Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello all,

I know there is a pre-PA section on this thread but I felt that this would be a better place to ask this question.

I would appreciate any advice from those who has experience in school admissions. 

I am a practicing pharmacist who wants to become a PA. Just finished CASPA and was verified. The school I want to apply to states that applicants must achieve minimum of 3.0 overall gpa based on CASPA. My overall CASPA gpa turned out to be 2.9. I think this is because they are including all my classes such as a bunch of retakes in undergrad and pharmacy school classes (Most people in pharmacy school didn't care about grades since we just needed to pass unless you were a gunner. Had I known that my pharmacy school gpa will affect my life later on, I would've totally tried harder to get better grades haha). My grad school gpa (I have a MS in neuroscience) is 3.5, post-bacc, which include most of pre-reqs for PA school, gpa is 4.0. Based on this info, will the school even look at my application? 

The reason I applied to one school is because I already have a family and do not wish to leave where I live. I am debating if I need to be applying to other schools before it is too late. Thank you in advance. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My best guess....if 3.0 is the minimum gpa needed then your application will be weeded out for not meeting the minimum.  I would reach directly out to the program director.  If nothing more, it could at least get your name on his/her desk to perhaps look at your application.  I would guess they couldn't consider you regardless or it would go against their published admission criteria.  Unless maybe they have a clause where the program director can make exceptions.  I would apply to more then one program.  Back in my day I applied to 2 programs.  Nowadays, students apply to like 10-20 schools in hopes to just get into one.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, DizzyJ said:

My best guess....if 3.0 is the minimum gpa needed then your application will be weeded out for not meeting the minimum.  I would reach directly out to the program director.  If nothing more, it could at least get your name on his/her desk to perhaps look at your application.  I would guess they couldn't consider you regardless or it would go against their published admission criteria.  Unless maybe they have a clause where the program director can make exceptions.  I would apply to more then one program.  Back in my day I applied to 2 programs.  Nowadays, students apply to like 10-20 schools in hopes to just get into one.

I may have misunderstood. There is no set gpa it looks like but it does state "Applicants must achieve a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 as calculated by CASPA" Not sure if this would be considered a requirement or just a guideline to encourage students with higher gpa to apply. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Frankly, no, you'll likely get automatically filtered out.  

No need to make exceptions for folks when each program has MULTIPLE applicants per available seat.

This would have been perfect in the pre-PA forum.  Post where the topic is relevant, not based on who you want to reply.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Moderator
5 hours ago, MT2PA said:

Frankly, no, you'll likely get automatically filtered out.  

No need to make exceptions for folks when each program has MULTIPLE applicants per available seat.

This would have been perfect in the pre-PA forum.  Post where the topic is relevant, not based on who you want to reply.

Agreed

Have moved to the appropriate forum

Link to post
Share on other sites

One question.....Is the calculated GPA with the Masters degree or just undergrad?

If Masters degree grades are there, then I would move on.  They will not look beyond that.

If 2.9 CASPA calculated only with undergrad, there may be hope.

Reading this it appears its with the masters degree - If so, I'd move on....

 

Sorry but truthful...

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well turns out CASPA calculates gps unfairly. 

If a school has numeric grading system then CASPA converts in into letter grades without +/-. Even though my other schools have letter grades with +/-, my pharmacy school has numeric grades on transcripts and CASPA gpa scale totally screwed up the overall gap. i.e. if you have 88 for a class which should be considered B+ or 3.5ish, CASPA converts it to B or 3.0. 

Thankfully I was able to get a conversion chart from the pharmacy school and sent that to CASPA explaining how they need to recalculate my gpa. Based on my calculation, my overall gpa calculated by CASPA is off my at least 0.4-0.5 points on the 4.0 scale. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/17/2020 at 2:29 PM, PA-Candidate said:

One question.....Is the calculated GPA with the Masters degree or just undergrad?

If Masters degree grades are there, then I would move on.  They will not look beyond that.

If 2.9 CASPA calculated only with undergrad, there may be hope.

Reading this it appears its with the masters degree - If so, I'd move on....

 

Sorry but truthful...

 

 

I believe it is calculated with everything I ever took. Undergrad gpa is 3.2, MS gpa is 3.7 and pharmacy school gpa is 3.4. My post-bacc gpa with 50 credit hours was 4.0. There is no way my gpa drops to 2.91. As I explained above, the way CASPA calculated my pharmacy gpa is what's causing the problem. Waiting on their response so we shall see. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More