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  1. Was hoping to get some opinions on an offer before I accept, this is my first contract as a new grad! Position is a fellowship located in New York, level III trauma center seeing 70K patients a year. First 12 months a physician will always also see your patients, with review to determine if you can begin seeing level 4/5 independently for the last 6 months. Not the greatest area but that means a very diverse patient population. There is NO residency program, so the PA fellows have first dibs at procedures and other opportunities if they want to learn them. Lead PA has been there 10+ years which tells me something, and says PAs get a very high level of autonomy in this ED with great physician support. 18 month contract (can sever with 120 days' notice) Full time hourly at $40.95/hr (+$5/hr night differential). 36 hours/week at 12-hour shifts rotating between observation, fast track and main ED. 5 hours/week didactic education. Opportunities to pick up additional shifts at 1.5x base. (Based on scheduling preferences/OT, anywhere between 88-100K/year) Full medical/dental/vision/disability benefits (Was told you don't get benefits summary until after you sign, is this standard? I find this strange and need to clarify) 401K match (need to obtain details) Malpractice + tail Full reimbursement for license/DEA $1,500 CME allowance/year NO PTO except as required by state law (was told they work with your requests and are able to schedule you early one week/late next to gain 7-8 days off for vacation though) 5K completion bonus at end of term, additional 5K retention bonus if you accept a position there at the end of the fellowship ACLS, ATLS, PALS, emergency ultrasound and emergency airway training provided Seems like a great opportunity as a fellowship to get my foot in the door of EM (have spent 5 months applying for EM positions in various states across the country with no bites, and I've been an EMT 8 years). Thanks in advance!
  2. Hi everyone, I received my first offer today after applying for what feels like a million jobs. The position is in emergency medicine. It's a hospital I worked in prior to PA school. They are offering me the following: $60/hour with a guarantee of 120 hours per month (equals out to $86,400 annually) 120 hours PTO annually and 40 hours long term sick annually. Malpractice and tail insurance as well as CME credits through the company's online learning institute. Benefits: medical, eye, dental and 401K with up to 3% match after a year of employment No reimbursement for licensing, DEA, or CME allowance as they provide CME credits through their online learning institute. I'm satisfied with the hourly rate, it's pretty on par with what I see in the AAPA salary report for NY new grads, but my question is - is this a good offer? The annual salary is quite low compared to the salary report for EM positions, but I believe that's due to the low number of monthly hours. I've asked for a signon bonus and I've asked to be guaranteed 140 hours per month as that raises my salary considerably, but I'm looking for opinions as I'm new at this and want to make sure I don't take the first offer I get just out of excitement to be offered a job. Thanks in advance!!
  3. Did anyone study some type of resource in advance for their ER rotation during clinical year? If so, what book/resource did you use? I have it as my first rotation and I am extremely interested in doing ER in the future so I definitely want to impress. Any tips would be great!
  4. Join us as Anand "Swami" Swaminathan, MD reviews what works (and what doesn't work) against COVID-19. Feb 18, 2021; 3:00 pm CST https://www.sempa.org/education/sempa-live/
  5. Hi all. Our EM practice is in the works of developing a head PA/NP position (manager in a sense). Currently we have a liaison who is a physician-but the physician wants to turn it over to the APPs. Since this is a new trial process for our group, I wanted to reach out and see what the job description and stipend/benefits your group gives to the PA/NP who is essentially "in charge" of the APPs at your practice. If you could tell me the type of practice you work in, location (state), job description for head APP (rough expectations), and stipend/benefits for that position I would greatly appreciate it.
  6. The University of California San Francisco (UCSF) - Fresno Emergency Medicine PA Residency is accepting applications for the 2021 application cycle. This 18-month postgraduate program, affiliated with the UCSF School of Medicine, is designed to prepare PAs to practice in a variety of emergency medicine environments. We will be accepting 2 residents in 2021. Virtual interviews will be offered in 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The class will start late June 2021 but we will be offering rolling admissions into the Fall for accepted applicants who have a later PA school graduation date. Deadline to apply is January 15, 2021. Rotations include: Trauma Critical Care Pediatric Emergency Medicine Burn Orthopedics Dermatology Ophthalmology Oral Maxillofacial Surgery Toxicology Emergency Ultrasound Anesthesia EMS  Resuscitation courses include: ACLS, ATLS, BLS, PALS 18-month stipend: $87,000 Benefits include medical, dental, vision, life insurance, disability insurance, 401k, employee assistance program, 4 weeks of vacation, membership in the Society of Emergency Medicine Physician Assistants (SEMPA), UCSF email access, textbook, malpractice coverage, and more. Paid travel to SEMPA 360, SEMPA's annual conference. Our state-of-the-art ED at Community Regional Medical Center serves as the only Level 1 Trauma Center/Burn Center for Central California, and handles an annual ED volume of over 110,000. The Department of Emergency Medicine hosts fellowships in Emergency Ultrasound, Medical Education, and Wilderness Medicine. Our faculty are involved with EM:RAP, EMS, wilderness medicine, ultrasound, medical education, toxicology, international emergency medicine, and more. They are also leaders within the emergency medicine and EMPA community. PA Resident safety is our highest priority during the COVID-19 pandemic. PPE is in supply and rotations are constantly evaluated to ensure a safe work environment. What's it like to train here? https://youtu.be/3r0p-WhytpY https://youtu.be/0I81VgBvU4E Website: http://www.fresno.ucsf.edu/emergency-medicine-physician-assistant/ Email: em.pa.residency@fresno.ucsf.edu
  7. SEMPA is launching its new SEMPA Live! virtual education channel by kicking it off with FREE CME courses. SEMPA Live! is a must-attend event for anyone who works in emergency medicine. From EMPAs to health care providers engaged in the practice of emergency medicine, SEMPA Live! lectures provide essential clinical content and vital risk-management concepts for a wide range of specialists. Once a month through the end of the year, SEMPA Live! will be offering a free CME lecture for EMPAs with a live question and answer session. There will also be an opportunity to virtually chat with other EMPAs from across the country. To register, go to https://www.sempa.org/education/sempa-live/. Upcoming SEMPA Live! Events August 25, 2020 7pm Central Doom From Down Under: Scary GYN Stories and What I Learned From Them + Q&A Jenny Beck-Esmay, MD September 22, 2020 7 pm Central Pitfalls to Avoid the Management of DKA + Q&A George Willis, MD October 13, 2020 7 pm Central Cardiology Literature Review: What's New in 2020 + Q&A Tarlan Hedayati, MD November 19, 2020 7 pm Central *Registration opening soon* "Pain in the...": A review of recent literature on managing common painful complaints in the ED + Q&A Jessica Mason, MD & Jessie Werner, MD December 9, 2020 7 pm Central Pediatric Orthopedic Pearls and Pitfalls + Q&A Andrew Perron, MD
  8. Hi All, I was wondering if there are any places taking students for rotations starting in Jan 2021? I would love a rotation in San Diego sometime between January and April as my husband is mobilized there with the NH Army National Guard. Other areas of geographical interest are the Midwest, New England, Alaska and Hawaii for Jan 2021-Dec 2021. Specifically rotations located in the following places: Western SD, Cheyenne, WY, Casper, WY, Western Nebraska, Denver, CO area inc. the foothills, Sioux City, IA, Topeka, KS, Indianapolis, IN, Palmer, AK, Hawaii, Minnesota, NH, VT, ME, and/or MA Thank you in advance!!
  9. EM PA here, our group is looking to moving towards single doc/PA coverage overnight, whereas we previously ended shifts around 1am. For all those who work shift work/overnights, wondering if you receive an overnight differential pay bump. If so, what is it? If you're more comfortable contacting me directly would be GREAT help. Attempting to get some data together to show higher ups its common for overnight diff in EM world. Also please include what state you work in and what specialty. Thank you in advance!!!!
  10. In this day of selivering bad news, I thought that this article that I saved from last year would be a great refresher. Food is food regardless of the source. The Rules for Delivering Bad News to Patients August 27, 2019 The Watercooler: Career Advice The Bookbag: Education The Rounds: Clinical Considerations General 0 Comments I've talked to some colleagues recently who've been a little down about their roles as nurse practitioners. Working in family practice, they have found themselves in the position of delivering bad or upsetting news to their patients. Cancer diagnoses were fortunately made rather than missed, but letting a patient know they've got a serious, life-altering illness or condition is tough, not to mention, this is not something most of us as NPs learn to do in school. Have you ever found yourself in the position of delivering difficult news to patients? How did you feel? Having such conversations as nurse practitioners can make us anxious or awkward. Some of us approach these discussions emotionally while others appear detached and robotic in their delivery of the news. Delivering bad news is an unavoidable part of our jobs as nurse practitioners but that doesn't mean we get used to it. Fortunately, however, conducting serious conversations is a skill that can be learned and there are many guidelines out there to help healthcare providers hone this skill set. Rule #1: Know what constitutes bad news Sometimes I share information with a patient that I perceive as not a big deal. Then, the patient starts to freak out. Or cry. Or to have some other sort of emotional reaction that I didn't anticipate. Bad news doesn't have to be a terminal diagnosis. It can be related to anything surrounding a diagnosis such as timing, personal or professional consequences. Breaking a metatarsal and wearing a boot, for example, may not be too bad in the grand scheme of things, but breaking your foot the day before your wedding is pretty disappointing. Rule #2: Full disclosure is best In the past, healthcare providers operated on a more guarded front. In the 1800's, for example, the American Medical Association even encouraged physicians to avoid sharing news that discouraged patients. Today, however, studies (not to mention ethics!) show that most patients prefer full disclosure. It's our duty as nurse practitioners to share up-front, honest information rather than sugar coat our delivery with excessive optimism, withhold details, or give false hope. Share news with the patient directly rather than directing it toward family members. Honest, trustworthy information is empowering! Rule #3: Prepare yourself Anticipate the conversation you're about to have with your patient. You may even wish to practice your delivery with a colleague. Prepare yourself to feely badly as you share the news. And, don't forget that silence is OK. Avoid the temptation to fill gaps in your conversation rather let the patient process and take the time to formulate questions. Rule #4: Frame the conversation Framing the news you're about to share is essential. Your patient may or may not be expecting to hear something difficult. And, the way you set up your conversation has an impact on the patient's reaction. Using the word "serious" (ex. "I have some serious news to share...") is better than using the word "bad". "Serious" creates a more constructive framework that inspires action and empowerment as opposed to the word "bad" which indicates the situation is helpless. Even if you're delivering a terminal diagnosis, your patient can choose how to react and what steps they wish to take in response. Rule #5: Think SPIKES There are a few well-known methods for delivering serious news to patients, my favorite of which is the SPIKES method. This algorithm lays out considerations for nurse practitioners and other healthcare providers in these situations. Here's the SPIKES protocol: Setup - Think through the conversation you're about to have, anticipating questions the patient might ask beforehand. Prepare for an emotional reaction. Gather any necessary resources that might be helpful for the patient. Perception - Gauge the patient's understanding and perspective on the news you have shared. This is best accomplished by asking questions like "What did you take away from what I just shared with you?" or "What are your expectations of treatment?". This way you know you are both on the same page as far as understanding the medical outlook, next steps and goals. Invitation - Encourage the patient to think further about their care going forward. Find out how much information the patient wants about his or her medical condition as well as who he/she would like to be included in decision making such as family members. Knowledge - This step has to do with how you as a provider deliver information. The best practice is to deliver the headline first, followed by the details. Communicate using language that matches the patient's level of education and medical knowledge. Be direct in your delivery, avoid skirting the main message. Empathy - Understandably, patients get emotional about serious news. Anticipate such a reaction and display empathy. Naming the patient's emotions can help. Asking "Can you tell me more about what you mean by that?" will also help you determine how the patient feels about the situation. Summarize and Strategize - Make a plan for the next steps in both treatment and communication with your patient. Express support and encourage the patient to tell friends and family the news to develop a personal support system. Talk about how the patient can act on this news to accomplish his or her treatment and lifestyle goals going forward. Have you ever delivered bad news to a patient? How did it go?
  11. Hi All, I am currently a PA who is in a fellowship for epidemiology which is about to end and I am trying to move back closer to Nevada where my family lives (we have a baby boy, now, and really want him to have grandparents around). I was wondering if anyone who lives in Las Vegas/Reno or SLC can share their thoughts on the job market, practice environment, and salaries in NV vs. UT? I have a strong background in public health and epidemiology/research, but I am thinking I might switch back to medicine for a while for the pay (my parents don't have enough money saved for retirement) and to keep my clinical skills fresh. I am interested in emergency medicine or any positions that might be well suited for someone with 2 years of Emed experience. Thanks for your consideration!
  12. Guess who's coming to SEMPA 360 in Chicago this year? The EM:RAP team will be returning for a day of fantastic education. There will also be time to meet some of your favorite hosts after the didactic session. Jess Mason, MD Danielle Campagne, MD Sean Nordt, MD Sanjay and Mike from Emergency Medical Abstracts Don't miss the EMPA event of the year! https://www.sempa.org/sempa360/
  13. Well, I've decided for certain that I am going to do an EM residency. My fiance and I have discussed this at length and he's fully in support, but with a caveat that he needs to be making more money to make up for my temporarily lost income first. Also, we are getting married in September of this year so we need to get that done first! He's an airline pilot and will be experiencing very sizable raises as he gains seniority in the upcoming months/years so I'm not worried that he won't be able to make up for my income, and I suspect that I would be able to start sometime around summer/fall of 2020 or maybe early 2021. That said, I'd like to make my application as competitive as possible. I have the impression that there is less competition for most residences than there is for PA school, but I am sure that will continue to change with time. I would hate to be building up to this plan and find myself behind the curve. I'm looking for input from anyone who has done any residency, and specifically EM of course. I work as a hospitalist currently, trying to pick up some UC or family medicine per diem work. What can I do to bolster an application? I am hoping to hit up the SEMPA EM bootcamp this summer and also plan to attend their conference next year. I don't know the likelihood that I'll be able to find EM work as someone who works full time in another specialty and has no EM experience outside of rotations in school, but if I have an opportunity I'll take it. Otherwise, just looking for ideas...
  14. Registration Now Open for SEMPA 360! Make a difference in your practice by joining us for SEMPA 360, March 16-20, 2020, in Chicago, IL for the most in-depth and comprehensive educational experience available for EMPAs. Register Now To: Increase your depth and breadth of medical knowledge Take your emergency medicine skills to the next level with hands-on workshops Learn about the specialty’s latest tools, trends and techniques Connect with colleagues from across the country Build a network of likeminded people And much, much more! And if you register today, you can take advantage of the deeply discounted early-bird rates! https://www.sempa.org/sempa360/
  15. Hey folks, I've been working in emergency medicine for about 1 year in a setting with a good mixture of high acuity and fastrack patients at a teaching institution. I've also worked during this time per diem at a low volume urgent care. While this has been an outstanding first job in terms of resume building and learning, it of course has the downside of wild hours, nights, weekends, holidays, etc. at a rather noncompetitive hourly rate/salary. I don't hate the job, but I also don't see myself doing emergency medicine forever. Or at least...not at this salary. For those who started in emergency medicine, what are your thoughts on transitioning to an urgent care job? I have heard some describe a miserable existence of patient volumes upwards of 60 patients a day, but I am guessing this is very dependent on the institution. Are there other specialties that make for a natural transition from emergency medicine? Am keeping all my options open at this point. Thanks!
  16. SEMPA is excited to roll out its new Mentoring Program specifically created for PAs new to emergency medicine; PA students interested in launching their career; or any seasoned emergency medicine PAs looking to advance and expand their profession and practice. How it works is that you fill out the online application and we match you with an experienced PA who can help guide your career. SEMPA mentors have years of experience in all types of ED settings and they have a wide variety of specialty interests. We will do our utmost best to match you with someone based on your profile and/or the specifics you give us so that you can get the most out of your mentoring experience. A SEMPA mentor can help with: Finding a job, preparing for a job interview and navigating contracts Understanding what emergency medicine educational resources are available What you can expect from the specialty Tips and tricks in making it through your shifts Guidance on moving up in emergency medicine Leadership development for new EMPA leaders And much more! Any SEMPA member is eligible to apply for a mentor through the SEMPA Mentoring Program. All you need is a desire to advance your career with the assistance of a mentor. Learn more and apply today! Get started here.
  17. 2019 SEMPA Emergency Procedures Course Oct 7-8, 2019 Jacksonville, Florida - 10.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits - All procedures performed on high fidelity simulators Airway management (direct laryngoscopy, video laryngoscopy, rescue devices) Lumbar puncture (with and without ultrasound guidance) Arthrocentesis (with and without ultrasound guidance) Intraosseous vascular access Central venous access (internal jugular, subclavian, femoral; with and without ultrasound guidance) Tube thoracostomy Needle decompression Paracentesis (with and without ultrasound guidance) Thoracentesis (with and without ultrasound guidance) Peritonsillar abscess drainage Arterial line placement - Procedural anatomy demonstration on human cadavers (limited hands-on) This course is expected to fill quickly so sign up now as registration is limited! https://sempa.org/education/procedures/
  18. SEMPA Ultrasound Courses November 8-10, 2019 Huntington Beach, CA https://www.sempa.org/education/ultrasound-huntingtonbeach/ January 27-28, 2020 Jacksonville, FL https://www.sempa.org/education/ultrasound-jacksonville/ The SEMPA Ultrasound Courses will provide point-of-care ultrasound training to physician assistants working in emergency medicine. Didactic sessions will focus on concise, useful information, images, and video. Most importantly, participants will have the opportunity to learn the necessary skills through hands-on teaching and practice on live models under the guidance of experienced faculty. Due to the popularity of this course, we will be offering two courses this winter. Choose the course that works best for you and register today!
  19. Hello Fellow EM colleagues, I am a new graduate who will be starting in the emergency department this month. I am extremely excited to return to the ED after having worked in the ED as a technician for 6 years. I am looking for any recommendations on studying material, reference books, bootcamps etc anything that will help begin my career in EM. Thank you so much for any feedback!!! -New Grad
  20. Registration now open for SEMPA 360 being held April 14-18, 2019 in New Orleans, Louisiana! Come learn from the best educators in emergency medicine. Conference favorites include Kevin Klauer, Amy Keim, Haney Mallemat, Michael Winters, and Richard Cantor to name a few. The EM:RAP team will also be joining us again in New Orleans for a day of learning along with a special meet-and-greet to visit with some of your favorite EM:RAP stars! Over twenty workshops will give you the skills needed in emergency procedures, airway management, ultrasound, slit lamp, suturing, x-ray interpretation, teaching, ECG interpretation, and more! Over 40 lecture sessions will cover topics such as critical care, trauma, pediatric emergency medicine, ophthalmology, cardiovascular emergencies, GI disorders, infectious disease, literature updates, and high risk emergency medicine. There are also plenty of social activities to enjoy with old and new friends. A wine and cheese reception, opening party at Mardi Gras World, and the SEMPA Quiz Bowl competition will welcome you to the EMPA event of the year. CME is available for PAs, physicians, and NPs. The discount for early bird registration ends Feb 13. The hotel room block is also limited so sign up now! For more information: https://www.sempa.org/sempa360
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