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What to put on resume after being fired during orientation period?


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I got fired almost 2 months into my shadowing/training period at a private practice as a new grad. I never saw patients under my own name, since I mostly shadowed. My question is how do I go about this in my future job search/hunt? Do I include this in my resume? Or do I omit it and only mention it if I am asked about it during the interview process? Also what should I say during the interview if I am asked what happened? Nothing awful happened but the reason I was let go was because I didn't appear passionate enough to some physicians. Thank you for any advice!

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Unfortunately, I don't have great advice here. You graduated in Dec, so leaving it off would make it look like you haven't worked at all which is A. Inaccurate, and B. Something is off with your employability because you haven't worked since graduation. And then when conversations of your activities since graduation come up, you look dishonest if and when you say you actually did work as a PA. Hospitals also require you explain any time gaps greater than 60 days when you apply for privileges, so keep that in mind.

Personally, I would put it on my CV and just explain that it wasn't a good fit.

Hopefully others can provide better insight in how to manage this kind of situation you're in 

Edited by SedRate
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Don't lie even by omission. If employers or potential employers find out, and there are ways they might, it will do you in with no possible recovery. No explanation for dishonesty will help.

List it and explain it. "We discovered during my orientation phase it just wasn't a good fit and we parted company by mutual agreement."

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you have to put it down

however most places understand "it was not a good fit"

you need to have an answer to the next question "why was it not a good fit"

You can focus on training, lack of, or even that you did not feel supported enough and were being asked to do things you did not feel ready to do. 

 

 

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6 hours ago, ventana said:

you have to put it down

however most places understand "it was not a good fit"

you need to have an answer to the next question "why was it not a good fit"

You can focus on training, lack of, or even that you did not feel supported enough and were being asked to do things you did not feel ready to do. 

 

 

Do they ever ask to call your past position to confirm the reason? 

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Even in a big city - medical folks know medical folks. Don’t lie.

You never know who was someone’s med school/PA school roommate, preceptor, spouse, former employee.

Reasonably explain the poor fit without embellishment and be consistent. Don’t name names or bash anyone.

”I started the orientation with the practice and found it was not a good match. I had not started seeing patients solo yet and we decided to end the employment.”

They will ask what wasn’t a good fit. 

Some self examination and introspection is key here.

What did YOU learn from the time and how are you implementing change? 

Make it about you, not the short lived job and never personal about someone in that job.

This is an important step at the first moments of your career. Work on this. Get a counselor if needed to work out any issues from the first job. No one likes being fired and it can leave skid marks. Rebound in a healthy way.

Keep it real, brief, consistent and humble.

Just my cranky old 2 cents

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11 hours ago, Reality Check 2 said:

Even in a big city - medical folks know medical folks. Don’t lie.

You never know who was someone’s med school/PA school roommate, preceptor, spouse, former employee.

Reasonably explain the poor fit without embellishment and be consistent. Don’t name names or bash anyone.

”I started the orientation with the practice and found it was not a good match. I had not started seeing patients solo yet and we decided to end the employment.”

They will ask what wasn’t a good fit. 

Some self examination and introspection is key here.

What did YOU learn from the time and how are you implementing change? 

Make it about you, not the short lived job and never personal about someone in that job.

This is an important step at the first moments of your career. Work on this. Get a counselor if needed to work out any issues from the first job. No one likes being fired and it can leave skid marks. Rebound in a healthy way.

Keep it real, brief, consistent and humble.

Just my cranky old 2 cents

Thank you for this! Will work on myself for sure. Do you think it would be overstepping boundaries if I email the main physician to ask what he saw in me that he believed to be disinterest after being with him for the last week? I just want to know how I misrepresented myself because I thought I was asking a lot of questions and was engaged, but clearly he saw something missing 

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On 8/22/2023 at 8:15 AM, Hemmingway said:

Don't lie even by omission. If employers or potential employers find out, and there are ways they might, it will do you in with no possible recovery. No explanation for dishonesty will help.

List it and explain it. "We discovered during my orientation phase it just wasn't a good fit and we parted company by mutual agreement."

Very smooth answer! bravo!

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47 minutes ago, eluch15 said:

Thank you for this! Will work on myself for sure. Do you think it would be overstepping boundaries if I email the main physician to ask what he saw in me that he believed to be disinterest after being with him for the last week? I just want to know how I misrepresented myself because I thought I was asking a lot of questions and was engaged, but clearly he saw something missing 

There is nothing wrong with asking but be prepared. They may have something to say that you will find hurtful. More likely they won't answer but you never know. Approach it from the "I'm trying to improve myself" angle and they may be receptive and responsive.

It doesn't mean you have to take everything you are told as gospel but a smart friend of mine used to say "perception is reality" so how you are perceived, regardless of your intention, matters.

Good luck!

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9 hours ago, eluch15 said:

Thank you for this! Will work on myself for sure. Do you think it would be overstepping boundaries if I email the main physician to ask what he saw in me that he believed to be disinterest after being with him for the last week? I just want to know how I misrepresented myself because I thought I was asking a lot of questions and was engaged, but clearly he saw something missing 

Honestly don’t waste your time or energy.  
this doc will have their own opinion which is exceptionally clouded by their own thoughts and experiences.   You will very possibly be steered wrong by by putting any weight on their reply.  
just move on.  Self reflection and feedback from peers you trust.  

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I'm in a similar situation as eluch15. I was let go this morning after six weeks at my first job at a family medicine clinic. I went from seeing no patients each day (shadowing) to seeing four, then six, then eight, then ten patients each day. They said that the patients really liked me but that I was struggling with the multi-tasking (responding to labs & X-ray reports & messages quickly enough as they were coming in, etc.) and being more efficient. I explained to them that I'm going to get there, that it's just going to take a little more time because it's all new to me. But they said they couldn't wait for that. Obviously I'm very depressed today, as I really liked this clinic & wanted to stay there for a long time. I know that I have to list this clinic on my job applications going forward & be honest about my termination. Has anyone else experienced this or can give me advice going forward? Will my state medical board record be forever tarnished now or can it be salvaged? Feel free to private message me as well if you can.

Edited by PAGothamCity
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Your state medical board status won't be affected at all. Don't worry about that. It won't go on your permanent record. 🙂 If they fired you for harming a patient they might report it to the board but even that is 50/50.

Stumbling at your first position is way more common than you might imagine and likely won't cause you any issues. It will require an explanation as you go forward with interviews but any hiring manager worth their salt should get it and not be too concerned. Just have your explanation in your pocket and don't say anything negative and it shouldn't be any big problem.

You'll bounce back. Promise.

Edited by Hemmingway
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Thank you, Scott. I'm feeling really discouraged right now as I try to look for other positions at other family medicine clinics. As was mentioned here in this thread, I'm definitely doing as much self-reflection as possible to make sure that I don't make the same mistakes going forward. I hope that, like you said, hiring managers will be sympathetic to it being the learning curve at someone's first job.

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Family Medicine is herd medicine now - round em up, move em in, shoot em through, NEXT..............

Corporate owned Family Medicine and small private practices think VOLUME = Success.

I am ashamed that ANYONE thinks a new grad or new hire can be up to FULL BORE days at 6 weeks.

I would not take that too deeply into your psyche. 

When looking at new jobs - perhaps find a way to phrase and require an onboarding process of 6 months if possible.

Draw out a plan if possible for ramping up patient visit numbers and panel size that is logical and not $$ oriented.

It is indeed an art to managing patient phone calls, lab results, imaging results, walk ins, interruptions, etc.

Ask specific questions about your team - do you have LPN/LVN, MAs, any RNs? 

Share the wealth based on licensure. MAs can only parrot what you say back to the patient and not triage or expand on anything. Licensed nurses have more latitude (and hopefully the brains/common sense) and can triage and give advice within their scope of practice.

Any PCP needs to be set up for success. If you don't have a team that can adequately support you, too many patients, not enough hours in the day - you will fail. 

Start a list of things that were labeled as "wrong" in this job and start asking questions here or of someone local to you who could be a mentor.

I think all new grads should have a mentor - I still have mentors and collaborating colleagues and I do not practice alone. 

Hang in there!!

 

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Thank you, Reality Check 2.

I had a great supervising doc there & all my decisions were going through her. She was letting me start seeing patients on my own, too (the more straightforward cases) - which felt great. I know that if I just had a little more time, I would have been successful there. I'm doing as much self-reflection as I can. My goal at the end of the day is, like everyone here, to be a good clinician. The only thing I can do now is keep applying & trying to find another primary care site where I can keep growing.

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On 8/24/2023 at 11:13 AM, PAGothamCity said:

I'm in a similar situation as eluch15. I was let go this morning after six weeks at my first job at a family medicine clinic. I went from seeing no patients each day (shadowing) to seeing four, then six, then eight, then ten patients each day. They said that the patients really liked me but that I was struggling with the multi-tasking (responding to labs & X-ray reports & messages quickly enough as they were coming in, etc.) and being more efficient. I explained to them that I'm going to get there, that it's just going to take a little more time because it's all new to me. But they said they couldn't wait for that. Obviously I'm very depressed today, as I really liked this clinic & wanted to stay there for a long time. I know that I have to list this clinic on my job applications going forward & be honest about my termination. Has anyone else experienced this or can give me advice going forward? Will my state medical board record be forever tarnished now or can it be salvaged? Feel free to private message me as well if you can.

ugh

audible forehead slp

 

Six weeks gives you about enough time to learn the computer, figure out staff names, learn where the bathroom and break room is

 

As a 20+ year PA the last place mandated a 3m onboarding for me..... was annoying as heck

AS a new grad you need at least 6m if not 12 to find your pace

 

honestly be glad they let you go as that environment is toxic for a new grad.

 

It is all over this forum but the first job about the only thing that matters is good mentoring.... hang in there.

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1 hour ago, ventana said:

Six weeks gives you about enough time to learn the computer, figure out staff names, learn where the bathroom and break room is

New grad asked in a different forum yesterday about this "job" offer.... psych practice, 1 week of orientation and then full pt load of 22 to 24 a day for 106k and no benefits.

It made my head hurt to even have to reply.

There are plenty of times when the failure is on the employer.

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