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I observed something today that caused me to stop and think. Sign makers were replacing a clinic sig nwith one for a laundromat and there is a story behind that.

This space is in a good location in the center of our town. About ten years ago, it came open when the previous optometrist office built a new building. I had been contemplating opening an urgent care clinic in our city and that space caught my eye. Our local medical groups had wait times for weeks and most did not offer same day service. We have a level III ED at the hospital that had a very low satisfaction score for minor ailments. So it seemed like a good niche. While I was in the midst of doing my ground work and research for my business plan, to my total surprise, a NP friend, who apparently had the same vision, opened an urgent care clinic in that space. I supported her in any way I could including giving her all the materials I had accumulated.

She started out doing as well as I had predicted. However, the hospital fought back. They quickly created their own urgent care clinic and expanded it to seven days per week 12, hours per day (which she could not do). Being part of the hospital they had stat labs, x-ray and the whole nine yards. They also operated it as a loss for several years with the intent of running her out of business. They succeeded after five years.

By the time she moved out, I had established my own headache clinic. I considered moving to her space (mine was better but more $$$) but I passed. I closed after five years as I grew tired of fighting with insurance companies. But a friend of mine, DO, and internist, who was very forward looking in his approach to medicine, took the space and started a very progressive clinic. It was integrated with dietary, exercise, and natural medicine. He had a heavy virtual medicine aspect, home visits, and many other patient-friendly perks. It was a concierge practice (cash and or membership) and we live on a very wealthy island with lots of millionaires (Paul Allen was one for a while). However, after four years, his clinic has bitten the dust and thus the laundromat is moving in.

I know in the year of COVID medical has become less rigid. However, it appears to me that there is a message about trying to adapt medical care into a patient-centered or atypical model. It is also a testament of the rough and tumble world of medical business. What do you think? 

 

 

 

Edited by jmj11
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Medicine has become a business, and an ugly one at that. Corporate entities may give lip service to caring about people, but we are are just lines on a spreadsheet, patients and providers alike. Aside from that, there is little concern if any of us are alive or dead. I guess we are no different than any other business. I just pity the young people coming in, thinking they are going to hang a shingle and save the world. Things don't work that way any more. 

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34 minutes ago, CJAadmission said:

Medicine has become a business, and an ugly one at that.

It's always been a business...it's just that profits and bottom lines weren't the key.  Since we allowed bean counters to take control who don't care that the numbers they look at are people (and I mean the patients...not the employees) we have been in an ugly business.

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hospitals, ACO, hospital organizations and insurance companies are sucking the life out of medicine

 

honestly I think a micro practice (small small small) that flies under the radar is the only way to go if you are going on your own

 

just a tiny 1-2 provider PCP (shortage everywhere so unlikely piss off the 800 lb gorillas ) and shoestring budget, just getting by....

 

I do see the ACO and hospital organizations failing at some point, history has a way for repeating itself

 

if they take away the facility fee, reimburse the hospital owned clinic the same as a private clinic, and stop the insurance fruad, upcoding, and money grabbing the hospitals do it will hurt them, while the doc's they have hired get tired of being ordered around by nobodies in the office, and migrate back towards private practice......

 

(that's my hopes anyways)

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On 1/21/2021 at 5:16 AM, mgriffiths said:

It's always been a business.

No, actually, go back far enough and it was a sacred calling.  But then the Christians got involved...

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13 minutes ago, rev ronin said:

No, actually, go back far enough and it was a sacred calling.  But then the Christians got involved...

and that darn Florence Nightingale....Nuns and nurses...that's why the NPs get all the jobs at the Catholic hospitals...😁

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41 minutes ago, EMEDPA said:

and that darn Florence Nightingale....Nuns and nurses...that's why the NPs get all the jobs at the Catholic hospitals...😁

EMEDPA, I love your posts.  I think I could listen to you read the phone book and be entertained.  I appreciate your insight on the boards here.  Thanks.

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14 minutes ago, Cideous said:

EMEDPA, I love your posts.  I think I could listen to you read the phone book and be entertained.  I appreciate your insight on the boards here.  Thanks.

Thanks!

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