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Drop in flu deaths?

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1 hour ago, CJAdmission said:

Makes you wonder if we are doing something iatrogenic to cause it. What's the "typical" course of treatment you are using?

I dont think so.  I think it is the natural course of the disease.  I see the same thing in the ED with people presenting mild/moderately I'll, send them home and they get better, then decompensate a week or so later.

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1 hour ago, Boatswain2PA said:

I dont think so.  I think it is the natural course of the disease.  I see the same thing in the ED with people presenting mild/moderately I'll, send them home and they get better, then decompensate a week or so later.

That's exactly what I'm seeing in the ED: mild dyspnea, slight hypoxia fixed by 2 lpm O2 via NC.  But, elevated d-dimers with  significant PE's, troponin bumps with NSTEMI's in folks without cardiac hx, new a-fib with RVR, all after being mildly ill for 5-10 days.  Pretty much all of these folks are getting the full cardiac w/u and PE studies before I d/c, admit, or transfer.

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8 hours ago, Boatswain2PA said:

I dont think so.  I think it is the natural course of the disease.  I see the same thing in the ED with people presenting mild/moderately I'll, send them home and they get better, then decompensate a week or so later.

I agree. It's just the way things shake out, they were going to end up that way regardless, it just takes time to evolve. Have a multigenerational family at the moment, minus one of the younger generation as of yesterday.

6 hours ago, ohiovolffemtp said:

That's exactly what I'm seeing in the ED: mild dyspnea, slight hypoxia fixed by 2 lpm O2 via NC.  But, elevated d-dimers with  significant PE's, troponin bumps with NSTEMI's in folks without cardiac hx, new a-fib with RVR, all after being mildly ill for 5-10 days.  Pretty much all of these folks are getting the full cardiac w/u and PE studies before I d/c, admit, or transfer.

Had a code neuro come in, found down, obtunded, CTH neg, no response to narcan. CTA with clean PAs but obvious aspiration and GGOs throughout...and a positive COVID. More importantly also a +COVID in August. 

Oh yeah. Also the below 12 lead. Now what's the cause here...was this a primary cardiac event? Re-infection with COVID leading to hypercoaguable state and subsequent in-stent thrombosis? (Able to just balloon the occlusion)

We should go back to doing cases...

IMG_20201028_055055_01.jpg

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On 10/26/2020 at 11:12 AM, Boatswain2PA said:

https://www.foxnews.com/health/drop-flu-deaths-indicate-most-at-risk-died-coronavirus

I think it's way to early to know for sure, and I think this is a poorly written article ("NY/NYC has had zero flu deaths, which is also the average of the 5 week average"...what?)

US usually has had 17 flu deaths per week by Oct 17, yet we had none this year. If that early trends keeps up then it is good news.

The UK lost 1132 from flu and pneumonia last month, down from the 1500 average.  Again, if this early trend keeps up then it is good news (although again poorly written article as it lists "flu and pna deaths", and the 1500 average doesn't specify if that is the annual average, or the average for September).

Maybe the masks/social distancing is helping.

Maybe SARS-Cov-19 has culled the herd.

Maybe it's just a statistical anomaly.

 

On 10/26/2020 at 11:12 AM, Boatswain2PA said:

https://www.foxnews.com/health/drop-flu-deaths-indicate-most-at-risk-died-coronavirus

I think it's way to early to know for sure, and I think this is a poorly written article ("NY/NYC has had zero flu deaths, which is also the average of the 5 week average"...what?)

US usually has had 17 flu deaths per week by Oct 17, yet we had none this year. If that early trends keeps up then it is good news.

The UK lost 1132 from flu and pneumonia last month, down from the 1500 average.  Again, if this early trend keeps up then it is good news (although again poorly written article as it lists "flu and pna deaths", and the 1500 average doesn't specify if that is the annual average, or the average for September).

Maybe the masks/social distancing is helping.

Maybe SARS-Cov-19 has culled the herd.

Maybe it's just a statistical anomaly.

Hopefully the flu deaths remain low. I am not sure if providers are doing flu and covid swabbing. I know at our clinics most providers do a covid swab and not a flu as most people do not want to swabs up their nose. 

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On 10/26/2020 at 1:40 PM, Boatswain2PA said:

But childhood viral infections have very low morbidity or mortality.  Not sure it's worth the economic damage to their future.

I think he was making a comment about this as it does prove that masking and social distancing works (to a point) but also if we never get around other we won't have a healthy, robust immune system cause it never gets "used."  There is a healthy balance of the two (being exposed to viruses etc and protecting us from deadly viruses as a whole). For Covid most people < 70 will be fine compared to most other viruses. I agree with NOT hurting out economy, children's schooling, socializing, mental health etc, but we must maintain open and we can do that in a smart safe manner.  

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