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The clinical coordinator is a good friend of mine. I know he has been successful in finding multiple new clinical rotation sites for this program. BU has a long history of educating clinicians( my dad

Since people will probably read this thread during next year's round of admissions I just wanted to put in a few words about my experience at the BU interview day. Ultimately I decided not to attend B

I believe it is rolling admissions unless they are changing it from last year. However, there was a pretty good spread from each interview group so I wouldn't worry about enrolling in a later group. I

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The clinical coordinator is a good friend of mine. I know he has been successful in finding multiple new clinical rotation sites for this program. BU has a long history of educating clinicians( my dad went to medschool there in fact) and has the resources to get up to speed quickly. I expect this will be a very solid program.

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I received a phone call from the program director, Mary Warner, yesterday about submitting a professor letter of recommendation (in addition to the three I originally sent through CASPA from a clinician, physician and PA.) Apparently they're not making exceptions on this, even if you've been in the work force for 3+ years.

 

Has anyone received an interview request at this point?

 

 

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I'm wondering if they'll keep sending out interview invitations daily until October 25th (the date specified in their email to applicants)... you know, sort of in a piecemeal way. I sent an email to admissions asking just that and haven't received a response in a couple of days. We shall see.

 

I was verified in late August, so I suppose I have time - it's all about the waiting game these days. Not fun.

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