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Decisions, decisions, work or wait?


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This may be an ultimately personal decision but I wanted some feedback. Sorry if it’s long.
 

Currently my mother is undergoing aggressive chemo. She has her “on” week and then two weeks “off”. She has a few months left of her treatment and I currently live with her so Im taking her to appointments and helping her with what she needs. Although she is younger and doesn’t need a ton of care. 

She was diagnosed just months ago and it has obviously been a whirlwind with this and COVID. I previously was planning to be working full time by now and get PCE hours to apply next application year as I currently have 0 hours. I was planning to take O-Chem this fall and I’ve been studying for the GRE for about a month. 
 

The only part-time jobs I’ve been able to find are physical therapy aide jobs in private non-inpatient places (of which I have an interview next week) but I’m the least stoked on PT aide. Maybe someone with that experience could make the case for it? I’m an introvert who loves people but I’m not an athletic, comfortable in a sports environment type. I do love one on one connections though and am not overly shy. 
 

I have shadowed in multiple health clinics, I just don’t care much for PT! But I know it’s stepping stone. 

I feel like if I got into this part time job I’d probably would want to in a few months if things settle down with my mom to move to full time in another job. Is it worth it to take on a part time job to at least get some hours started for just a few months or just wait it out and worry about the other things in my life first?

 

Of course the extra worry of potential patient contact meaning advanced exposure which I would bring home to my mom. 

For context I plan to apply to many schools with only recommended patient care or very low requirements and I have a 4.0 post bacc in pre-reqs and 3.73 of my first degree in economics. 
 

thank you! 

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If it was me, and it’s not, take care of your Mom and don’t put her at risk. Hopefully her treatment will turn out well but, either way, I suspect you’ll feel better about having been there for her.

 

Consider taking some on-line classes which are even more plentiful these days.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Thank you both!! It’s hard when the middle of so many things let alone all this and a pandemic to know what the “right” thing is, but it’s true things can wait and should focus on my moms health. PA school should understand out of everything - and if not there is always the following year.

Ill look into CNA too, thank you!!

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  • 2 months later...

I just checked the date you posted and I guess it’s kind of old. 
firstly, I hope you’re Mom is ok and gets better very soon. 
secondly, how did you make out on your decision? I would have suggested to limit the potential exposure to covid for the time period your mom’s immunity would be compromised (ideally if you had the time)  Start up again when she’s back to her normal. 

Edited by Gr8ce
Grammar
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Thank you for the kind words! I did end up holding off on PCE - and it was worth it. There was a great deal of unexpected things that came up and I was glad I was able to be 100% there for my mom. I don't think some hours built up for a part-time job would have personally been worth the stress, I couldn't imagine possibly bringing home COVID. She has her last main chemo coming up and is doing well so far. I am planning to move out into my own studio this week actually - and I have an interview for a PCE position. I still will be able to likely get 1,000 hours before applying. I am also going to focus on schools with less PCE requirements.

I haven't applied or gotten into PA school of course, but I think there is a great deal of pressure to do all the right things all the time, but really I would hope a PA school would understand that sometimes life doesn't work like that. I think I'd be able to explain too on the COVID essay part as well? Thanks for checking in.

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1 hour ago, Elsebond said:

Thank you for the kind words! I did end up holding off on PCE - and it was worth it. There was a great deal of unexpected things that came up and I was glad I was able to be 100% there for my mom. I don't think some hours built up for a part-time job would have personally been worth the stress, I couldn't imagine possibly bringing home COVID. She has her last main chemo coming up and is doing well so far. I am planning to move out into my own studio this week actually - and I have an interview for a PCE position. I still will be able to likely get 1,000 hours before applying. I am also going to focus on schools with less PCE requirements.

I haven't applied or gotten into PA school of course, but I think there is a great deal of pressure to do all the right things all the time, but really I would hope a PA school would understand that sometimes life doesn't work like that. I think I'd be able to explain too on the COVID essay part as well? Thanks for checking in.

Well done! You will always remember being there for your Mom when it counted. I admire your character. 

Best of luck,

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