Jump to content

Advice for PA returning to practice after 5 years


Recommended Posts

Hi everyone, 

I am a PA who is planning to return to practice after 5 years as a stay at home mom. I practiced for two years prior to becoming a stay at home mom. 

I am planning to return to work in the next 6 months and I want some advice on this. I feel very far removed from medicine and would like to review EVERYTHING. What is a good app or book or plan to basically refresh from all of PA school? I only practiced for two years so I have lost a lot of the information I learned and practiced and want to basically start from scratch and get myself where I need to be.

Any advice????

Link to post
Share on other sites

The job market for PA's can be weird in some areas, so it might not be the easiest time to find a job.  A residency could be a good idea.  Make sure your BLS and ACLS and up to date.  Have good references to vouch for you and do whatever networking you can.  Pance Prep Pearls is a good book for an overview of what you may need to know.  Maybe volunteer for your state's COVID response needs as a way to get back into working.  5 years out after only 2 years of practicing seems like something that would cause employers to pause when looking at your resume, so I think you will need to do whatever you can to pad your resume to show that you are planning to be back in the workforce for good.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would try a formal PANCE/PANRE prep course or a boot camp.  I think a self study app/book wouldn't be the best route to go.  Have you already looked into getting relicensed having not practiced for 5 years?  It is a tough market out there now and I'm guessing you will meet many hurdles trying to get into a good job.  Good luck to you!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually have a Family Practice doc that is looking into hiring me. He is thinking I can start around June or July given I go through the formal interview process and go through credentialing. He is willing to train, but I want to be prepared for this opportunity or another one that may come. 

 

I actually still have the PANCE pearls book and can look into a bootcamp as well. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree with above. Really also depends on the field. I would also seriously try to volunteer 2-4 days a month at a free clinic or church based clinic. You need to get comfortable talking with patients and doing exams again. This would also give you the opportunity to network with other local providers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a new PA having just started in primary care. I think more useful that pance prep would be really focusing on some core issues that you are definitely going to experience, likely your first day back. These include diabetes (alot of new meds and guidelines), HTN, obesity, osteoarthritis, low back pain, CHF, CKD (stages and common medications that are contraindicated if GFR below 60), CAD (there are several meds with proven mortality benefit), obesity... again. Also review guidelines for work up of thyroid nodules, lung nodules, adrenal incidentalomas etc. Review the basic lab work ups and differentials for dizziness, fatigue and weakness. Know ENT differentials and treatments for ear pain, headache (primary vs secondary), tinnitus, allergies, sinus complaints etc. Also know all the A (and B?) screening recommendations from the USPSTF and just expand from there. That's the stuff I can think of off the top of my head, and the advice I would want if I were you. cme.aapa.org has a lot of free CME that is pretty good. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you so much for the breakdown on topics I should focus on!! I think more focused study may be the way to go right now. So many courses and bootcamps are geared more towards passing the boards and not actual clinical practice. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, if I was a stay-at-home parent with dependents, I would consider any option that pays rather than volunteering my valuable time (unless money ain't a thang). Each hour needs to be accounted for as a parent of young kids. Sure you've been out of practice for a while, but you've still exhibited baseline knowledge within a certain timeframe. 

I don't know what your area of practice was prior to your leave, but seems like you have a lead. Otherwise, life experiences are relevant to clinical knowledge so maybe pediatrics? 

I strongly recommend uptodate, if you can swing the price of subscription, in a slow-paced setting like primary care. Medscape is fine, too. I wouldn't recommend a fast paced setting like urgent care, ICU, EM, unless you're guaranteed hand-holding. If you have time to spare, PANCE prep courses or books will be beneficial, but they're really manufactured to help you pass a standardized exam.

I'd also like to recommend wikem.org in an acute care setting. 

Source: EM PA, parent to an old toddler and a 6 month old

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Moderator
On 1/13/2021 at 12:55 AM, wookie said:

 

I strongly recommend uptodate, if you can swing the price of subscription, in a slow-paced setting like primary care.

Source: EM PA, parent to an old toddler and a 6 month old

oh my oh me

unsure what your perception of Primary care is, or comes from, but nope it is not slow-paced......

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/13/2021 at 12:55 AM, wookie said:

Personally, if I was a stay-at-home parent with dependents, I would consider any option that pays rather than volunteering my valuable time (unless money ain't a thang).

I so agree. As long as your license is in good standing, why volunteer? You are a (licensed?) professional. Go be one. I'd go with the FP offer - what a great way to re-immerse yourself with low(er) acuity.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kittryn said:

I so agree. As long as your license is in good standing, why volunteer? You are a (licensed?) professional. Go be one. I'd go with the FP offer - what a great way to re-immerse yourself with low(er) acuity.

Have you noticed that 1/3 of the threads in the last 6 months are complaining of how tough the job market is?. With a 5 year employment gap, this seems like a pretty reasonable way to make some connections. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More