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Tips to finding MA position with no experience


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Hello,

I am a recent bachelors graduate with no experience in the medical field (I only have a BLS/CPR license) and have been searching for a medical assistant position. I am located in Boynton/Delray/Boca, Florida. Any tips only how to apply/search for these positions when I have non experience? What is the best way to contact these offices? 

Thank you! 

Edited by ppastudent20
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It is 100% possible to land an MA job without a certification (I used to hire MAs and train them on the job). It does require some searching though so here are my best tips:

1. Look on job boards like Indeed and get a LinkedIn account set up. You can apply directly through these sites for any jobs that they post. You can also search the job postings for local hospitals and clinics in your area.

2. Dermatology offices routinely hire MAs and do all their training in house. Google Derm + Your Area and look to see if they have any job postings on their websites. There are large derm networks that often run multiple offices and hire lots of MAs. You can find all of these just by searching the web.

3. Are you from the area you're currently in? Do you have connections to practices/clinics in the area via your friends, family, or own providers? Shoot those connections a quick note to say that you're looking for a job and to please keep you in mind if they hear of anything. The key is to just get on their radar. You never know who may know of something!

4. If you're not already, get signed up to volunteer in a local clinic or hospital system. This will give you SOME sort of healthcare experience but will also provide networking opportunities.

5. Make sure your resume is ON POINT. It will be harder to break in to the field without experience so you need to show how whatever experiences you DO have will translate. Have you worked in retail or customer service? Use those to show what a great communicator you are and how well you work with people. Do you have volunteer experience that's related to healthcare? Include that on your resume. I often broke my resume in to "Healthcare Experience" and "Work Experience" when I was job searching.

6. Consider expanding your search beyond just MA. See if your local blood bank/Red Cross will train you as a phlebotomist. Scribing is also a good place start. I've loved being an MA but if you're having trouble finding openings, don't be afraid to broaden your search.

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  • 1 month later...

I was in your position as well and the post above is great. I basically did everything they suggested. I started as a medical scribe which I used as experience to get my medical assistant job and then used that experience to get my now nursing assistant job. I got all of these positions only with a bachelors, no experience, and no certification. Schools like diversity in PCE! You can definitely get a MA job right off the bat, but have better chances if you have some relevant experience. Also, apply everywhere, even if it says "requires an MA certification" because you can still get in and they can train you. When I got my MA job, I think applied to like a hundred jobs.

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