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Does It Matter What Master's Degree You Have?


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I will be starting PA school in August and will be getting a bachelor's degree. I would like to get my Master's degree in the future and keep seeing little rumors of PA's needing Master's in the future. Either way I think it's a good thing to have one just to be competitive. My question is, does it really matter what the Master's degree is in? Is it better to have a Master's in PA Studies or can I get it in Health Administration or Business etc?

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Guest hubbardtim48

I would say no because there are several different masters degrees that PA schools use and form what I have heard employers care less what it is in, I think it is just more that you have it (some states require a specific masters) and please correct me if I am wrong, but the state I live in (MO) requires a masters from a PA school and not from a different university. So, basically you would have to go to a masters PA program to work in the state of MO. I am sure the state does not care what type of masters it is because the two PA schools in MO offer two different master degrees (MMS & MSPAS). For your question, I would look at schools around where you live or if you would like a masters in health science, a good accelerated online program is thru Saint Francis University. I got my MHSc from there and loved it! So, check it out and good luck!

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There are multiple posts on this subject if you do a little searching. Basically, it doesn't matter unless you are practicing in a state that requires a specific master's. Ohio for instance requires a master's in a field of "clinical relevance" to obtain prescriptive authority. So, an MBA would not meet this requirement.

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