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@nds1111 Sorry, I overlooked your last question. We would count your LMSW hours, but as you mentioned, not all programs do.

Hi! I have two questions. Do PA admissions programs expect to see students have a heavy science course load for several semesters? I know medical schools advise post-bacs to take at least three courses at the same time as an indicator of ability to manage this. As a post-bac I am considering leaving my job for full time school for a year, but if it is acceptable to admissions committees to take 2 courses per semester, I might reconsider for financial reasons. 

 

I also would like to know if my clinical experience as a social worker (LMSW) constitutes HCE for your program. Some programs accept this, while others do not. 

 

Thanks very much!

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Hi. I'm a high school senior going into university with the intention of eventually applying to pa school after undergrad. My question is in regards to the specific major I should pursue for my bachelors. I've heard that it does not really matter what you major in as long as it is still in some way relevant to ones desire to become a PA. Can anyone list some recommendations for potential majors? I'm having trouble finding anything interesting. Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

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I am new to this forum....well to forums in general so I apologize if this is not the right place to post this.  

 

My mother is a PA (graduated back in the early 80's)  

 

Would this information hurt me or help me in regards to applying to PA school? Or does it make no difference? 

 

  

 

 

 

 

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@paadmissions, thank you all for your time. I have a question about if I would be considered competitive for admission.

First, I'm an old man wink.gif I'm 44 with 24 years of Healthcare experience. Unfortunately I did slack off the first couple of years of college, so my GPA is a bit low (3.2 overall, 3.15 science), though there was a very strong upward trend in the grades. I obtained my Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science with a 3.5 average in that program, and have been certified for 22 years with ASCP. I also have a Master's Degree with a 3.9 GPA in the program. Experience is strong, with >20,000 patient contact hours and another 20,000 hours as a professional in healthcare. For the most part I've been there and done that in most of the direct patient care. GRE is 310. I am married and have two kids, but they are teenagers. 

My concerns are my age, lower undergraduate GPA and Science GPA. I plan on applying this cycle, but may well try to retake some of the courses I received a C in to raise that GPA. Is it a waste of time for this cycle or could I be competitive?

Thank you again for your time!

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@paadmissions

 

        I am applying to several programs and they are all accredidation-continued status. Most of their first-time PANCE rates are >= the national avg and they are mostly all June start dates. One in particular though, that is accredited, has first-time PANCE rates that are a bit below the national avg and this school has a start date in January, 5 months ahead of most of the other schools and the program length and cost is the same.

 

        I would get to start applying to PA jobs 5 months earlier and I would come out ahead financially, assuming it takes me the same amount of time to find a job after graduating from any school and make the same amount starting off as a new grad from any school (I think this is a decently justifiable assumption). This school with the slightly lower PANCE rates seems to have less strict admissions standards as their avg cumulative and science GPA is around 3.4 while the other schools are around 3.6.

 

        I am wondering if their lower PANCE rates are simply because of a slightly less studious student body or if it is because the program is lacking. I would like to attend this school as I would be able to start and finish 5 months earlier but am wanting to hear from others that may know if this information likely means that the program is lacking or if it simply is just because of a lower caliber student body. 

 

The school I am talking about is South University - Tampa

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@paadmissions

 

Hi, I'm new to this forum and need an advice.  I'm considering to apply to PA program this fall and my question is:

​I have 16 years of work experience as a medical doctor in a foreign country. Will that be considered clinical experience?

P.S. I'm getting my bachelor degree from the US college.

Thank you in advance

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Hi @paadmissions, another question if I may! I have my bachelors and masters but am taking pre reqs as a post bac. If I matriculate at my city college, my tuition is less expensive, and I get benefits like health insurance etc. this would mean I would apply as if I was getting a second bachelors but would then "drop out" after my reqs are done. I just want to ensure that this wouldn't be frowned upon by adcoms? It would be seen on the transcript I assume.

 

 

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@paadmissions,

 

I am preparing to submit my CASPA application at the end of this month. However, my sophomore year (Fall 2012) I received an academic irregularity ("plagiarism") on my internal college transcript. This came from a mass email that I sent out to my entire class trying to sell my personal notes to make cash. 

 
The professor received this email and called me in to meet the dean, where I received a plagiarism violation for putting and I quote directly from the email i received, "someone else's ideas (professor's) and facts in my own words (paraphrasing) without proper citation and is an academic irregularity, according to the College Honor Code."
 
My internal college transcript has an electronic notation of this irregularity. I've contacted the college to remove the irregularity and I am currently in the process of doing so, but i've also been told from the college that because this academic irregularity is in my internal college transcript, that any graduate school will not be able to see it when they receive my official transcripts. 
 
 
My question is this: Whether I get the academic irregularity removed from my internal transcript or not, should I use the appropriate space provided in my CASPA application to explain my academic irregularity? Would it help if I upload the email that states my academic regularity under "My documents" in CASPA? 
 
Thank you. 
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Obviously proving that you can handle a heavy workload is important because PA school is such a large workload. Traditionally I think proving this comes in the form of showing that you can balance school with other activities like work or volunteering, etc. But are there other ways to demonstrate this? Would taking an extra large class load and succeeding but not necessarily working, etc at the same time prove anything? What about working full time and taking a class? Or working full time and volunteering for what would be the equivalent of another part time job?

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@username_1 Thank you for your question. It is true that there is not a preference on what you major in for PA school. However, I usually recommend a biology or chemistry degree as those will usually help you cover the required prerequisite coursework for most programs within your planned curriculum. You'll find that if you major in something like psychology or business, for example, that you'll need to pick up additional courses outside of your major to meet the prerequisites for PA school (i.e. General Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, A&P, etc.). If you're able to complete the prereqs within your undergrad course of study, it will be helpful from a financial aid standpoint. Once you complete your bachelor's degree, you only qualify for student loans if you plan to take courses after you graduate, which is common for many applicants. Federal, possibly state grants, and university grants/scholarships are more accessible as an undergrad student. I hope this helps!

Hi. I'm a high school senior going into university with the intention of eventually applying to pa school after undergrad. My question is in regards to the specific major I should pursue for my bachelors. I've heard that it does not really matter what you major in as long as it is still in some way relevant to ones desire to become a PA. Can anyone list some recommendations for potential majors? I'm having trouble finding anything interesting. Any insight would be greatly appreciated.


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@lchapman83 Thank you for your question. I can't see how your mom being a PA would hurt your chances. If anything, her being a PA should be a good resource for you to understand the profession better and maybe she has recommendations on places to get your clinical hours. She's also "been there, done that" with PA school. She could provide great support as you go through PA school! I hope this helps!

I am new to this forum....well to forums in general so I apologize if this is not the right place to post this.  

 

My mother is a PA (graduated back in the early 80's)  

 

Would this information hurt me or help me in regards to applying to PA school? Or does it make no difference? 

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@rondaben Thank you for your question. Never think you're too old for PA school. Non-traditional students can bring a lot to the table. Your experience and GRE scores are good and the fact that you've completed a master's degree may be beneficial. What was your master's degree in? If you're going back to retake classes with a C make sure you're focusing on prerequisite courses first to ensure your prerequisite performance is strong. Also, if classes like A&P, Micro, Biochemistry, and Medical Terminology are older than 5 years I would recommend retakes in these classes. Its good prep for PA school. You may want to ensure you're application is currently strong before submitting an application. I usually recommend that applicants who are in-progress of making their apps more competitive finish or complete the majority of retakes before applying. Applying is a tedious and expensive process to go through. If you can avoid going through multiple cycles it will be helpful for you. I can always look over your transcripts if you'd like and make recommendations as if you're applying to our program. Scan and email them to me at jmish@methodist.edu if you want. Hope this helps!

@paadmissions, thank you all for your time. I have a question about if I would be considered competitive for admission.

First, I'm an old man wink.gif I'm 44 with 24 years of Healthcare experience. Unfortunately I did slack off the first couple of years of college, so my GPA is a bit low (3.2 overall, 3.15 science), though there was a very strong upward trend in the grades. I obtained my Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science with a 3.5 average in that program, and have been certified for 22 years with ASCP. I also have a Master's Degree with a 3.9 GPA in the program. Experience is strong, with >20,000 patient contact hours and another 20,000 hours as a professional in healthcare. For the most part I've been there and done that in most of the direct patient care. GRE is 310. I am married and have two kids, but they are teenagers. 

My concerns are my age, lower undergraduate GPA and Science GPA. I plan on applying this cycle, but may well try to retake some of the courses I received a C in to raise that GPA. Is it a waste of time for this cycle or could I be competitive?

Thank you again for your time!

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@physix37 Thank you for your questions. I did some quick research on South's program in Tampa and noticed the PANCE pass rates. I think the reasons may be multifaceted as to why the pass rates are lower, but the program would know better than me. If you are invited in for an interview, I would ask the program director his or her thoughts on why they feel the pass rates have only averaged 88% over the last 5 years.  I do think PANCE performance is important to consider when considering a program so make sure to ask the right questions of the program on your interview. Sorry, I can't help much with that question.   

@paadmissions

 

        I am applying to several programs and they are all accredidation-continued status. Most of their first-time PANCE rates are >= the national avg and they are mostly all June start dates. One in particular though, that is accredited, has first-time PANCE rates that are a bit below the national avg and this school has a start date in January, 5 months ahead of most of the other schools and the program length and cost is the same.

 

        I would get to start applying to PA jobs 5 months earlier and I would come out ahead financially, assuming it takes me the same amount of time to find a job after graduating from any school and make the same amount starting off as a new grad from any school (I think this is a decently justifiable assumption). This school with the slightly lower PANCE rates seems to have less strict admissions standards as their avg cumulative and science GPA is around 3.4 while the other schools are around 3.6.

 

        I am wondering if their lower PANCE rates are simply because of a slightly less studious student body or if it is because the program is lacking. I would like to attend this school as I would be able to start and finish 5 months earlier but am wanting to hear from others that may know if this information likely means that the program is lacking or if it simply is just because of a lower caliber student body. 

 

The school I am talking about is South University - Tampa

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@nagatino Thank you for your question. Our program counts foreign MD hours towards our clinical experience requirement.Be sure to check other programs' requirements before applying, but I'm assuming most programs will count them. I hope this is helpful. 

@paadmissions

 

Hi, I'm new to this forum and need an advice.  I'm considering to apply to PA program this fall and my question is:

​I have 16 years of work experience as a medical doctor in a foreign country. Will that be considered clinical experience?

P.S. I'm getting my bachelor degree from the US college.

Thank you in advance

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@nds1111 I don't think admissions committees would hold that against you since that's how the college operates. I think it would be obvious that you're taking post bacc classes. I wouldn't necessarily consider you a "drop out" if you've finished your prereqs and don't take additional classes. However, I'm pretty simple minded and other programs may look further in depth. Hope this helps. 

Hi @paadmissions, another question if I may! I have my bachelors and masters but am taking pre reqs as a post bac. If I matriculate at my city college, my tuition is less expensive, and I get benefits like health insurance etc. this would mean I would apply as if I was getting a second bachelors but would then "drop out" after my reqs are done. I just want to ensure that this wouldn't be frowned upon by adcoms? It would be seen on the transcript I assume.


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@purecoconut Thank you for your question. Ahhhh the world of ethics. Technically if it's not listed on your official transcript you should not have to report it. However, I would use this situation as a "teachable moment" that you could learn from. I know in our interviews we do ask questions that involve ethics. I would encourage you to reflect upon what you've learned from your mistake and how seriously a university and eventually a PA program takes violating an honor code. If you did something you felt was very small, imagine how that would be handled in a professional program. These types of actions, whether intentional or not, can sometimes result in a possible dismissal. If you choose to speak about it on your application, be sure to discuss, dispassionately,  only the facts, outcome and what you've learned from it. I hope this helps.

 

@paadmissions,

 

I am preparing to submit my CASPA application at the end of this month. However, my sophomore year (Fall 2012) I received an academic irregularity ("plagiarism") on my internal college transcript. This came from a mass email that I sent out to my entire class trying to sell my personal notes to make cash. 

 
The professor received this email and called me in to meet the dean, where I received a plagiarism violation for putting and I quote directly from the email i received, "someone else's ideas (professor's) and facts in my own words (paraphrasing) without proper citation and is an academic irregularity, according to the College Honor Code."
 
My internal college transcript has an electronic notation of this irregularity. I've contacted the college to remove the irregularity and I am currently in the process of doing so, but i've also been told from the college that because this academic irregularity is in my internal college transcript, that any graduate school will not be able to see it when they receive my official transcripts. 
 
 
My question is this: Whether I get the academic irregularity removed from my internal transcript or not, should I use the appropriate space provided in my CASPA application to explain my academic irregularity? Would it help if I upload the email that states my academic regularity under "My documents" in CASPA? 
 
Thank you. 

 

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@woodlingj Thank you for your question. I do think taking a heavy courseload and succeeding is a good way to prove to a committee that you're capable of handling the rigors of a program. However, there are some applicants who don't have the time to take a heavy course load. If that is the case, the applicant is encourage to take as many courses as possible. A lot of the times they also work while attempting to take these courses. If that is the case it shows time management from a different angle and if the applicant does well in the classroom, can show the same potential. I guess it all depends on your life style and what is the most feasible for you. Hope this helps. 

Obviously proving that you can handle a heavy workload is important because PA school is such a large workload. Traditionally I think proving this comes in the form of showing that you can balance school with other activities like work or volunteering, etc. But are there other ways to demonstrate this? Would taking an extra large class load and succeeding but not necessarily working, etc at the same time prove anything? What about working full time and taking a class? Or working full time and volunteering for what would be the equivalent of another part time job?

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@paadmissions,

 

I am preparing to submit my CASPA application at the end of this month. However, my sophomore year (Fall 2012) I received an academic irregularity ("plagiarism") on my internal college transcript. This came from a mass email that I sent out to my entire class trying to sell my personal notes to make cash. 

 
The professor received this email and called me in to meet the dean, where I received a plagiarism violation for putting and I quote directly from the email i received, "someone else's ideas (professor's) and facts in my own words (paraphrasing) without proper citation and is an academic irregularity, according to the College Honor Code."
 
My internal college transcript has an electronic notation of this irregularity. I've contacted the college to remove the irregularity and I am currently in the process of doing so, but i've also been told from the college that because this academic irregularity is in my internal college transcript, that any graduate school will not be able to see it when they receive my official transcripts. 
 
 
My question is this: Whether I get the academic irregularity removed from my internal transcript or not, should I use the appropriate space provided in my CASPA application to explain my academic irregularity? Would it help if I upload the email that states my academic regularity under "My documents" in CASPA? 
 
Thank you. 

 

Something similar happened to me in college. It was something only my school knew about and they said it would only be on my permanent file where grad schools could see if it happened a second time. I honestly forgot about it when I filed my CASPA last year and I got into 4 programs and no one mention it so I don't think they knew. I wouldn't state it because it is not necessary for them to know or it would be on your final transcript to them if it was. Hope this eases your mind. 

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Something similar happened to me in college. It was something only my school knew about and they said it would only be on my permanent file where grad schools could see if it happened a second time. I honestly forgot about it when I filed my CASPA last year and I got into 4 programs and no one mention it so I don't think they knew. I wouldn't state it because it is not necessary for them to know or it would be on your final transcript to them if it was. Hope this eases your mind. 

 

 

 I honestly forgot all about this incident until I saw the CASPA application asked if I had received an academic irregularity. I'm glad to hear that it worked out for you and very happy to finally speak to someone who has undergone a similar situation as I. Thank you for replying to me. 

 

@purecoconut Thank you for your question. Ahhhh the world of ethics. Technically if it's not listed on your official transcript you should not have to report it. However, I would use this situation as a "teachable moment" that you could learn from. I know in our interviews we do ask questions that involve ethics. I would encourage you to reflect upon what you've learned from your mistake and how seriously a university and eventually a PA program takes violating an honor code. If you did something you felt was very small, imagine how that would be handled in a professional program. These types of actions, whether intentional or not, can sometimes result in a possible dismissal. If you choose to speak about it on your application, be sure to discuss, dispassionately,  only the facts, outcome and what you've learned from it. I hope this helps.

 

Thank you for your response. It has helped me greatly in determining whether or not I write about my academic irregularity. 

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@nagatino Thank you for your question. Our program counts foreign MD hours towards our clinical experience requirement.Be sure to check other programs' requirements before applying, but I'm assuming most programs will count them. I hope this is helpful. 

Thank you very much. My other concern was if I would be labeled overqualified? 

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