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Should I leave my job for a different one in the same hospital?


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Hey all, 

Looking for some input regarding a job opportunity I've recently received. I work full time (paid for 80 hrs bi-weekly, though work far more) for a general surgery group, which focuses primarily on bariatrics (3 years in). Pre-covid, I moonlighted down the hall in the ER for extra cash. The ER has approached me about coming back in some capacity, and has made me a full time offer which would bring in much more money, schedule flexibility, and better benefits. I love my surgical group and they have been great to me, but staying late most nights for no additional pay has become tiring, and the procedures we do are now watered down to 95% bariatrics, and I don't do much on my own outside of this (the occasional I&D, punch biopsy, etc. but no lines, nothing more exciting-I mainly first assist). I see patients in the office which consists now of 95% weight loss counseling, which is not really surgical. Overall I'm a bit disenfranchised with the position itself, despite being close with my group members. Our hospital's surgical side is in a bit of a rebuilding phase, so my absence would be felt tremendously. Short-staffed, overworked, etc. All in all, it is a decidedly bad time for them to lose more personnel. 

I originally got into healthcare for emergency medicine, and this opportunity comes along at a poor moment, but the flexibility and income are very difficult to pass up. I'd be seeing my current group fairly frequently, and in fact waking them up in the middle of the night for consults. They are all reasonable and would not take it personally, but overall I'd be putting them in a tough spot and then throwing salt in the wound 

Any input or advice would be much appreciated. 

Best. 

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Take the EM job. It has all the pros you seek to be looking for. While there is a certain degree of loyalty to one's group that I think is necessary, that is usually paid out by giving an appropriate amount of notice prior to leaving and not just saying SEEYA.

While their staffing issues are unfortunate it's not your fault nor, to be blunt, your problem. If they have trouble attracting and/or keeping staff it sounds like they should be changing either pay/schedule/responsibilities.

Congratulations!

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I think you have to do whatever that is the best for you, especially when these opportunities don't come easy. I believe that if you handle this professionally, such as giving your current employer notice in advance (whatever the amount of time that has been listed in your contract), your current employer will understand. If they don't and take it personally, that's really their problem and there is really nothing else that you are obligated to do in this situation. 

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Honestly most places don’t realize they have a problem till people leave.   Be professional.  Work extra hard.  Do not sling mud but tell them honestly why you are leaving (sounds like you have very valid reasons).   You might be helping the next PA by getting the department to look at how they utilize PA.  

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Unfortunately, working too many hours seems to be more commonplace than it should.  It is not right that we are salaried therefore others feel it is acceptable we do not have enough time left in the day to lead a healthy lifestyle and have a personal/family life.  After too many years of this I feel retirement is the only option.  Don't fall into the trap.  

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I had to laugh when I read you post. I was in almost the exact same boat 20 years ago. I was doing 12-14 hours days with an understaffed open heart group. When I told them I was leaving for an ER job, one of the docs asked what it would take to make me stay. I told him that I would be working approximately 100 less days a year in the ER with pretty much the same pay. 

They couldn't match that. 🤪

 

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1 hour ago, SHU-CH said:

I had to laugh when I read you post. I was in almost the exact same boat 20 years ago. I was doing 12-14 hours days with an understaffed open heart group. When I told them I was leaving for an ER job, one of the docs asked what it would take to make me stay. I told him that I would be working approximately 100 less days a year in the ER with pretty much the same pay. 

They couldn't match that. 🤪

 

Yeah that's essentially my problem. Well...one of them. In the ER I can make the same amount working less, or work the same amount and make much more. That, and my waning belief in what I do/boredom doing it. I need some variety. 

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I agree with the above... make the move. There is nothing wrong with doing what you think is best for you when it is done in  a polite and professional way. These days good opportunities are hard to come by and having one fall in your lap is like seeing Bigfoot walking his unicorn. It's rare.

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