Jump to content

PA School


Recommended Posts

Hello, I am new to this website, after reading tons of forums and such I've decided to join the website.

My situation is I am planning on attending PA school after I graduate with my BS in Health Studies, minor in Chemistry. I am a sophomore, but junior credit-wise. As of now, I go to another school as well. In the beginning when I started college I sustained a horrific neck injury in which required surgery, and months of recovery during the semester, missed plenty of weeks and couldn't focus. As a freshmen, I finished with a 1.996 GPA, not great at all, and definitely not what I am capable of. I am in my 2nd year in the fall semester, two weeks away from the semester ending. As of now, I got all A's in classes such as, Human A&P, statistics and such. By the end of my bachelor's, the highest I can achieve I believe would be a 3.1 with the calculations I've done so far. I go to a community college as well to retake the classes I did poorly in such as Gen.Bio. 

Now WHEN I finish with approximately a 3.1 GPA with my bachelors, and get all A's in the classes I'm retaking in another school as well as the pre-requistes, How much would PA schools look into that, by that I mean my first year being horrible with such a low GPA. I suspect that I will receive an A/A- in every pre-req required now that I am fully 100%. I know most programs are minimum at 3.0 GPA, and I also know many get lucky and get into it with a low 3.0.

I know I have to get clinical hands-on experience which I have as a patient care tech, as well as shadows I'm always looking hard for. I'm projecting approximately 1200 hours by the end when I have to start applying to PA school.

 

I am starting to get worried because, I know how much potential I have and the hard-work I've put in so far after my personal injury. 

Any tips on what I should improve on? Any things I should change or redo? Please let me know! 

 

Thank You!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know that 'many' get in with low/near 3.0 GPAs.  It can be done but isn't common.  And those that do typically have YEARS of PCE to compensate, not only 1200 hrs of patient care tech experience.

If I were you I'd plan on working for a few years, ideally in something with more substantial patient care experience, while continuing to take upper level science courses to raise your GPA further before considering applying.

 

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I have a low overall GPA, around 3.1 and have been accepted during this application cycle. I think an upward trend in your grades is the best argument against having a low GPA. It certainly helped me as the first year I was rejected without interviews at all 13 schools I applied to. Although I have several years of PCE to help boost as well. Some schools I applied to said my first year's PCE was not as competitive (3500hrs) which was the main reason  they did not interview me. (This was one of the toughest PA programs to get into though... so definitely not true for all programs) So I would say that if you have an upward trend in grades, then try to accumulate as many hours as you can. If you can afford to fill out the applications (since CASPA costs a good chunk) I would say don't talk yourself out of it.

  • Upvote 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Chewbacca12 said:

I have a low overall GPA, around 3.1 and have been accepted during this application cycle. I think an upward trend in your grades is the best argument against having a low GPA. It certainly helped me as the first year I was rejected without interviews at all 13 schools I applied to. Although I have several years of PCE to help boost as well. Some schools I applied to said my first year's PCE was not as competitive (3500hrs) which was the main reason  they did not interview me. (This was one of the toughest PA programs to get into though... so definitely not true for all programs) So I would say that if you have an upward trend in grades, then try to accumulate as many hours as you can. If you can afford to fill out the applications (since CASPA costs a good chunk) I would say don't talk yourself out of it.

 

3 hours ago, Chewbacca12 said:

I have a low overall GPA, around 3.1 and have been accepted during this application cycle. I think an upward trend in your grades is the best argument against having a low GPA. It certainly helped me as the first year I was rejected without interviews at all 13 schools I applied to. Although I have several years of PCE to help boost as well. Some schools I applied to said my first year's PCE was not as competitive (3500hrs) which was the main reason  they did not interview me. (This was one of the toughest PA programs to get into though... so definitely not true for all programs) So I would say that if you have an upward trend in grades, then try to accumulate as many hours as you can. If you can afford to fill out the applications (since CASPA costs a good chunk) I would say don't talk yourself out of it.

Indeed, my grades so far since the year started have not had below an B+ (physics), everything else in the A’s. That’s what I was thinking maybe they’ll look at my progression and letters of recommendation and take a close look. Either way I’ll either do a Post-Bacc, get my hours up, and see how it goes from there to increase my GPA. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More