Jump to content

difference between Per-diem vs part time?


Recommended Posts

Although definitions vary according to entity and location, on the west coast, typically per diem is on as needed basis, no guaranteed hours and no benefits, part-time is anything less that full time, typically 2-3 days per week. At hospitals like Kaiser Permanente, that's all you need for full bennies

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Moderator

I think if you have regular shifts but less than full time hrs, even 1-2 shifts/mo every month you are part time.

per diem is as needed. you might work 10 shifts 1 month and then no shifts for 2 mo then 3 shifts the next mo, etc.

I have a full time job 13 shifts/mo, a part time job 3 shifts/mo, and a per diem job 0-2 shifts/mo.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Moderator
ok got it. my confusion arouse when some jobs are listed as "per-diem" but when you become aware of the scheduling details- the clinic actually provides the scheduled shifts a month ahead with steady 2-3 shifts/week

I would call that part time if it is regular shifts 2-3/week. if the shifts = 20+ hrs/week on a regular basis there out to be some benefits as well.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

We give a lecture to our graduating students in Ohio every year at our annual conference on contract negotiation and hospital policies and we discussed these very issues. These terms when used in employment policies or contracts not only guarantee that you will be given a certain amount of hours but that you'll also be obligated to work the same number of hours. Example: Part-time means that you are scheduled for a certain number of hours per week and usually on a particular day i.e,; 16 hours per week 8 hours per day every Tuesday and Thursday 4 PM-12 PM. Per diem (in Ohio we call it PRN) you tell me how many days you are available and what times and I schedule you to fill in my whole in the schedule because my full-time employees have requested time off. In some cases part-time employees get prorated benefits, per diem generally get a higher hourly rate for working because they do not get paid any benefits( I would make sure I checked on what the going part-time rate is). And the other problem with per diem is that some employers will not guarantee you any shifts while other employers will require you to work a minimum number of shifts in a given period of time( usually one month).

 

I worked for emergency medicine group and was chief PA with 4 other full-time PA's at the site I worked at and we had a handful of PRN PA's. All the full-time PAs got 5 weeks of PTO time.There were months (January, February, March, October, November) where I very seldom used our PRN staff because my full-time people didn't like to take time off those months. The rest of the year I had to make my full-time staff work extra hours because I couldn't find enough PRN staff to cover the hours of the other full-time PAS who are taking their PTO time ,it's a double-edged sore!

 

I hope this helped you. Good luck.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More