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Hi guys, 

I am currently an undergrad about to graduate in May with a bachelor of science in Neuroscience. I'm hoping to get some advice/insight on my application and stats. 

cGPA: 3.4

sGPA: 3.2

Last 60 hrs: 3.7

PCE: 

  • ER scribe: 2000+ (I understand not all school accepts this as PCE but the schools I will be applying to does) 
  • MA?: 700 hrs. (I worked at a Chiropractor office about 2 years ago. I didn't have a job title but my duties included triage, assisting physician in minor procedures, and acting as a medical translator between the patient and the physician)
    • Would this still count? 
  • Medical Assistance: About to begin this job in May at a local urgent care near my house. Will be train on the spot and hopefully get certified in a few months.

Volunteer: 

  • Children Hospital: 60+ hours
  • Volunteer at local hospital in high school: 50 hours (Don't know if this would still count)

Shadowing:

  • 30+ hours ER PA (2 separate PA)
  • 10 hours cardiology PA
  • pending shadowing with ICU PA 

LOR:

  • ER physician 
  • ER Physician
  • ER PA
  • Cardiology PA

GRE: taking in May 

So, I understand both of my GPA is on the lower side. I did dual enrollment as a high school student and my transfer GPA after starting college was 3.8. Sadly, something very unfortunate happened in my life a week before my first semester and it became really tough balancing school, my life, and my mother's medical issue. I was also a Biology major and very confused about what I wanted to do in my life during this time. Took a bunch of classes I never needed (wasted money) and made B's on most of them and 1 C. Then, the following year my mother's health worsened and stupidly during this time I decided to take O-chem while all of this was happening.  I ended up failing my first class ever with a D. It took a while for me to bounce back but I eventually did and passed O-chem the second time I retook it. Since then, I've changed my major to Neuroscience (LOVE IT) and have made A's in most of my classes and 2-3 B's in others. 

Is there anyway to improve my application? I am planning to apply this cycle regardless just to get familiar with the process and hopefully I get an offer or two. However, I am prepare to accept the fact that I may not get in this year so that means I might have a "gap" year to improve myself. I would appreciate any advice/insight! Thank you for taking your time to read this!

Edited by ttnPA

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I'm not trying to be super obnoxious by linking to my own post, but I wrote everything there that I'd say to you now. It sounds like you have reasonable expectations about this cycle. I'd think about taking one or two science classes/semester to raise your GPAs. Good luck!

 

 

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Double check with the schools that you are apply to that they do not require a letter of rec from an academic person. Some programs don't require one, but I believe the majority do. If you're worried about your stats, apply to holistic programs as they won't focus on the academic portion of your application.

Make sure your personal statement is about WHY YOU and WHY PA. Don't list the duties of a PA or the duties of a position you held. Show, don't tell. Be concise! Make sure you have stellar letter of recs as well. Best of luck!

Edited by aba51
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