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I am a past residency graduate and now an assistant program director - Ask me anything about PA residencies, and check out my new guidebook for PA residency programs!


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Hello all!  As some of the long time forum crew may know, I wrote a blog about my experience going through an EM PA residency program in 2015.  A lot has happened since then... I've gone on to become a lead PA in the ED and even founded our own EM PA/NP residency program at our group (going to keep the program anonymous as I don't want this to be viewed as advertising).  I am also very excited to share a project that I've been working on for a long time now... a guide book for PA/NP students applying to and completing residency programs!  

It is the book that I wish I had before starting my program.  I definitely struggled through a lot of the program.  I loved the struggle, but it was still rough, and it could have gone much smoother.  The goal of this book is to give you the insider info to know what challenges to expect each step of the way and how to deal with them like a pro.  

I wanted to open this thread as an "Ask me anything" post.  I'd be happy to answer any questions you might have about the residency experience, application, admissions, completion, rotations... whatever you'd like!

-SN

 

Check out the link to the amazon page for the book. Let me know what you think!

 

Here is some of the content...


Overview of PA/NP post-graduate training programs

  • What they are, what they offer, the different types of programs you’ll find, and the pros & cons of each.
  • Checklists for key areas to assess in each program you research.
  • Deciding which program is right for you.
  • Examples of what the daily life and roles of real PA/NP residents looks like as they go through training.


The application and admission process

  • The prerequisites, components of your application, and how to become the best possible candidate.
  • The interview questions you’ll be asked, how to interview well and get a spot in your dream program.


The residency journey, the challenges you’ll face, and tools to succeed

  • How to prepare for the start of the program.
  • How to maneuver your first months in your new department.
  • Review of a few key medical topics that challenge every trainee.
  • How to write professional notes, call consults and admissions.
  • How to survive on medical, surgical, and off-service rotations.
  • How to deal with other common challenges in residency.


Graduating residency and finding your first job

  • How to write a strong CV.
  • Tips for applying and successfully leveraging your residency experience in contract negotiations.
  • Key things to look for in your job contract.


Your first job after residency training

  • Transitioning to your new role safely.
  • Risk management pearls.
  • Foundational personal finance steps to take with your first job.
  • The learning journey in medicine that lays ahead of you.

 

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Edited by SERENITY NOW
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Hey I've been reading your book and am enjoying it! Currently an S2 about ~6 months out from graduating.  I'm very interested in both EM and surgical residencies.  Any advise for how to apply to both? Do I mention it or no? Is it looked upon poorly if they discover I'm applying to two different specialities? 

Thanks! 

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On 10/22/2022 at 8:07 AM, dacks663 said:

Hey I've been reading your book and am enjoying it! Currently an S2 about ~6 months out from graduating.  I'm very interested in both EM and surgical residencies.  Any advise for how to apply to both? Do I mention it or no? Is it looked upon poorly if they discover I'm applying to two different specialities? 

Thanks! 

Thank you so much for your support!  If you have any feedback on the book please send it my way 🙂

 

Great question.  By all means apply to both!  You can keep your options open, giving you time to reflect on what it is that you want long term.  Also you'll be able to hear what the jobs would entail through interviews so that you'd have more data to help make your decision.  

I would definitely advise that you don't mention applying to other specialties in your applications or interviews.  We have already had one trainee get accepted to our program and then decide after the fact they didn't like EM as much as they'd hoped and switched specialties.  Now we are very keen on making sure it is people who are 100% committed to the specialty.  That is logical from the program's perspective, but if you feel like you'd be happy and stick with either specialty, I wouldn't want you to be eliminated from consideration simply because of that fact.  

I doubt that they would discover you are applying to another specialty unless if you told them.  Just be careful to tell your references who are writing letters of reference that they'll need two versions of their letter.  If we get a LOR that is written for a different specialty that would not look good haha.  I hope that answers your question!  Please let me know if you have any others. 

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  • 4 weeks later...
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I have lots of students shooting for EM postgrad programs. Is it fair to say that if you are a reasonable student, have good LORs, and apply to 5 programs that you should get into one?

I hope so, because that is what I have been saying for years...without much evidence to support it...😏

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On 11/19/2022 at 11:22 PM, EMEDPA said:

I have lots of students shooting for EM postgrad programs. Is it fair to say that if you are a reasonable student, have good LORs, and apply to 5 programs that you should get into one?

I hope so, because that is what I have been saying for years...without much evidence to support it...😏

That's a good question and a pretty complicated one.  I think applications have risen pretty steadily over the past decade, as the job market has gotten saturated and it has been harder for people to jump right into the sought after generalist jobs (EM/IM/CCM etc) as a new grad.  At this point we usually have numerous applicants each cycle who meet all of those criteria you listed.  If you were to add one more criteria, "interviews well," then I think the answer would be yes.  But if they interview poorly, they might not get a spot anywhere.  Just my 2cents...

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