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Waive rights......


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Ok I did not waive my right to view my reference. I did not read the possible consequences before selecting NO. Does this hurt my chances signifcantly or not? I hope not. I read the reasons as to why it could but.....Why would I waive my right?? That is how I was thinking.

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So if that's the case.....I have done myself no favors. I never thought of any negative connotation surrounding waiving my right. I guess I could see the suspicion but that would not be my initial thought. oh well I can't change it now and just have to hope for the best now.

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If your academic record is ok it is not the end of the world. A lot of people take letters of reference with a grain of salt anyway. I mean, come on - is there anyone on earth that can't find three people to write them a decent letter?

 

If you interviewed, I might be inclined to ask why you didn't waive access.

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When in doubt, waive your right. You might even communicate this to your references before they write your letter. This gives the person who is writing your letter an opportunity to be completely honest with the admissions committee and subsequently, provides a more genuine letter. If you want to see your letters badly, perhaps request that your reference give you a copy of the letter for your records.

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Yeah that's true. I wouldn't mind seeing what each person about me though. I just like knowing their opinion. If I didn't think my LOR writers would not give me a good reference I wouldn't have asked any of them. Just an oversight as far as the waiving rights. I think my brain has been trained to "never waive your rights" and that is the thinking that I applied to CASPA without thoroughly reading the additional information. One school I hope to apply too doesn't use CASPA so hopefully this isn't a huge setback.

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  • 3 weeks later...

The truth is, if you have NOT waived your right through CASPA, CASPA cannot even release a statement anyways. The only way (if you are that desperate to read your letter of recommendation) is after you have been accepted into a program and then request to see your letter of reference directly from that program. At least that is true with CASPA, I am not sure about other programs or application processes. Through CASPA, there is virtually no difference in the overall process, you still have no idea what your references wrote about you until after you have been accepted or rejected. That's how I see it, but I am just a peon.

 

No one asks for a letter of recommendation from someone who they know will write a poor letter.

 

Most letters of recommendation are looked at as an extra hoop you have to jump through anyways.

 

I just don't see a reason to get worried about it. You might get asked about it in an interview, but otherwise, I doubt it will burn you.

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Given that most people get copies of their letters from their references anyway, and that books for various graduate programs recommend you write your own LORs for your references, I find the whole waive/don't waive thing to be an unneccessary, confusing CASPA requirement. Exhibit A: monk1280 and an innocent mistake that may or may not be used against him by some admissions committee member. I asked a lot of people about the waiver/no waiver before I decided and interestingly, my bosses were the only ones who said they personally would not waive their right. I waived my right, however, on the strong advice of others who told me I 'have to play the game' and not give admissions reviewers a chance to suspect a lack of trust in references.

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