on your priorities.  Money is only one overriding or "blinding" factor that can come into play.  Another example is taking a job (or medical school) someone else pressured you into, like a spouse or a parent.  An equally bad idea.

Find what you are comfortable with...and do that.

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I have had jobs that paid a lot and I hated going to work. I have had jobs that paid poorly that I loved. Now I have a job that pays me well and the work isn't that hard and I like to people I work with.

It is about that "pluses" and "minuses" list and what is important to you. I have never had the perfect job but I try to keep myself in the plus column. If you hate going to work money will only sustain you for so long.

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