Jump to content

Best Jobs/Fastest to get trained in for PCE


Recommended Posts

Hey all,

I was wondering if anyone had opinions on what some good jobs for acquire PCE are, versus some that might be considered less applicable.

I’ve heard some pros and cons for each, the big two jobs I’ve seen seem to be CNA or Medical Assistant.

What roles have you used/heard that are relatively simple to train for but provide the nose desirable PCE?

Thanks!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I may be biased because this is what I did, but I would recommend seeing if any hospitals near you provide paid training to be a Patient Care Technician (PCT) (or something similar.) I work for a large hospital system, and they have a quick yet robust training program for PCTs with no medical experience. I spent roughly a week doing classroom and general skills training (all paid), then about 4 weeks of on-the-job training (still paid) with experienced PCTs while learning my unit's specific practices.

I went this route because I did not want to spend additional time and money getting a certification for a job I was only expecting to have for 1.5-2 years. Unless you feel very strongly about being an EMT, I don't think it's necessary to pay for training you will use for a relatively short period of time. It can be incredibly difficult and stressful working inpatient, but I think this intense hands-on experience is part of the reason I got into PA school my first application cycle. Two people I used to work with also got into PA school the first time they applied. Again, I am biased, but I think this kind of training is more valuable than less hands-on work. Don't be afraid to get up close and personal with patients. It honestly irks me when I see posts from other pre-PAs who seem to do everything they can to try to avoid actual contact with patients for their PCE... It reminds me of some of the medical residents I see who almost seem afraid to deal with patients more than absolutely necessary... Obviously I will not be taking care of patient ADLs, drawing blood, etc. as a PA, but I have learned so much about how different people interact with the medical system, what behaviors exemplify good providers, how crucial nurses are, as well as passively learning about various illnesses, treatments, medications, etc. It also just helps to get a sense for what is normal in a medical environment.

I would be very surprised if you had a hard time finding a healthcare job like that right now, as I know many hospitals are struggling with staffing. However, you should be prepared to possibly care for COVID patients, as it is somewhat unavoidable in healthcare right now...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Though some schools don't accept it, scribing is by far the quickest and cheapest way to start getting those hours. The pay will suck (at least if you are with ScribeAmerica) but the experience is second to none and it's in my opinion the best exposure to medicine that you can possible get. It baffles me why some programs don't accept scribes. Scribes definitely have the upper hand once we get to clinicals. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

SCRIBING with a caveat. 

All my PCE was as a medical scribe and I got 8 acceptances (including Duke).

Like Laura said, the pay is around 12-15, but the experience gained is second to none. 

 

The Caveat- Some schools count it as HCE, so if you are planning on applying to specific programs, double check. About 10 out of the 100+ I looked at did not accept it. Below are a few. 

 

Mercer,  Pitt, Univ ND, Albany Med, Arcadia (don't like), Carrol, FSU, and MEDEX (Seattle)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Would go the PCT/ER tech route for faster entry. You'll get greater exposure to hands-on care and management.

I would argue against scribing for PA school, as I think it's a better option for someone looking into med school. Scribes will be able to better navigate EMRs while in clinical phase and have more practice with drafting notes, but generally speaking they're not evaluating/interviewing patients and getting the hands-on experience that is actually what sets students apart during clinicals.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More