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Hello. As of today I have only applied to one PA school program (Rutgers) but unfortunately I got denied. I decided not to apply to any other schools this cycle as I have not started my senior year yet and am missing some of the prerequisite courses for many programs. I am currently working as a Medical Scribe and have been doing this for about one year now with about 750 hours. I also volunteered at a food pantry but only completed about 50 hours doing so. My science GPA is 3.32 and my cumulative GPA of 3.62.  I am planning to complete my senior year and continue working to build up more hours and reapply next cycle with a stronger application but I am worried that my experience as a scribe may not be enough. Do you think I should search for something else to do other than scribing to expand my resume?  I won’t have much time to do so during the school year as I will be busy with school work and working about twice a week so I might have to quit my current job if I do so. I am scribing a PA in family medicine and am scared to leave as I feel this is a very good experience and what I want to do in the future. 

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5 minutes ago, Perdikos said:

Hello. As of today I have only applied to one PA school program (Rutgers) but unfortunately I got denied. I decided not to apply to any other schools this cycle as I have not started my senior year yet and am missing some of the prerequisite courses for many programs. I am currently working as a Medical Scribe and have been doing this for about one year now with about 750 hours. I also volunteered at a food pantry but only completed about 50 hours doing so. My science GPA is 3.32 and my cumulative GPA of 3.62.  I am planning to complete my senior year and continue working to build up more hours and reapply next cycle with a stronger application but I am worried that my experience as a scribe may not be enough. Do you think I should search for something else to do other than scribing to expand my resume?  I won’t have much time to do so during the school year as I will be busy with school work and working about twice a week so I might have to quit my current job if I do so. I am scribing a PA in family medicine and am scared to leave as I feel this is a very good experience and what I want to do in the future. 

Hey! Start getting an idea of schools that you would like to apply to in the future. Some schools will accept scribe as PCE and some do not. Also, some rank PCE and scribing may have less weight. Yet some schools all PCE is the same weight. I would first look into schools, if scribing works for them then I wouldnt sweat it too much especially if the job works for you. Most schools have the info on their website or will usually answer a simple email if you ask.

Now if you want some schools where scribing doesn't work out then maybe switch....or just find the schools that take scribing outright and focus on them!

Edited by Kirby219
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11 minutes ago, Perdikos said:

Thanks for the reply but is it okay to only have one form of experience or do schools favor those who have a diverse resume?

From what I see on here most people have one main area of PCE whether its CNA, MA, Scribe, etc. I would assume that schools would prefer to have a diverse background but sometimes changing jobs isn't always the easiest.

Now some people will have more diversity but generally those people have been out of college for some time which sometimes causes or allows for changes in PCE experience.

To get more a more diverse then some will change up whatever kind of volenteering you do which would allow schools to see you have a diverse background when it comes to populations you interact with.

Overall, having scribe and some other experience would most certainly help i feel. Even if you change scribing locations from family practice to emergency or something.

Just my 2 cents on the matter! But I don't think a job change would be specifically necessary.

Edited by Kirby219
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