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Registration Now Open for SEMPA 360!

Make a difference in your practice by joining us for SEMPA 360, March 16-20, 2020, in Chicago, IL for the most in-depth and comprehensive educational experience available for EMPAs.

Register Now To:

  • Increase your depth and breadth of medical knowledge
  • Take your emergency medicine skills to the next level with hands-on workshops
  • Learn about the specialty’s latest tools, trends and techniques
  • Connect with colleagues from across the country
  • Build a network of likeminded people
  • And much, much more!

 

And if you register today, you can take advantage of

the deeply discounted early-bird rates!

https://www.sempa.org/sempa360/

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      Was hoping to get some opinions on an offer before I accept, this is my first contract as a new grad!
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      Full time hourly at $40.95/hr (+$5/hr night differential). 36 hours/week at 12-hour shifts rotating between observation, fast track and main ED. 5 hours/week didactic education. Opportunities to pick up additional shifts at 1.5x base. (Based on scheduling preferences/OT, anywhere between 88-100K/year)
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      Hi everyone, I received my first offer today after applying for what feels like a million jobs. The position is in emergency medicine. It's a hospital I worked in prior to PA school. They are offering me the following: 
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    • By surgblumm
      Future Standards for PAs and NPs

      Bob Blumm, PA, DFAAPA, PA-C Emeritus

               Standards: it seems as if everyone is talking about them today. We are either creating standards, improving standards, setting new standards or raising standards. Ultimately, as decades pass, standards grow, and this seems appropriate considering the health care needs in the United States and our world standing in that sphere. Like most Americans, I had always assumed that we were naturally - Number One - but was disheartened to discover that my assumptions were grounded in my patriotism and not in evidence-based studies. Depending upon the source and the year, the US typically ranks in the top 20 or 30% and shockingly behind all other nation members of the G-10 (including many smaller countries). This surprising revelation gave me pause to reflect on our “standard of care.”

      What does the word “standard” connote to the average PA, NP, or patient in terms of academic achievement? It might be interpreted as an entry-level bachelor’s or master’s degree - or perhaps even a doctoral degree. Many of these advanced levels could never have been imagined in the past but are now very much a part of the 2021 working world for PAs and NPs. How quickly times change with more and more clinicians earning doctorate degrees – spurring insurance companies and administrators to establish yet even newer benchmarks based on this academic proliferation.  If we as a profession do not set our own standards, someone else or another profession will surely try to do it for us. If ever we needed cohesive leadership, it is now! Maybe you are the person who can lead us into the future?

      What do I personally think of standards? I believe that standards are a very positive modifier of our practice protocols and approaches to medicine. I see the patient as the ultimate winner when a profession has high standards. Standards lead to increased study and competence. Standards are set and maintained by academia, education secured at conferences, and CME provided by associations. They are enhanced by experience and certified by procedural attestation such as those through residency rotations. There will, in the near future, be a mandated procedural attestation required within all institutions of medical care. When looking at medical specialties, we note that either a residency or a specialized track of education and experience defines what an institution requires for an NP or a PA to be hired.

      Most of the specialty areas need highly experienced, highly motivated, and extremely well-educated PAs and NPs and are willing to provide a mini residency. Some of these specialties require additional education, CME, preceptorship, and a specialized curriculum in addition to an advanced degree. I will repeat a sentence that I wrote ten years ago: “The time is quickly coming upon us that will no longer place on a resume ‘PA seeking a hospitalist role, ---- willing to learn, seeking physician willing to teach.’” That time became a reality more than five years ago. Physicians are engaged in their own fight for survival, focused on issues which affect their profession, leaving little time for the altruism of the past when they sought to be the “teacher” to a nonphysician. The economy, new health care laws, insurance mandated reimbursements, malpractice issues, and the huge financial debt incurred while becoming doctors have caused them to protect their own turf and areas of responsibility.

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