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Hi all, 
I have been accepted into PA school and am starting to have second thoughts. The initial plan was to graduate and specialize in psychiatry. I have an interest in psychology and neurology.  Becoming an MD is out of the question, as I can't move (military family).  I have found one accredited Ph.D. distance program in Clinical Psychology. I have considered going that route but am scared I'll regret not going PA. This time last year, I was thrilled to get an interview.  Is it normal to have cold feet?  Has anyone else made a similar choice? Anyways, thanks for listening. 

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1 hour ago, wildassignment86 said:

Hi all, 
I have been accepted into PA school and am starting to have second thoughts. The initial plan was to graduate and specialize in psychiatry. I have an interest in psychology and neurology.  Becoming an MD is out of the question, as I can't move (military family).  I have found one accredited Ph.D. distance program in Clinical Psychology. I have considered going that route but am scared I'll regret not going PA. This time last year, I was thrilled to get an interview.  Is it normal to have cold feet?  Has anyone else made a similar choice? Anyways, thanks for listening. 

Anytime you are faced with options, it is not surprising to have second thoughts. You only get to take one road (at a time; you can sure change again later on).  Talk to some PAs in psych and some PhD psychologists and see what their lives are like. Then just quiet down, live your life, and the answer will hopefully come to you.

Stay calm and take it a small step at a time.

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27 minutes ago, UGoLong said:

 

Anytime you are faced with options, it is not surprising to have second thoughts. You only get to take one road (at a time; you can sure change again later on).  Talk to some PAs in psych and some PhD psychologists and see what their lives are like. Then just quiet down, live your life, and the answer will hopefully come to you.

Stay calm and take it a small step at a time.

Thank you, this was just what I needed to hear. 

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