Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

New Grad in NC. Waiting to get credentialed is taking FOREVER!!

Recommended Posts

I am a new grad, and accepted a really good fam practice/peds offer in NC.

I wanted to move and start work ASAP, but the board is telling me FOUR MONTHS for my license credentials.

 

The office is telling me I can't start until then, but I was under the impression that I could be trained while waiting? Anyway, that is the impression they gave me in the interview. The doc seems urgent for me to start, emailing me everyday asking how things are going, but the practice administrator is not budging. I am kind of in limbo with everything else in my life right now (finances, living situation, boyfriend quit his job, etc) soo would it be out of line for me to ask them to give me an estimated date? Now, I am just waiting for the board.. and don't know if I need to get another job, move, etc. while waiting.

 

And does it really truly take FOUR MONTHS?!?!

 

Thanks for your help :)

 

Jenni

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are talking about getting a NC license, correct? In my case, I knew I'd be working in NC after grad so I started the application process and had all my materials in several months before graduation. I found out I passed PANCE on Thursday and the license was emailed to me the following Tuesday.

 

If you already have your -C and are then starting the process, yes, I wouldn't be surprised if it takes a while; we were advised to start the process early for that reason. If I had to guess though, they probably tell you four months to hedge, but it won't really take that long.

 

I think they have to make you wait to start in clinic for liability purposes, since you're not really licensed to practice medicine yet...have you asked about shadowing the doc while you're waiting, though? You may be able to convince them to let you do that with the provision that you can't touch any patients until your license comes through. That would at least let you get more familiar with your SP and the work flow of the office while you're waiting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reply. Sorry I did not see it until now. Unfortunately, my school did not give me any insight into the licensing process and it was a complete shot in the dark for me. Before getting my C i was too worried about the PANCE and really didn't know all the paperwork and $ it would require. Again, blaming my school for that one. But in hindsight, guess I should have done more research. Also had some financial difficulty so that didnt help either.. but, still waiting for my license!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just so you know, your school really dropped the ball on not providing at least minimum education into licensing and credentialing. I'm almost sure it's an ARC-PA requirement to do so...worth making a complaint to your clin Ed dept, and further if that doesn't get you any satisfaction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep...

For a DECADE... We have been posting on here that PA students should be doing licensing paperwork at least 6 months before graduation either in the state you want to work in or in the state your program is in. As its quicker to get a license in another state if you already have one in the state you are in.

 

The idea is to have all paperwork (fingerprinting, background check, NPDB, etc) completed and the only 2 pieces left being your program transcript and PANCE results.

 

Doing this made it the reason why Exactly 10 days after I passed the PANCE... I recieved 3 state licenses in the mail: 1 California PA License, 1 California FNP License, 1 Washington state PA License.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Brown
      Hi Friends,
      I'm trying to develop a bit more privacy than is the default on the PA Board website. In CA, is there a way to put your work address as the one on file, or would you have to get a PO box should you desire to not have your home address listed on a license search?
      Thanks much!
    • By Texicana210
      [deleted]
    • By surgblumm
      In this day of selivering bad news, I thought that this article that I saved from last year would be a great refresher. Food is food regardless of the source.

       



       
      The Rules for Delivering Bad News to Patients

      August 27, 2019

      The Watercooler: Career Advice

      The Bookbag: Education

      The Rounds: Clinical Considerations

      General

      0 Comments



      I've talked to some colleagues recently who've been a little down about their roles as nurse practitioners. Working in family practice, they have found themselves in the position of delivering bad or upsetting news to their patients. Cancer diagnoses were fortunately made rather than missed, but letting a patient know they've got a serious, life-altering illness or condition is tough, not to mention, this is not something most of us as NPs learn to do in school. 

      Have you ever found yourself in the position of delivering difficult news to patients? How did you feel? Having such conversations as nurse practitioners can make us anxious or awkward. Some of us approach these discussions emotionally while others appear detached and robotic in their delivery of the news. Delivering bad news is an unavoidable part of our jobs as nurse practitioners but that doesn't mean we get used to it. Fortunately, however, conducting serious conversations is a skill that can be learned and there are many guidelines out there to help healthcare providers hone this skill set. 

      Rule #1: Know what constitutes bad news

      Sometimes I share information with a patient that I perceive as not a big deal. Then, the patient starts to freak out. Or cry. Or to have some other sort of emotional reaction that I didn't anticipate. Bad news doesn't have to be a terminal diagnosis. It can be related to anything surrounding a diagnosis such as timing, personal or professional consequences. Breaking a metatarsal and wearing a boot, for example, may not be too bad in the grand scheme of things, but breaking your foot the day before your wedding is pretty disappointing. 

      Rule #2: Full disclosure is best

      In the past, healthcare providers operated on a more guarded front. In the 1800's, for example, the American Medical Association even encouraged physicians to avoid sharing news that discouraged patients. Today, however, studies (not to mention ethics!) show that most patients prefer full disclosure. It's our duty as nurse practitioners to share up-front, honest information rather than sugar coat our delivery with excessive optimism, withhold details, or give false hope. Share news with the patient directly rather than directing it toward family members. Honest, trustworthy information is empowering! 

      Rule #3: Prepare yourself

      Anticipate the conversation you're about to have with your patient. You may even wish to practice your delivery with a colleague. Prepare yourself to feely badly as you share the news. And, don't forget that silence is OK. Avoid the temptation to fill gaps in your conversation rather let the patient process and take the time to formulate questions. 

      Rule #4: Frame the conversation

      Framing the news you're about to share is essential. Your patient may or may not be expecting to hear something difficult. And, the way you set up your conversation has an impact on the patient's reaction. Using the word "serious" (ex. "I have some serious news to share...") is better than using the word "bad". "Serious" creates a more constructive framework that inspires action and empowerment as opposed to the word "bad" which indicates the situation is helpless. Even if you're delivering a terminal diagnosis, your patient can choose how to react and what steps they wish to take in response. 

      Rule #5: Think SPIKES

      There are a few well-known methods for delivering serious news to patients, my favorite of which is the SPIKES method. This algorithm lays out considerations for nurse practitioners and other healthcare providers in these situations. Here's the SPIKES protocol:  

      Setup - Think through the conversation you're about to have, anticipating questions the patient might ask beforehand. Prepare for an emotional reaction. Gather any necessary resources that might be helpful for the patient. 

      Perception - Gauge the patient's understanding and perspective on the news you have shared. This is best accomplished by asking questions like "What did you take away from what I just shared with you?" or "What are your expectations of treatment?". This way you know you are both on the same page as far as understanding the medical outlook, next steps and goals. 

      Invitation - Encourage the patient to think further about their care going forward. Find out how much information the patient wants about his or her medical condition as well as who he/she would like to be included in decision making such as family members. 

      Knowledge - This step has to do with how you as a provider deliver information. The best practice is to deliver the headline first, followed by the details. Communicate using language that matches the patient's level of education and medical knowledge. Be direct in your delivery, avoid skirting the main message. 

      Empathy - Understandably, patients get emotional about serious news. Anticipate such a reaction and display empathy. Naming the patient's emotions can help. Asking "Can you tell me more about what you mean by that?" will also help you determine how the patient feels about the situation. 

      Summarize and Strategize - Make a plan for the next steps in both treatment and communication with your patient. Express support and encourage the patient to tell friends and family the news to develop a personal support system. Talk about how the patient can act on this news to accomplish his or her treatment and lifestyle goals going forward. 

      Have you ever delivered bad news to a patient? How did it go?

    • By PASav
      Hi All!
      First and foremost, I appreciate any and all feedback. I am a December 2019 graduate and am starting my first PA job this week (amongst the COVID crisis...perfect timing...) 
      I have, for as long as I can remember, struggled with feeling like I don't belong, am not good enough, am not smart enough, etc. and this has transformed into anxiety about being an inadequate provider. I am extremely excited to start caring for patients and I have the desire to learn as much as I possibly can, but I constantly have this nagging thought at the back of my head telling me that I am going to fail. That I'll hurt people due to lack of knowledge. That my attending and peers will think I'm dumb or that I'm not catching on quick enough. 
      For those of you who have been practicing for a while, or even if you're a new grad who has found ways to deal with this - please help! I need some reassurance that my fellow PAs have not only felt this way, but found ways to overcome it. Thanks again!
    • By StrugglingNewGrad20
      I graduated from a PA program in Michigan in August and am still struggling to find a job more than 6 months later. I live in West Michigan and have applied to over 100 jobs within an hour radius of my home. I have had only a handful of phone interviews and 2 in-person interviews during this time. I feel like I interview very well, and am unsure what else I can do to increase my chances of securing a job. I have even reached out to recruiters from nearby hospital systems with no success. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. 
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More