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Leaving a position off a resume, is it okay to do so?


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I started at an urgent care and did some training shifts- their policy is that you are not under contract during this and that the contract starts after (that way you actually know if you want to stay). Since you see patients during the training, they give you malpractice coverage + tail insurance which was great.

Long story short, I left as it was not a good fit. It was meant for a seasoned provider and they stated that they didn't offer medical training and only EMR training. Since this happened, I left it off my resume because I was never under contract. I guess my worry is- was that okay to do? I just got hired and I know it'll show when I get credentialed (because credentialing occurred months before the trial period). I don't want to be seen like I was dishonest by not listing it. I literally left after the training shifts and immediately got an offer a week after somewhere else.

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I don't see that it would be a problem to omit it from your resume.  The resume/CV is supposed to be a list of your major accomplishments, not everywhere you've ever been.  For example, I had a part-time job at an urgent care.  I did a few shifts at the internal medicine practice across the street owned by the same doc while the classmate who worked there was on maternity leave.  I don't mention that, it's just too small.  I doubt your few shifts at this UC would even come up or be detectable during credentialing.

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I think I'm still an employee of the local ambulance service where I was contracted to do direct EMT in-service training for a while, before they reached a memorandum of understanding with the county for them to host county-sponsored training.  I think I did maybe 8-10 hours of training total for them 3 years ago... It's not on my CV, and I don't feel bad leaving it off.

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Thank you both for your input! It has been a whirlwind of a month for me- from leaving UC to now getting hired onto EM. I figured if the credentialing specialist sees it, I'll just explain what happened. I appreciate your replies- still a new PA trying to navigate through the first years of practice. 🙂 

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Hmm. I've heard of people losing jobs because of things like this. If you were credentialed there then I'd make sure it's on your resume. Just explain you worked a few shifts and realized it wasn't an appropriate position for a new graduate.

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7 hours ago, Lexapro said:

Hmm. I've heard of people losing jobs because of things like this.

If the application instructions are to include every job ever worked in X period, then yes, you could be fired for lying on the signed application. That's why some places specifically want you to list things on their application form, which will have those specific instructions, and will not accept a resume or CV in lieu of their application.

But that wasn't the OIP's question.

 

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If it's for a job that doesn't require hospital credentialing, then it's probably OK to leave off.

But on a credentialing application, if you leave it off and they find out about it, not only are they likely to fire you but they are likely to report you to the NPDB too which will follow you for the rest of your life.

Better just to put it on.

 

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After a long career, and the first part during the difficult years of being a PA (1980s) and several job changes, I started to leave off one 6-month job and a moonlighting job for the sake of brevity. The only time it became an issue was when I was suing a hospital for breach of contract years later they tried to pin in on me during a deposition as if I were hiding something they had found during their "discover" phase. I gave them the phone number and told them to call the employers that were not mentioned on my CV (left both with good standings). It became a mute point and I prevailed in the case.

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If the job requires any credentialing you have to have it on there. Some places will rescind the offer if your CV doesn't match the credentialing application and you have to have ALL jobs in the credentialing application. But if you're applying to say a outpatient only solo practice you could leave it off. 

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  • 2 months later...
On 5/31/2021 at 10:43 AM, Lexapro said:

Hmm. I've heard of people losing jobs because of things like this. If you were credentialed there then I'd make sure it's on your resume. Just explain you worked a few shifts and realized it wasn't an appropriate position for a new graduate.

I think this is good advice. Its easy enough to explain but omitting it could be seen as being less than honest or even trying to hide something and that is a nearly unforgivable sin.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 8/16/2021 at 1:54 PM, sas5814 said:

I think this is good advice. Its easy enough to explain but omitting it could be seen as being less than honest or even trying to hide something and that is a nearly unforgivable sin.

What if you don’t include on your CV but disclose?  

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