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Did anyone get admitted with prereqs from community college?


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I'm working full-time right now with a degree in computer engineering, and so I have very few of my prereqs thus far. As long as I continue working, I'm pretty much limited to just classes from community college since only my nights and weekends are open now. I know the Baylor website says they will accept community college credit, but admissions are so competitive that I wonder if Baylor will look at classes taken at a community college unfavorably. Has anybody else been in a similar situation and got in?

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Hey Paul,

I can't speak for Baylor, but I know several people at the UW MEDEX program who were admitted with comm college pre-reqs and I interviewed under the same circumstance. (Although they do weigh heavily on previous healthcare experience)...not sure that this is valuable info for you. Good luck!

Justin

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Thanks for the quick and helpful reply, Justin! I've been doing a lot of research and found that very little was said on this topic. Another concern is my lack of exposure in the healthcare system. I've seen some people suggesting getting a job as an EMT or something else that will get my foot in the door, which sounds fine for someone who doesn't already have a job. I am volunteering with the PCU at my local hospital though, but I'm not sure if that's enough. Will schools like Baylor consider my current career with my lack of healthcare exposure and university level prereqs?

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Guest askyoulc

Don't know where you live but I know in Houston, you can do EMT-B training at the local community college on Saturdays. I think it takes a few months for the training, then you do some amount of time of "internship", and finally take the national certifying exam. Btw, I have a friend who's in her first year at Baylor, and she did a bunch of her prereq classes at community college. Hope this helps.

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I don't knowspecifically about Baylor, but I know that several big name schools here in thenortheast work very closely with some community colleges. They know thatstudents go from cc to their school and by working with the cc on content and quality;they ensure the credits they accept are high quality credits. The cc I gotseveral of my prereqs from has agreements with several of the universities thatoffer PA programs and there was no problem with them accepting the prereqs.Baylor may not know about my cc here in NJ but I am prepared to defend mycredits if offered an interview.

 

I worked full-time outside of healthcare as well. I didn't feel that simplevolunteering would differentiate me from those that have a career in healthcareso I took the huge step to leave my computer programming job and got a paid jobin healthcare. It was a big drop in pay, but shows desire and commitment andthat I’m “all-in”. That may be overboard thinking on my part so your mileagemay vary. I did volunteer as an EMT and the EMT-B training alone is excellentprep as the national certification program is no longer a few hours oflearning how to lift and transport but 140 hours of full-system study. It addsabout 16 hours a week to an already 50+ work week. Keep in mind that volunteer EMT'ing is sodifferent than engineering and computer programming that it is a breath offresh air and works a different set of neurons. I did find that after saving alife, I didn't really get upset over the email system being down for a fewhours :)

I don't knowspecifically about Baylor, but I know that several big name schools here in thenortheast work very closely with some community colleges. They know thatstudents go from cc to their school and by working with the cc on content and quality;they ensure the credits they accept are high quality credits. The cc I gotseveral of my prereqs from has agreements with several of the universities thatoffer PA programs and there was no problem with them accepting the prereqs.Baylor may not know about my cc here in NJ but I am prepared to defend mycredits if offered an interview.

 

I worked full-time outside of healthcare as well. I didn't feel that simplevolunteering would differentiate me from those that have a career in healthcareso I took the huge step to leave my computer programming job and got a paid jobin healthcare. It was a big drop in pay, but shows desire and commitment andthat I’m “all-in”. That may be overboard thinking on my part so your mileagemay vary. I did volunteer as an EMT and the EMT-B training alone is excellentprep for PA as the national certification program is no longer a few hours oflearning how to lift and transport but 120 hours of full-system study. It addsabout 16 hours a week to an already 50+ work week. Keep in mind that volunteer EMT'ing is sodifferent than engineering and computer programming that it is a breath offresh air and works a different set of neurons. I did find that after saving alife, I didn't really get upset over the email system being down for a fewhours :)

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  • 2 weeks later...
I'm working full-time right now with a degree in computer engineering, and so I have very few of my prereqs thus far. As long as I continue working, I'm pretty much limited to just classes from community college since only my nights and weekends are open now. I know the Baylor website says they will accept community college credit, but admissions are so competitive that I wonder if Baylor will look at classes taken at a community college unfavorably. Has anybody else been in a similar situation and got in?

 

i took a lot of my classes at a community college...i don't think they will look at it unfavorably - just get A's in all of them and you will be fine :)

 

good luck!

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Thanks for all the responses, everyone. I've done some additional snooping around the boards and on SDN and it appears that community college level classes won't hurt my PA endeavors at Baylor as long as I'm making the grade.

 

GeneValgene, I'm especially interested in talking with you more. As I read more into the profession and people's personal encounters with it, posts with any mention of engineering stuck out to me since that's my undergraduate background. What made you want to leave engineering to pursue a career in medicine? Was it more from engineering leaving a bad taste or medicine being more attractive? I graduated from UT Austin last December with my B.S.E.E. and I've been working at AMD since January. The job pays well and the people are mostly nice, but there's something about the work I'm not finding that engaging. On the other extreme, I've been really captivated by medicine for the last month and a half, especially in the role of PA's in providing healthcare. I haven't completely ruled out if I'm going through a phase, but I will find out over the next few months when I start volunteering at the PCU at my local hospital. Can you share your thought process as you transitioned careers?

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