Jump to content

Recommended Posts

As a PA school applicant, what made you stand out amongst the other applicants? What attributes or experience has helped you succeed thus far in both the application process and being a successful student?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Having my eyes on the prize. Helped me be very enthusiastic during interview and keeps me going now during this very difficult year. I am sure experience and grades didn't hurt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a 3.98 "Last 30" GPA, a rocking sGPA (mostly because I only had 10 semester hours of 3.0 science from my original undergrad, all the rest were 4.0 prerequisites), great GRE, international medical experience. My 2000 hours as an EMT-Basic were run of the mill for my class.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pink bow tie and my mohawk

 

seriously, in my program, I am run of the mill, middle of the pack. I just got lucky.

 

It had to have been my "Eruption" guitar solo I performed mid-interview.

 

But honestly, I'm pretty sure they dialed the wrong number. Or it was my charming personality and boyish good looks. No, Definitely the former.

I think what stands out for those that get accepted is an understanding of what they're about to embark on, and applying their experiences/attributes to help make up a small piece of an amazing cohort. Most everybody can get the grades, hce, etc...but not everybody is fun to work with. Show them that you're a good person to be around, and that by choosing you they'll be selecting a great representative for the program and the profession.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be honest, I got caught staring out the window while another applicant was answering a question, cracked my knuckles incessantly (despite chanting, "Don't crack your knuckles, don't crack your knuckles," to myself on the drive up - it's a nervous habit), and sweating profusely as I got into a verbal duel with one of the interviewers as he challenged my ethical decision making during a scenario of, "Your SP shows up to work drunk. What do you do?"

 

I have no idea why they picked me. I'm just glad I graduated on the first attempt.

 

Andrew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never interviewed for PA school, but I firmly believe that any job interview I receive is one I'm going to knock out of the park. I believe I'm very personable and I can typically come up with the answers people want to hear, whether that's good or not. While that usually gets me in the door, I think my work ethic solidifies a companies decision to hire me. I really think interviews are geared, as someone stated, for managers/admissions that are looking for a combination of compatibility and competency. Obviously the better you can prove both the better chance you have at being hired or admitted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No idea really. They had positive comments on my HCE. Nothing much to say (positive or negative) about my GPA's which were pretty average for most PA applicants. I think they really liked my PS....kept quoting it during interviews, that was common factor.

 

I had zero problems with the interviews. Things like that don't really bother me. I smiled, answered questions, joked around when I thought something was funny. I purposely didn't rehears...I "shot from the hip". I interviewed at a school that is in my home town (which I will be attending) and I told them that my Mom may or may not come after them if I didn't get in. They laughed....I got in.

 

Sooo, long story short....I think the interviews sealed the deal, but I don't know what got me in the door....stats/PS/HCE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had 3.97 GPA with 3.91 sGPA. My letters of recommendation were great, GRE sucked... But I got my foot through the door. From there on... probably interview, as I did hear back from school in 4 days that I was in. Probably the shortest time ever, hey? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had 3.97 GPA with 3.91 sGPA. My letters of recommendation were great, GRE sucked... But I got my foot through the door. From there on... probably interview, as I did hear back from school in 4 days that I was in. Probably the shortest time ever, hey? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had 3.97 GPA with 3.91 sGPA. My letters of recommendation were great, GRE sucked... But I got my foot through the door. From there on... probably interview, as I did hear back from school in 4 days that I was in. Probably the shortest time ever, hey? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, the essay/narrative is the best way to stand out from the 1000+ applicants initially (and good HCE and shadowing hours to even get them to read your narrative).. And then once you get an interview, being personable goes a long way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, the essay/narrative is the best way to stand out from the 1000+ applicants initially (and good HCE and shadowing hours to even get them to read your narrative).. And then once you get an interview, being personable goes a long way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, the essay/narrative is the best way to stand out from the 1000+ applicants initially (and good HCE and shadowing hours to even get them to read your narrative).. And then once you get an interview, being personable goes a long way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By nakimtang
      Hi everyone, 
      Im a sophomore in college, about to be a junior. I started off in a CC. I’m currently taking a chemistry class that combines OCHEM, biological, and general chem. It is TOUGH! I’m wondering if i’ll make it to PA school. I’m volunteering at a hospital now but have not been going in the last couple of weeks due to having to be at work at 4 am and being completely exhausted after. I am feeling like I don’t have enough time to catch up on volunteering or shadowing. Does anyone have any tips for volunteering and finding someone to shadow? Stories of you also feeling this way? 
      Thanks all, 
      Sienna.
    • By ac2888
      I am currently an undergraduate and I am looking to apply next cycle 2020-2021. I have a list of schools I want to apply to that have pretty late application dates so I could get in as many health care hours as possible before application. I am planning to have ~1000 hours by application and ~2000 prior to matriculation. My GPA and GRE are very high. I have volunteer, leadership, shadowing, and research experience. My question is for schools that do not have a 1000+ hour requirement would it be more beneficial to apply a few months earlier or to wait until I hit the 1000 hour benchmark. Will it make much of a difference? Is it better to apply early because of rolling decisions or try to get as many hours before application?
    • By magboo
      So I finally got a job at my dream hospital!! I am currently working there as a Patient Care Technician/ PCT. However, I will be leaving for PA school next year. I really want to return to this hospital and work as a PA! The problem is that getting a job at my hospital is super competitive. Is there a way for me to ensure/ increase my chances of getting a PA job in this facility in the future?
       
      (Also, what do you guys think of requesting a absense of leave instead of quitting? Can I be able to come back to the hospital to pursue a higher position?)

      Thanks in advance!
    • By alexEMTprePA
      I’ve recently been offered a position as a dialysis tech in an outpatient center. I shadowed the other day and the staff seamed friendly. My main duties would be weighing patients, cannulating them and setting up the machines, drawing labs, and monitoring their vitals throughout treatment. This all would be under the supervisions of an RN. I would work 8 and 10 hour shifts. I was hoping someone who has worked as a dialysis tech or knows someone who has could give me feedback about their experiences. I do already have 2 years experience volunteering as an EMT-A on a fairly busy service and plan on continuing to do so.  
       
      I have also been invited to interview for a medical assistant position at an urgent care, but the interview is after the deadline to decide if I’m going to accept the dialysis position. 
       
      The pros I see in working as a dialysis tech: Getting to know my patients and their cases. Experience in the chronic disease side of medicine. 
       
      Cons: It’s could be repetitive work and I would really only learn about kidney disease.
    • By Kmlkmbl
      Hello,
      I am looking for realistic advice on becoming a surgical PA First Assist. I viewed similar topics within this forum but wanted a more personalized response. This will probably be a long post 😅.
      Here is a little about my background; I’m a 27yr old currently holding only my GED with a certification as a NA. I’ve worked as a CNA for 3years with 2.5 years working on a post surgical unit at my current hospital. I am transferring to sterile processing next month where I plan to work as I attend a CST program. 
      I thought this would be a good field to work in since I will be working directly with the surgical instruments and preparing the kits and trays for each surgery throughout the day. I also plan to obtain my CRST ( certified registered sterile technician) by taking the exam after some more experience on my new job. I originally wanted to go to school to be an OR Nurse or go for my CRNA but after being allowed to observe a few surgeries at work realized I’d rather be more hands on during procedures. My end goal then became wanting to be a first assist.  After speaking with a coworker currently waiting for admission to PA school about it, they suggested becoming a surgical PA. I’m already starting out so late in life... Is it a waste of time to go through the certification of becoming a Surgical Tech? Is it feasible to start a journey to PA so late? I want to be sure that surgery is for me and more than just an interest so figured being a Surgical Tech would help with my decision...I’ve already taken so many detours on the road to furthering my education. I don’t want to delay any further.
       
      I have also looked into the RNFA route but prefer the flexibility when it comes to specialties being a PA. 
       
      All feedback is welcome. Sorry for the long post, and Thanks in advance!
       
       
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More