Jump to content

Interdisciplinary learning?

Recommended Posts

I'm applying this cycle and I see that many schools boast about the fact that their PAs have their own resources, labs, and classes while others advertise their interdisciplinary model in which resources and education are combined with other health profession students. It seems like schools in both camps use their model as a point of pride, and I'm sure it has a strong influence on the learning experience. However, I'm not sure how much consideration to give this when deciding schools to apply to, or if I can even form an opinion of my own without having experienced either firsthand.

I'm wondering if there are current PA students here to can share their experience. What model does your school use? How many interdisciplinary opportunities do you have (i.e. complete program immersion, or just a few seminars or service activities here and there with other programs)? What do you like and dislike about it? I know you can't compare without having done both, but do you wish you had more or less integration? Did you take this into consideration when researching schools?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True interdisciplinary learning is a good thing because shows you the scope and skills of other disciplines so you can work better together.

If instead it comes from an underlying shortage of academic resources, forces you to share scarce resources with others, and doesn’t give you the attention and time to learn your own discipline, then it can shortchange your education.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/29/2020 at 2:20 PM, UGoLong said:

True interdisciplinary learning is a good thing because shows you the scope and skills of other disciplines so you can work better together.

If instead it comes from an underlying shortage of academic resources, forces you to share scarce resources with others, and doesn’t give you the attention and time to learn your own discipline, then it can shortchange your education.
 

That's really helpful insight, thank you! Do you know how to tell whether it's strategic or due to resource scarcity? I.e. red flags, things to look for on the website, questions to ask during an interview, etc?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would soft-pedal this in formal interviews and discuss it in more detail with current students that you get to informally visit with during the interview process (since generally they have no input into the school's evaluation of you). By soft-pedal, I'm suggesting that you don't be too investigative and instead just ask questions that aren't asking the interviewer to defend the program's approach.

During the interviews, you could ask what other disciplines would be in which courses with you. While meeting with existing students, you could ask how the school balances the different needs of the disciplines in the classes and how the PA students feel about it. In fact, asking existing students what they like and don't like about their program can give you a fair amount of insight. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, drizzled said:

That's really helpful insight, thank you! Do you know how to tell whether it's strategic or due to resource scarcity? I.e. red flags, things to look for on the website, questions to ask during an interview, etc?

Thanks!

Red flags are a PANCE pass rate less than 90%, if you have to find any of your own required rotations, and any problems with accreditation. A personal red flag is any program that doesn't also have a medical school; but that is much more subjective.

Other than that, UGoLong is on point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Red flags are a PANCE pass rate less than 90%, if you have to find any of your own required rotations, and any problems with accreditation. A personal red flag is any program that doesn't also have a medical school; but that is much more subjective.
Other than that, UGoLong is on point.
Lots of excellent PA programs aren't associated with medical (MD or DO) schools and, at least when I interviewed, not all that were so affiliated were excellent.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More