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Hi all, 

I'm a new grad starting out in ambulatory surgery-- I'm super excited because I love being hands on in the operating room. I was just wondering if any of the Surgical PAs could give some insights about ambulatory surgery? The site I'm going to be working at has 12 surgical subspecialities (list below). From what I gathered through the interview process, I'll be able to get experience in all of them. That being said I'm worried about being prepared and knowledgeable for cases. Anyone have any tips of how to study up, or even get more comfortable once starting? I have a little over a month before start date so any resources are welcome. Thanks in advance!

List of subspecialities/ topics to brush up on🤯🥴

 

Bariatric surgery

Breast surgery

Colorectal surgery

General surgery

Head and neck surgery

Minimally invasive gynecologic surgery

Neurosurgery

Ophthalmologic surgery

Orthopedic surgery

Pediatric surgery

Podiatric surgery

Sports medicine surgery

Urologic surgery

Vascular surgery

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Are you sure that you aren’t being hired to do pre-op assessments and post surgical evaluation prior to discharge?  From my understanding positions such as this don’t involve actual OR time but I’m sure that you would’ve had that clarified in the description for the position.  I would find it difficult to try to cover that many specialties spread across numerous picky surgeons and be successful.

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Hi thanks for the reply! Yes I asked in the interview, they said mostly in the operating room, and occasionally shifts in PACU. As for training its going to be at least 3 months with a week or two in different specialties-- learning both in the ambulatory center and main campus. I'm not sure if longterm I'll be rotating through all of these but I know the training will expose me to most or all. I'm a couple months out of school and feel like I already need to brush up on everything because of the combination of a 4 month research semester and 3 months to get credentialed, I already feel sooo far from clinical practice. Any resources or crash courses to help with a smoothish transition is appreciated!

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I see what you mean, but on my general surgery rotation the PAs would do bariatric, breast, colorectal, general, trauma and vascular surgery. I'm guessing it'll all be learning process, they were all more experienced but they did have a new grad on their team who double scrubbed and such to get the hang of things without slowing down the process. I think they mentioned there will be a total of 18 PAs doing staggered shifts so always someone to learn from in that sense. Plus I'm guessing the surgical techs/ circulating nurses will be a great resource to help with attending preferences

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