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up to $110,000 for this?

Qualifications

  • State Licensure (DO, MD, PA-C, NP, EMT-P)
  • ACLS
  • PALS
  • Trauma Certification (PHTLS, ATLS, TNATC…)
  • NRP
  • Pass all entry testing
  • Must maintain all certifications without interruption for the duration of employment.
  • Must be able to lift 80lbs at a minimum of waist height. Additionally, must be able to walk, climb, stoop, crouch, kneel, balance, as well as demonstrate sufficient manual dexterity, audial faculty, and visual acuity (aided or unaided) to perform required duties to include an acceptable weight for helicopter operations.
  • Must pass both pre-hire and random post-hire drug-screening exams.

 

 

Maybe as a medic, but a PA in this roll is $150k

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5 hours ago, ventana said:

up to $110,000 for this?

Qualifications

  • State Licensure (DO, MD, PA-C, NP, EMT-P)
  • ACLS
  • PALS
  • Trauma Certification (PHTLS, ATLS, TNATC…)
  • NRP
  • Pass all entry testing
  • Must maintain all certifications without interruption for the duration of employment.
  • Must be able to lift 80lbs at a minimum of waist height. Additionally, must be able to walk, climb, stoop, crouch, kneel, balance, as well as demonstrate sufficient manual dexterity, audial faculty, and visual acuity (aided or unaided) to perform required duties to include an acceptable weight for helicopter operations.
  • Must pass both pre-hire and random post-hire drug-screening exams.

 

 

Maybe as a medic, but a PA in this roll is $150k

people don't do jobs like this for the money, but for the experience. I have a friend who is an icu and ER nurse who is taking a 50% pay cut to fly. scene calls are cool, but the endless interfacility transfers get old( I did critical care transports for 3 years. that was enough). 

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8 hours ago, EMEDPA said:

people don't do jobs like this for the money, but for the experience. I have a friend who is an icu and ER nurse who is taking a 50% pay cut to fly. scene calls are cool, but the endless interfacility transfers get old( I did critical care transports for 3 years. that was enough). 

Problem with scene calls is vast majority of the time everything has been done by the time you get there.  Buddy's wife works for a major airmedical provider in the PNW, hasn't intubated in YEARS.  At least the IFTs have IABPs and a bunch of drips/arterial lines to play with.

A prepackaged trauma patient all wrapped up in the burrito blanket ain't much fun!

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Scene flights are a lot more interesting if on-scene EMS is BLS only.  I saw many more flight crew intubations 30+ years ago before the fire/ems agencies in my area had medics.  Now, there's a lot less reasons to fly a patient, because if you are under ~ 45 minutes drive time you can actually deliver the patient to the level I trauma centers faster by ground.

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20 hours ago, ventana said:

up to $110,000 for this?

Qualifications

  • State Licensure (DO, MD, PA-C, NP, EMT-P)
  • ACLS
  • PALS
  • Trauma Certification (PHTLS, ATLS, TNATC…)
  • NRP
  • Pass all entry testing
  • Must maintain all certifications without interruption for the duration of employment.
  • Must be able to lift 80lbs at a minimum of waist height. Additionally, must be able to walk, climb, stoop, crouch, kneel, balance, as well as demonstrate sufficient manual dexterity, audial faculty, and visual acuity (aided or unaided) to perform required duties to include an acceptable weight for helicopter operations.
  • Must pass both pre-hire and random post-hire drug-screening exams.

 

 

Maybe as a medic, but a PA in this roll is $150k

Yeah right, most flight medics make 50-70k tops.. 

 

Supply and demand, they know there is a line around the block of medics who want to fly

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On 3/14/2021 at 3:13 PM, EMEDPA said:

people don't do jobs like this for the money, but for the experience. I have a friend who is an icu and ER nurse who is taking a 50% pay cut to fly. scene calls are cool, but the endless interfacility transfers get old( I did critical care transports for 3 years. that was enough). 

Middle of the night in stormy weather flights on  USCG helos 150 miles across the Bearing Sea without a survival suit  losing radio contact will make one think twice about this kind of job. Nothing is darker or more humbling than the Bearing Sea at night in the winter during a storm with a critically ill or injured patient on your hands!

 

Edited by CAdamsPAC
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On 3/21/2021 at 12:49 AM, CAdamsPAC said:

Middle of the night in stormy weather flights on  USCG helos 150 miles across the Bearing Sea without a survival suit  losing radio contact will make one think twice about this kind of job. Nothing is darker or more humbling than the Bearing Sea at night in the winter during a storm with a critically ill or injured patient on your hands!

 

hats off

thank you for your service

 

A few times I got offered to do a TDY  to the Aleutian Islands (was in ANC/Elmendorf) I always turned it down, now I wish I had gone....

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57 minutes ago, ventana said:

hats off

thank you for your service

 

A few times I got offered to do a TDY  to the Aleutian Islands (was in ANC/Elmendorf) I always turned it down, now I wish I had gone....

I was a civilian PA working for a Native Alaskan Health Consortium and the USCG surgeon wouldn't approve the flight unless I went with the patient as the Corpsmen didn't have the skills needed for the patient's care.

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3 hours ago, CAdamsPAC said:

I was a civilian PA working for a Native Alaskan Health Consortium and the USCG surgeon wouldn't approve the flight unless I went with the patient as the Corpsmen didn't have the skills needed for the patient's care.

Last time I checked, in a USCG helo crew, the rescue swimmer was the EMT Basic.  I don't know what extra training they may have had, but I'm pretty sure they're not trained to the paramedic level.

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14 hours ago, rev ronin said:

Last time I checked, in a USCG helo crew, the rescue swimmer was the EMT Basic.  I don't know what extra training they may have had, but I'm pretty sure they're not trained to the paramedic level.

The USCG flight surgeon told me of the  cutter based corpsman he "wouldn't let that corpsman clip his toenails" so the HH-65 launched without him.

 

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I looked into this position about 18 months ago, and I had a good conversation with their ops director, but my friend who is a former Naval Aviator and now works for a Medevac company in Texas told me their safety culture was seriously lacking and discouraged me from moving forward in the process.

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  • 2 weeks later...

My hospital-based EMS has our medics on police helicopters; max pay is about $75K and you're not flying everyday; we do a lot of stuff besides wearing the jumpsuit. We always operate with two pilots (who happen to be cops). A local private big name hospital system also has flight medics and they are topping $100K. Long story short, the pay sucks for this gig as a PA.

Edited by TeddyRucpin
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