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If you are in first tier of Covid Immunization, will you take it as soon as it is made available or are you considering waitin for a few month's?


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Ill be first in line. I put a lot worse experimental things in my body in the 70"s. This is why I can't run for president.

After hours I volunteer in my local community to include the local volunteer Fire and Rescue Service. Two weeks ago the Fire Chief forwarded me a letter from the Iowa Department of Health about the pe

I'm going to let all y'all test it out before I give it a try.  Someone has to take care of you when you all get MS/autism/Guillain-Barre.   😜

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Update.  

 

Got it a little after I made my first post.

I actually felt like crap after it, mild fever (100.6), body aches, and neck pain. Symptoms started the next day and lasted about 24 hours. I woke up the second day and felt normal...went for my usual morning run without issues.

I would actually consider this the type of reaction people would have with the second shot. I had COVID  in October, didn't require hospitalization but felt pretty horrible. I am hoping the second shot for me with be nothing more than a sore arm.

Edited by Will352ns
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Still waiting for my position in the food chain.

ICU, Urgent Care and long term care are all first.

We are supposed to get more info this week.

They are rotating the number of people per dept so if there are side effects - one dept won't be decimated if folks can't work a shift. 

So, I am waiting..............................

Spouse works for school district - ZERO communication from them about vaccinating staff.......

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I just finished my second hospitalization for Covid yesterday. I now have four antivirals under my belt but received the following yesterday from a close PA friend in Houston, Tom Rosselle.

cleardot.gif
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HOW TO FIGHT COVID AT HOME
No one ever talks about how to fight Covid at home. I came down with Covid in November. I went to the hospital, running a fever of 103, a rapid heart beat, and other common symptoms that come with Covid. While I was there they treated me for the high fever, dehydration and pneumonia.
The doctor sent me home to fight Covid with two prescriptions - Azithromycin 250mg & Dexamethason 6mg. When the nurse came in to discharge me, I asked her, "What can I do to help fight this at home?" She said, “Sleep on your stomach at all times with Covid. If you can’t sleep on your stomach because of heath issues sleep on your side. Do not lay on your back no matter what because it smashes your lungs and that will allow fluid to set in.
Set your clock every two hours while sleeping on your stomach, then get out of bed and walk for 15-30 min, no matter how tired or weak that you are. Also move your arms around frequently, it helps to open your lungs. Breathe in thru your nose, and out thru your mouth. This will help build up your lungs, plus help get rid of the Pneumonia or other fluid you may have.
When sitting in a recliner, sit up straight - do not lay back in the recliner, again this will smash your lungs. While watching TV - get up and walk during every commercial.
Eat at least 1 - 2 eggs a day, plus bananas, avocado and asparagus.These are good for Potassium. Drink Pedialyte, Gatorade Zero, Powerade Zero & Water with Electrolytes to prevent you from becoming dehydrated. Do not drink anything cold - have it at room temperature or warm it up. Water with lemon, and little honey, peppermint tea, apple cider are good suggestions for getting in fluids. No milk products, or pork. Vitamin’s D3, C, B, Zinc, Probiotic One-Day are good ideas. Tylenol for fever. Mucinex, or Mucinex DM for drainage, plus helps the cough. Pepcid helps for cramps in your legs. One baby aspirin everyday can help prevent getting a blood clot, which can occur from low activity. "
Drink a smoothie of blueberries, strawberries, bananas, honey, tea and a spoon or two of peanut butter.
We always hear of how Covid takes lives, but there isn't a lot of information out there regarding how to fight Covid. I hope this helps you or someone you know, just as it has helped me.
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On 12/31/2020 at 3:26 AM, surgblumm said:

I just finished my second hospitalization for Covid yesterday. I now have four antivirals under my belt but received the following yesterday from a close PA friend in Houston, Tom Rosselle.

cleardot.gif
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
HOW TO FIGHT COVID AT HOME
No one ever talks about how to fight Covid at home. I came down with Covid in November. I went to the hospital, running a fever of 103, a rapid heart beat, and other common symptoms that come with Covid. While I was there they treated me for the high fever, dehydration and pneumonia.
The doctor sent me home to fight Covid with two prescriptions - Azithromycin 250mg & Dexamethason 6mg. When the nurse came in to discharge me, I asked her, "What can I do to help fight this at home?" She said, “Sleep on your stomach at all times with Covid. If you can’t sleep on your stomach because of heath issues sleep on your side. Do not lay on your back no matter what because it smashes your lungs and that will allow fluid to set in.
Set your clock every two hours while sleeping on your stomach, then get out of bed and walk for 15-30 min, no matter how tired or weak that you are. Also move your arms around frequently, it helps to open your lungs. Breathe in thru your nose, and out thru your mouth. This will help build up your lungs, plus help get rid of the Pneumonia or other fluid you may have.
When sitting in a recliner, sit up straight - do not lay back in the recliner, again this will smash your lungs. While watching TV - get up and walk during every commercial.
Eat at least 1 - 2 eggs a day, plus bananas, avocado and asparagus.These are good for Potassium. Drink Pedialyte, Gatorade Zero, Powerade Zero & Water with Electrolytes to prevent you from becoming dehydrated. Do not drink anything cold - have it at room temperature or warm it up. Water with lemon, and little honey, peppermint tea, apple cider are good suggestions for getting in fluids. No milk products, or pork. Vitamin’s D3, C, B, Zinc, Probiotic One-Day are good ideas. Tylenol for fever. Mucinex, or Mucinex DM for drainage, plus helps the cough. Pepcid helps for cramps in your legs. One baby aspirin everyday can help prevent getting a blood clot, which can occur from low activity. "
Drink a smoothie of blueberries, strawberries, bananas, honey, tea and a spoon or two of peanut butter.
We always hear of how Covid takes lives, but there isn't a lot of information out there regarding how to fight Covid. I hope this helps you or someone you know, just as it has helped me.

this advice has another thread running and in short it is not medically sound advice, should not be followed

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1 hour ago, Matthewtanner said:

If I’m in the low risk demographic, and still have to wear a mask as a provider, is it better to let higher risk individuals get it? Just curious on the opine.

Commendable that you're wanting to put others before yourself, but if you get covid and you're out two weeks or more, you're putting your coworkers in a real bind. Plus, think of all the patients that are counting on you too. And your loved ones. Accepting your spot at the front of the line isn't selfish. It's putting on an extra piece of armor for battle. The world needs more people like you, willing to put others over self, but IMHO take your turn when it comes. 

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4 hours ago, Matthewtanner said:

Why? The data seems conflicting on if you can still transmit with the vaccine so I should still wear a mask for transmission sake. Not saying wrong or right. But it just seems if they had 10 vaccines available that day, it’d make more sense for people who could die to get it, versus me who might would be out for 2 weeks...or asymptotic . It’s not unfathomable to be in a line to get a vaccine, and as they get to me, it’s their last one available for the day, and there are people behind me waiting to get it. 
Maybe a blanket policy isn’t best, because certainly every region isn’t limited by medical professionals, and certainly some places could afford to have providers out for 2 weeks, and that would make more vaccines available to high burden areas. And certainly there are healthy low risk people who ended up getting the vaccine because they knew the right people or right place right time who aren’t healthcare providers or high risk. Idk, just conversating is all.

I think my counter argument is there is no promise that your vaccine will go to someone who needs it more. You have an important place in the food chain and, when the fickle wheel of fortune called "the system", says it's your turn... go get the vaccine. The distribution is far from perfect but it  is the system we have. You have noble ideals but they may not actually play out in reality.

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Now, having had COVID-19 and surviving, I am eager to get my vaccination in the next month when they call my age group. My doctor said that I can take it thirty days post illness and that my present status does not provide me immunity from re-infection. Too many people are to eager to decide on limited information that having been infected means that you can do indoor dining and forget about social distance because you possess immunity. Some people have antibodies and others don not therefore I am protecting the public and my family by being a good citizen and following the rules.

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5 hours ago, Matthewtanner said:

Why? The data seems conflicting on if you can still transmit with the vaccine so I should still wear a mask for transmission sake. Not saying wrong or right. But it just seems if they had 10 vaccines available that day, it’d make more sense for people who could die to get it, versus me who might would be out for 2 weeks...or asymptotic . It’s not unfathomable to be in a line to get a vaccine, and as they get to me, it’s their last one available for the day, and there are people behind me waiting to get it. 
Maybe a blanket policy isn’t best, because certainly every region isn’t limited by medical professionals, and certainly some places could afford to have providers out for 2 weeks, and that would make more vaccines available to high burden areas. And certainly there are healthy low risk people who ended up getting the vaccine because they knew the right people or right place right time who aren’t healthcare providers or high risk. Idk, just conversating is all.

To my knowledge the data isn't conflicting, it's non-existent as nobody tested the trial participants. We do know that masks aren't failsafe, so in my mind better to have a double source of protection for others than one. 

To use a crude analogy, if you are avoiding getting pregnant would you want to use to pull out method alone or that plus birth control? (This analogy is brought to you by my irritation at my kids health teacher who implied the POM as being a viable option)

I have no personal investment in your receiving the vaccine because as a provider it's not just for you, it's for your patients. Just because a practice could MAYBE manage without a single provider for two weeks what about everyone you exposed?

And I can tell you right now that if my mom was one of your patients and contracted it from you when you had the opportunity to receive the vaccine... I'd be pretty unhappy.

While the data isn't there regarding contracting and spreading it's our best chance at the moment.

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1 hour ago, surgblumm said:

Now, having had COVID-19 and surviving, I am eager to get my vaccination in the next month when they call my age group. My doctor said that I can take it thirty days post illness and that my present status does not provide me immunity from re-infection. Too many people are to eager to decide on limited information that having been infected means that you can do indoor dining and forget about social distance because you possess immunity. Some people have antibodies and others don not therefore I am protecting the public and my family by being a good citizen and following the rules.

I am so glad you are doing ok!

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I got my second dose the 0930 on 1/6, it's 0450 on 1/7 and I'm huddled in my office feeling like I got beat with a fairly large stick. Alternating APAP and ibuprofen. Probably running enough of a fever that they wouldn't let me back in if I left now.

With that being said...science is absolutely amazing, what a historic time to be alive. Just wouldn't recommend timing your 2nd dose on day 1 of 4 🙄

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first dose phizer 2 days ago

sore arm (person giving it gave it WAY high in deltoid - almost an AC injection!) but it is in

low grade heada ache started about 5 hours after - lasted about 1.5 days

nothing bad

IBU helps

 

Shot #2 is gonna suck.... but well worth it and getting it!

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I got my first Pfizer dose yesterday. All I have is a very slight sore arm today. One of my MAs is out today with fever and body aches after getting hers yesterday. 

I agree the roll out is very uncoordinated in my neck of the woods.  The Nurse giving me my dose said that she had to turn people away because they did not have proof that they should be in phase one. She then had to throw a partial bottle away because there was no one to give it to.  

It's interesting what England is doing.  They are stretching out the vaccination schedule to be able to give the first dose to more people. 

Edited by wilso2ar
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Sorry that you guys have had a slightly negative situation involving your immunization. It's slightly because it is you and not me, yet we trust that the final result will be better than possible death. Hang in there guys.

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1 hour ago, TheFatMan said:

S/p first dose of Moderna about 8 hours. Feel totally fine so far. 5G reception has been great too, incidentally.

My cell phone is up to 10 bars and my third eye has completely opened. Can't wait for dose 2

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28 minutes ago, Febrifuge said:

Got my first dose of Pfizer 7 hours ago. Feel absolutely fine. The injection didn’t hurt, and the deltoid is no more sore than with a flu shot. We’ll see how the rowing machine likes me tomorrow morning I guess. 

You got the placebo 😉

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Had my 2nd dose on 1/5 around noon...felt fine until I woke up at 0700 for work the next day. Felt like I was hit by a train; fatigue, body aches, muscle aches, and struggled with staying focus. Thank god I was in UC and not the ER because I wouldn't have been able to keep up. No fever though.  No Tylenol or ibuprofen...just vodka.

Felt 100% better the next day...that was rough to say the least but covid vax symptoms > actual covid lol. 10/10 would do it again.

Edited by Diggy
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My 90 y/o mom got her first on Wednesday, called yesterday asking me to bring her her purse and house keys (she resides in a care facility), mentioned that she had visited with her siblings the day before (all deceased for years), and didn’t recall getting her vaccine but said that nothing hurt.  Confirmed this morning that she had actually gotten it.  I’m still waiting back in the COVID caboose.  At least they bring water/bread back to me here as I wait with the masses.

Edited by GetMeOuttaThisMess
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30 minutes ago, FiremedicMike said:

Welp.. 

 

1 week after getting the vaccine, I got covid.. First 3 days were really rough, feeling mostly OK now... like a bad head cold..

Almost made it through this untouched.

 

 

 

Damn!  Hopefully the shot helped with your immune response?  We still don't really know that it "prevents" infection, but 95% that it prevents severe infection/symptoms?

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