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Critical Care as a new grad


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Throughout my clinical year, I have been bitten by the critical care bug, and have become obsessed with the prospect of beginning my PA career in this field. I have had numerous elective rotations that have allowed me to work in a variety of critical care settings both as a primary ( CCM, CCS in academic medical centers, CCM in a non-academic setting) as well as inpatient consult services (Nephrology and Cardiology in CVICU and MICU) and by the time that I graduate I will have close to a thousand hours of critical care experience. While I understand that many recommend completing a residency in critical care as a new grad, this is not really a feasible option for me at this time. In starting my job search, it seems that there are limited options for new graduates in this field. I have currently expanded my job search to the entire western half of the US, but the job prospects seem paltry in critical care right now. How does someone like myself go about breaking into CCM? Do I need to spend years working in another field such as hospital medicine to get a start or is there some secret that I don't know about to land a CCM job? I am currently in school far from anywhere I would want to live and cannot rely on the traditional networking through my preceptors as their networks have all been in the same region I attend school. 

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On 7/7/2021 at 8:13 AM, thepraxicianwillseeyounow said:

Throughout my clinical year, I have been bitten by the critical care bug, and have become obsessed with the prospect of beginning my PA career in this field. I have had numerous elective rotations that have allowed me to work in a variety of critical care settings both as a primary ( CCM, CCS in academic medical centers, CCM in a non-academic setting) as well as inpatient consult services (Nephrology and Cardiology in CVICU and MICU) and by the time that I graduate I will have close to a thousand hours of critical care experience. While I understand that many recommend completing a residency in critical care as a new grad, this is not really a feasible option for me at this time. In starting my job search, it seems that there are limited options for new graduates in this field. I have currently expanded my job search to the entire western half of the US, but the job prospects seem paltry in critical care right now. How does someone like myself go about breaking into CCM? Do I need to spend years working in another field such as hospital medicine to get a start or is there some secret that I don't know about to land a CCM job? I am currently in school far from anywhere I would want to live and cannot rely on the traditional networking through my preceptors as their networks have all been in the same region I attend school. 

Look for jobs at academic centers.  Many of the major university systems in the PNW will hire new grads. There was a group in Eugene, OR which hires new grads on occasion. 

Definitely one of the easier fields to kill someone in (or let them die a little earlier to be honest) so we have a tendency to want folks to have some experience before joining up, especially if there isn't that safety net of academics.

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7 hours ago, thepraxicianwillseeyounow said:

Thanks, I appreciate it. Academic centers are definitely on my list. 

University of Washington's CT Surg and CCU services will often hire new grads, Legacy Emanuel in Portland will hire new grads to their Trauma service, OHSU has been known to pick up new grads as well.

Group in Eugene was Oregon Pulmonary Associates I believe, they operate out of PeaceHealth. Had the chance to meet one of their PAs once, she was hot #!*+ at her job, runs a tight show from what I hear.

Good luck!

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  • 3 months later...

I've seen several CCM jobs that are "new-grad friendly," or are actually seeking new grads.  So if you look deep enough, they are out there. If that's not happening, consider doing CCM fellowship/residency.  If that doesn't pan out and you find a job that will hire you, make absolute sure they will give you considerable (minimum 6 months) of intense training and guidance.  

Academic centers are designed for... academics, but often these places will have a full roster of medical students, residents, and fellows that you will be competing with for patients and procedures.  If you go into a community or non-academic institution you won't have these troubles.

 

There's a bunch of ways doing it, but it all comes down to what works best for you and how you are going to get the best training.

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