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@unculturedpearl thank you for your question and sorry for the delay. The outstanding coursework will depend on the programs you're applying to and their deadlines for coursework completion and/or if they have a minimum number of courses that can be outstanding when you apply. I would THINK you would be ok if all other prerequisites are strong, but every program is different. That science/prerequisite GPA will need to be very strong 3.4-3.6 (sounds like you're almost there) to be competitive. Continue your shadowing hours and remember to spend quality time with the PAs in different fields, don't "hop" from PA to PA only spending 8 hours (for example). Hope this helps. 

Dear PA Admissions Director,

I'd first like to thank you for taking the time to give such great advice. I'm currently completing prereqs and would like to apply 2015-2016 cycle. At the time of submission, I would still have 3 classes to complete (Microbiology, Biochemistry and Biology II). I will be enrolled in those courses, Biology II - 3rd summer session and Microbiology & Biochem - Fall 2015. Will incomplete/in progress hurt my application?

In terms of the rest of my application, I have ~1000 HCE as a PT Aide, volunteer with the Medical Reserve Corps and will have 50-100 volunteer hrs with a community EMS squad (I'll also be working towards an EMT cert). My cumulative is 3.12 with ability to reach a 3.2 after prereqs are done and my science gpa is a 3.45 with potential to reach a 3.6.

My undergrad is in Health and Exercise Science.

I do not plan on taking the GRE as it isnt required for any of the programs I'm interested in. They also only require 200 HCE as minimum. I'll be shadowing an orthopedic PA for 2 days (10-16 hrs) and currently approaching OB/GYN and Oncology PAs and a Primary Care NP for shadowing opportunities.

Do I stand a chance?

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@hell1212 Thanks for your questions. I would research the programs you're interested in to check out the following:

- When outstanding courses have to be completed (at the time of application or by a certain date)

- Are your hours meeting the requirements for the program

- GPA and GRE averages, requirements or recommendations. If you are falling short in any of the GPAs or GRE scores (when you take them) you need to reevaluate if you should take more classes or if you need to retake the GRE. 

 

I open myself up to potential applicants emailing me transcripts and I provide honest feedback on whether or not they should apply this cycle or next. It wouldn't hurt to reach out to those programs to see if they could offer the same feedback. Hope this helps!

Dear paadmissions,

I want to thank you in advance for taking time to give me advice, it means so much!
I've recently made the decision to apply to PA school instead of medical school. I did not make this choice just because I "can't get in to med school". It wasn't an easy choice, but I know that becoming a PA is the right choice for me.

Below are my credentials:

My GPA:
First 2 years at community college: 2.7
Last 2 years at university: 3.79
Degree: B.S. Biological sciences

I've calculated a GPA just north of 3.2 when putting those grades together, and there is a notable strong, upward trend in my last 2 years with A's in genetics, biochemistry, functional genomics, and other demanding upper division courses at the university I attended.

HCE:
ER Scribe at medical scribe systems for 6 months (~700 paid hours as of now). I'm SURE you know what a scribe is but here it is anyway... I work with a PA or a physician each shift, and document the history of present illness, review of systems, physical examination, procedures, etc. I also get to see the medical decision making process from the time the patient is seen, to the time they are admitted or discharged. I'm starting to be able to predict what the doctor will order based on how the patient presents. This position has opened my eyes to how it is to work in the medical field and I've been able to see the difference between a doctor and a PA first hand. I don't think I want to work in an ER as PA, but this job has still given me great medical exposure and I continue to learn from it.

Volunteering:
I know this is bad, but I don't have volunteer experience and I am actively looking for a volunteer position in hospice care, or something similar.

GRE:
Have not taken it yet. Will only apply to schools that don't require it if I apply this cycle. Will take it if I apply in the future.

Prerequisite courses:
I will be taking the PA prerequisite courses that I am missing (microbiology, anatomy/physiology with lab, medical terminology) this upcoming summer. Does this already push me out of the upcoming cycle or does the application process allow us to apply with these courses in progress?

My questions-
If I apply for the 2015-16 cycle that opens in April do I even stand a chance of getting an acceptance? If not, should I apply later on in this cycle or wait until the beginning of the 2016 cycle?
I'm currently in my first gap year and am worrying about taking more gap years; I already feel like I am in limbo as it is! I am 22, if that matters!

 

Thank you again for reading my wall of text!

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@chelseacat 92 On paper it sounds like the academics are there. Make sure the hours will be competitive with the program you're considering. I don't think a mission trip is necessary as those types of trips are not as uncommon as once before. It's good experience and would encourage you to do it if you're interested in it, but I don't think it makes or breaks an application. Sometimes you can see just as much in a rural area of the US as overseas. I hope this is helpful and let me know if you have any further questions.

Hello, I found this post very helpful. I want to apply this summer (2015) to PA school. I really want to know my chances as this is (as cliché as it may sound) my dream career.

 

I graduated from Sacred Heart University in May 2014 with a 3.8 GPA and a B.S in Chemistry/Biochemistry. My Pre-Requisite GPA is 3.6, sciences only, and 3.67 with 3 Psychology courses added. I also received the Silver Medal of Excellence for Chemistry when I graduated.

 

I just began working this October (2014) as a paid EMT in Bridgeport, CT (urban). I am also a volunteer firefighter in Stamford, CT and I am beginning to pick up more volunteer hours there.  So far I have 300 hours of clinical experience, but expect to have at least 900-1000 by summer.

 

I have volunteered with a traveling hospice (150 hrs), Underprivileged Child Mentoring ( 1 semester, 65 hrs) , “Best Buddies” volunteer working with mentally disabled teens ( 1 semester, 50hrs), collecting money for a Toy drive with EMS (10 hrs), Working with Girl Scouts and a Domestic Violence Agency trough my sorority Kappa Delta ( minimum of 80hrs).  Total: 355

 

My practice GRE score without any prep was 302. I am still prepping and taking it in late March.

 

I really want to know if I would get an interview or get accepted with these credentials to enter a program in 2016. I do write well and I tend to be well composed in interview/ stressful situations.

Should I consider a Medical Mission trip, is this necessary?  My top choice school is Trevecca Nazerene, but I am applying to many others that I am very interested in as well.

Thank you to whoever wants to give advice or thoughts.

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Hello, paadmissions

 

I had actually recently made a thread concerning this, but I just realized that you would probably be more qualified than most other here to help with this question. With application season nearly upon us, I am looking to get all my ducks in a row in order to figure out where I should be applying to. The Microbiology course I took as a pre-req a couple years ago was a 3 credit upper-level course, without a lab as it isn't offered, at Stony Brook University, a program with a great reputation in sciences as well as a highly respected PA program, in which I recieved an A. Now that I am looking to apply to PA programs, I am seeing that many of the PA programs require a lab component for the course as part of their pre-req. Going forward with applications, is my only available course of action to retake an entire Microbiology course again before I apply, only this time with a lab? Or are there any places that I could take just a lab, or are there programs that have been known to work with circumstances such as these? If taking the full course again, would it be frowned upon or hurt my application to put that I intend to take the course over the summer or fall semester? Also, since its advised that applications be submitted early, and I wanted to have enough time to study for the GRE and for my references to write me LORs, what would you say would be the soft "deadline" for applying early as to have an advantage in admissions? I appreciate you taking your time to help.

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Hello,

 

To give you a bit of background: I am in my mid-twenties, went to IU for undergrad (business degree), am a CPA, have a masters degree in accounting, and have worked for a big 4 accounting firm for the past two years. During undergrad and graduate school I was at the top of my class and participated in various public service and academic research extracurriculars. I am now contemplating a career change and am thinking of pursuing a PA degree. I have not taken any science prerequisites, nor do I have any HCE hours. I am looking into programs at Duke, Emory, GWU, and the University of Washington. I know these programs are rather competitive, but would like your opinion on how they would view me as a "non traditional" applicant? Also, due to financial circumstances (mortgage, husband in graduate school, etc) I need to continue working while preparing for entry into a program. Thus, I will have to get my HCE hours part time (on the weekends) as my current job will provide us with the financial support to continue living. I also will likely take my prerequisite courses at a local community college. Since I have an undergraduate and graduate degree from a top public university, I think that admission committees will not discount the fact that I took my prerequisite courses at a community college, but would like your opinion on that as well.

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To paadmissions,

Hello. First of all, thank you for helping pre-pa students out.

 

This application cycle was my third attempt applying to pa school. Even though I had low overall GPA, from my postbacc grades i was able to get interview invites past 3 application cycles from at least one school. However, after the interview i only got rejection letters.

 

I definitely don't want to give up. And because I'm getting interview invites, i feel that i do have some chances to get accepted.

 

I wrote all the common interview questions down and my responses to practice, read the "how to ace the pa school interview" book, mock interviews at career center & with friends.

 

I'm unsure what to do now after 3 years of rejections after the interview.

Is it just my interview process? Or my overall low gpa might be the reason? What is the most important characteristic the admission committees look for from the interview? Any advice would be great.

 

Thank you.

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Hello there. Thank you so much for all of the useful information you have provided on this forum. I was asked for advice from a friend with regards to her PA application, and I looked through several pages of this discussion board and didn't see a similar one, so I thought I would ask....

 

She graduated with a bachelor of science degree with a 2.6 cumulative gpa. She has since raised it to a 2.8, by earning A's in a handful of science classes and by retaking classes she originally earned a C or less in. She has several years of quality HCE, and has been adding community service and shadowing to her repertoire. My recommendation to her was to continue taking post-bac science courses at a 4-year university until she has, at the very LEAST, reached the coveted 3.0 benchmark. Beyond that, she is looking at a few master's degree programs (science-related). After she has reached a 3.0 gpa (cum and science), would you recommend that she continue taking post-bac undergrad-level classes to raise the gpa even more, or would the master's program be more beneficial? Is it worth her time to complete a master's program when the ultimate goal is PA school?

 

Thank you so much. Your time and commitment to this forum is truly valued!

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@calad Thank you for your question. I would do some research on universities that offer a separate lecture and lab for Micro to see if you can take just the lab. For example, our university's Micro class is a 4 semester hour course. It's still a 3 s.h. lecture and 1 s.h. lab, but you can't take just the lab, if that makes sense. Does Stony Brook not offer just a lab portion that you can take? I would start there first to see if the department of Microbiology has any options for you and, if not, maybe the chair of the program could make recommendations of other nearby schools that offer just a lab. I don't think it would be looked down upon if you had to retake the course to get the lab...it's justified in my opinion. 

As far as when to apply early, that all depends on the deadline. If it's a fall deadline (October or November) I would encourage you to apply early if it's rolling admissions. It's a spring deadline, my opinion is that it would be ok to get your application in in the summer, but no later than mid-August. Remember, if you use a professor as a reference make sure to "nag" them prior to the end of the school year. They can sometimes be hard to reach after the school year ends. Hope this helps!

Hello, paadmissions

 

I had actually recently made a thread concerning this, but I just realized that you would probably be more qualified than most other here to help with this question. With application season nearly upon us, I am looking to get all my ducks in a row in order to figure out where I should be applying to. The Microbiology course I took as a pre-req a couple years ago was a 3 credit upper-level course, without a lab as it isn't offered, at Stony Brook University, a program with a great reputation in sciences as well as a highly respected PA program, in which I recieved an A. Now that I am looking to apply to PA programs, I am seeing that many of the PA programs require a lab component for the course as part of their pre-req. Going forward with applications, is my only available course of action to retake an entire Microbiology course again before I apply, only this time with a lab? Or are there any places that I could take just a lab, or are there programs that have been known to work with circumstances such as these? If taking the full course again, would it be frowned upon or hurt my application to put that I intend to take the course over the summer or fall semester? Also, since its advised that applications be submitted early, and I wanted to have enough time to study for the GRE and for my references to write me LORs, what would you say would be the soft "deadline" for applying early as to have an advantage in admissions? I appreciate you taking your time to help.

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@dmbl1306 Thank you for your questions. Where you take your science prerequisites will depend on the programs you're applying to. Some programs mention that preference on their website, maybe under a FAQ page, and there are some programs that don't have a preference of where courses are taken.  I personally feel upper level biology and chemistry courses should be taken at the university level, but if you have a strong academic background there may be a little more leniency, but never assume that. It doesn't hurt to contact the programs that interest you if you can't find that information on their website. If you end up taking the courses at the cc level, make sure to take them at the highest level (course number) possible.  Hope this helps!

Hello,

To give you a bit of background: I am in my mid-twenties, went to IU for undergrad (business degree), am a CPA, have a masters degree in accounting, and have worked for a big 4 accounting firm for the past two years. During undergrad and graduate school I was at the top of my class and participated in various public service and academic research extracurriculars. I am now contemplating a career change and am thinking of pursuing a PA degree. I have not taken any science prerequisites, nor do I have any HCE hours. I am looking into programs at Duke, Emory, GWU, and the University of Washington. I know these programs are rather competitive, but would like your opinion on how they would view me as a "non traditional" applicant? Also, due to financial circumstances (mortgage, husband in graduate school, etc) I need to continue working while preparing for entry into a program. Thus, I will have to get my HCE hours part time (on the weekends) as my current job will provide us with the financial support to continue living. I also will likely take my prerequisite courses at a local community college. Since I have an undergraduate and graduate degree from a top public university, I think that admission committees will not discount the fact that I took my prerequisite courses at a community college, but would like your opinion on that as well.

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@mamich Thank you for your questions. More than likely it is your interview since I'm assuming grades really aren't an issue (most of the time) if someone has received an interview. Below are tips I provide applicants with prior to their interview. Maybe this will help some:

 

The role of the interviewer is to get to know you and to help the committee select the best candidates from the pool of applicants that they invite for an interview. Looking at academic ability is only one factor. Remember that most applicants who are interviewed have very similar levels of academic accomplishments. They want to select the best fit for our university and program. During the interview they will consider the applicant’s strengths and weaknesses in areas that may include, but not limited to:

• Communication attributes

•Interpersonal skills 

•Interest in serving the needs of others 

•Maturity 

• Ability to relate to people

• Motivation for medicine 

• How one reacts to questions that are purposefully meant to “ruffle your feathers.” Do not take it personally. 

• Ability to handle stress 

• Realistic understanding of medicine and the PA profession

• Depth of extracurricular activities 

• Right fit for medicine and PA profession

• Right fit for the university

 

CONSEQUENCE OF A POOR INTERVIEW 

No matter how well qualified academically you may be, a poor interview definitely reduces your chance of receiving an acceptance. Many well-qualified candidates ruin their chances for acceptance by making poor impressions during the interview process. Although they have top grades, high GRE scores and quality experience, students who are not offered an acceptance:

• Are unable to appropriately articulate their goals 

• Fail to explain their fit for the University and program

• Cannot explain any obvious weaknesses in themselves or their application

• Do not sell their strengths

• Fail to demonstrate emotional maturity and common social skills 

• Fail to demonstrate a passion for medicine 

• Do not ask intelligent questions 

• Talk too much 

• Appeared bored or uninterested in the interview process and/or with program faculty and students 

• Show arrogance, not confidence 

• Text or talk on their cell phones during the interview day (hint: leave your phone in your car or purse)

• Letting interview questions affect one personally 

• Arrive late (hint: early is on time, on time is late)

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@michiganPrePA Thanks for your question. I would reevaluate where she stands with her prerequisite GPA to see if it's in a competitive range (3.4-3.6 in my opinion is competitive). If it's not in a competitive range I do recommend retakes in those classes before moving forward with pursing a master's degree before PA school. She may want to reach out to the programs that interest her to see if they feel she needs to focus on requirements and get the masters degree...or they feel she's ready to apply if she's retaken a lot of sciences. Hope this helps.

Hello there. Thank you so much for all of the useful information you have provided on this forum. I was asked for advice from a friend with regards to her PA application, and I looked through several pages of this discussion board and didn't see a similar one, so I thought I would ask....

 

She graduated with a bachelor of science degree with a 2.6 cumulative gpa. She has since raised it to a 2.8, by earning A's in a handful of science classes and by retaking classes she originally earned a C or less in. She has several years of quality HCE, and has been adding community service and shadowing to her repertoire. My recommendation to her was to continue taking post-bac science courses at a 4-year university until she has, at the very LEAST, reached the coveted 3.0 benchmark. Beyond that, she is looking at a few master's degree programs (science-related). After she has reached a 3.0 gpa (cum and science), would you recommend that she continue taking post-bac undergrad-level classes to raise the gpa even more, or would the master's program be more beneficial? Is it worth her time to complete a master's program when the ultimate goal is PA school?

 

Thank you so much. Your time and commitment to this forum is truly valued!

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Hello!

I am graduating in May with a degree in Biological Sciences. I did not apply this cycle (14-15) for PA programs because I have not obtained any hours yet. I am planning on taking an advanced EMT class that will begin in May and will be ending in the beginning of July. I was wondering if it would be smart to apply to schools when CASPA reopens for the (15-16) cycle, because I will not have many hours logged but all I plan on doing after EMT classes is working on getting my hours and shadowing. Or wait all the way to the (16-17) cycle to when I will actually have hours logged. I know that some of the schools I would like to apply to say that they do not require hours but its highly recommended. But then there are some schools that would like hours, but I am working on the hours during the application process, so could I still apply with them and then some how explain what I am doing, without them throwing out the application for seeing that I do not have my hours. 

Any help is greatly welcomed! 
Thank you!

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Hello! First off, thank you for devoting so much of your time to this forum, I really appreciate it!

I was wondering if you have any input as to whether most PA schools have a preference for the microbiology prerequisite. My school offers a Microbiology and Public health course along with  fundamental microbiology lab. Do you think this would this fulfill the requirement for most schools just as much?

 

Thank you so much for you time!

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Hi, 

 

I hope you're doing well and thank you for taking time out of your day and answering all of our questions. I am a recent graduate and graduated with a GPA of 3.0 in a business degree. However, I had a change of heart of what I want to do with my life and did not want to pursue a business anymore, but instead take the healthcare route and pursue PA school. I have taken a year off to work and take pre-requesites. My pre-req GPA is a 3.7 and my science GPA is 3.58. My GRE score is a 144 Verbal,145 Quantitative and 3.5 AW. I am a student athlete and have over 1000 hours as a CNA. I also have volunteer work in helping with the community. Mostly throughout undergrad I was not really focused or put any time towards my academics because I was so interested in my athletics and school came last. Fortunately, I decided sports was not what I wanted to do by the end of graduation and decided to take classes and achieve good grades in them to prove to schools I have what it takes to handle these classes and receive good grades as well. I would love any feedback you can give me. I plan to apply in April/May. What are my chances? I just need an interview and I know I can impress them.

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To paadmissions,

 

Hello and thank you for helping us pre-pa students.

 

I am currently 23 years old. I graduated with B.S s in Chemistry, Biochemistry, Economics last year and I had applied to the 2014-2015 cycle, but I was not accepted into any of the PA programs. My cumulative and science GPA is fairly low, a 3.1. I have finished all of the prereqs for most of the Schools that I want to apply to. I am also planning to take my GRE near the end of May. I am planning to apply in mid june in the 2015-2016 cycle. The past year I have spent racking up my direct patient care hours. By the time I apply, I will have a little over 2000 hours. Do you think it is wise for me to apply in this coming up cycle or should I wait off another year, or do you think I should apply to the 5 year BS/MS programs?

 

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@lmpushala Thank you for your patience and I apologize for the delay. Just yesterday I spoke with someone in the same type of situation and recommended that they wait one more cycle to get more hours before applying. The reason i say that is because I see a lot of programs requiring 1000+ hours of clinical experience. Many of the programs expect most applicants to have completed or even exceeded that minimum at the time of application or shortly there after. I think having a sufficient number of hours under your belt when you apply demonstrates to the committee that you've taken time to explore the medical field and the profession--you know what you're getting into. I find it hard for some applicants to "prove" that they know what they're getting into with minimal hours. So I would encourage you to wait a cycle as the application process is time consuming and expensive especially if you have  to have to go through the process again. Your application will be 10 times more competitive with more hours, should all other selection factors be met. I hope this helps!

Hello!

I am graduating in May with a degree in Biological Sciences. I did not apply this cycle (14-15) for PA programs because I have not obtained any hours yet. I am planning on taking an advanced EMT class that will begin in May and will be ending in the beginning of July. I was wondering if it would be smart to apply to schools when CASPA reopens for the (15-16) cycle, because I will not have many hours logged but all I plan on doing after EMT classes is working on getting my hours and shadowing. Or wait all the way to the (16-17) cycle to when I will actually have hours logged. I know that some of the schools I would like to apply to say that they do not require hours but its highly recommended. But then there are some schools that would like hours, but I am working on the hours during the application process, so could I still apply with them and then some how explain what I am doing, without them throwing out the application for seeing that I do not have my hours. 

Any help is greatly welcomed! 
Thank you!

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@Nia26 Thank you for your patience and sorry for the delay. If you were applying to our program I would prefer to see an applicant take a General Microbiology course if given the option. If you have no other option but the public health micro run the course description by the programs you're applying to to make sure it will count before you sign up for the class. Hope this helps!

 

Hello! First off, thank you for devoting so much of your time to this forum, I really appreciate it!

I was wondering if you have any input as to whether most PA schools have a preference for the microbiology prerequisite. My school offers a Microbiology and Public health course along with  fundamental microbiology lab. Do you think this would this fulfill the requirement for most schools just as much?

 

Thank you so much for you time!

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@PAForum2014 Thank you for your questions. It sounds as if you've done a lot of improving in your post bacc work versus your undergrad performance. I would recommend a retake of the GRE to be more competitive and to "support" your recent performance in the sciences. Our program recommends a 297 or higher (V&Q combination) to be competitive. I don't think many programs hold it against the applicant if he/she takes the GRE more than once so it's worth another try in my opinion. Other factors that might be considered is where you took your prerequisites, how many hours you took at one time, and if you have any outstanding courses still left to take. These are things we look at so it may not be applicable to every program. Hope this helps.

Hi, 

 

I hope you're doing well and thank you for taking time out of your day and answering all of our questions. I am a recent graduate and graduated with a GPA of 3.0 in a business degree. However, I had a change of heart of what I want to do with my life and did not want to pursue a business anymore, but instead take the healthcare route and pursue PA school. I have taken a year off to work and take pre-requesites. My pre-req GPA is a 3.7 and my science GPA is 3.58. My GRE score is a 144 Verbal,145 Quantitative and 3.5 AW. I am a student athlete and have over 1000 hours as a CNA. I also have volunteer work in helping with the community. Mostly throughout undergrad I was not really focused or put any time towards my academics because I was so interested in my athletics and school came last. Fortunately, I decided sports was not what I wanted to do by the end of graduation and decided to take classes and achieve good grades in them to prove to schools I have what it takes to handle these classes and receive good grades as well. I would love any feedback you can give me. I plan to apply in April/May. What are my chances? I just need an interview and I know I can impress them.

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@grish0492 Thank you for your question. Before you reapply, reach out to the programs that you applied to and seek feedback regarding your application. I'm taking a guess that if your GPA is a 3.1 there may be some improvements that need to be made in classroom (in particular the prerequisite courses). Also, if you applied to programs that required the GRE and did not submit scores, they can't make any further decisions without them. Some programs are willing to give feedback for improvements so be sure to seek it before going through the process again. If you have to do some work on your GPA you need to take a cycle off and make those improvements before moving forward with resubmitting your application. Hope this helps!

To paadmissions,

 

Hello and thank you for helping us pre-pa students.

 

I am currently 23 years old. I graduated with B.S s in Chemistry, Biochemistry, Economics last year and I had applied to the 2014-2015 cycle, but I was not accepted into any of the PA programs. My cumulative and science GPA is fairly low, a 3.1. I have finished all of the prereqs for most of the Schools that I want to apply to. I am also planning to take my GRE near the end of May. I am planning to apply in mid june in the 2015-2016 cycle. The past year I have spent racking up my direct patient care hours. By the time I apply, I will have a little over 2000 hours. Do you think it is wise for me to apply in this coming up cycle or should I wait off another year, or do you think I should apply to the 5 year BS/MS programs?

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Sorry to bother you just a little more info and one more question. I took the pre-reqs at a well known and highly looked at university where I did my undergrad. In fall and spring I took between 8-13 hours. So about 3-4 classes a semester including labs. Also, do you think if I did not choose to retake the GRE it would be detrimental to me getting accepted or getting an interview?

 

Thanks again!

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HI PA Admissions Director, 

 

Thanks for helping out with all of our questions!


I have a low science GPA - 3.2 - and am wondering if it is a good idea to take two more biology courses to get me up to a 3.3 - is it THAT big of a difference? I would have to take genetics (I got a B the first time) and an upper level bio at a university. Problem is, I can't really afford to pay the tuition for these classes and work full time as a nursing assistant. Should I go for the A's in those courses and get the 3.3 - or focus on other parts of my application?

 

 

Thanks so much. 

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Hello,

 

So I'm actually looking to apply to Methodist and other NC schools this coming cycle. However, I am nervous overall about my chances and want to know what I can do to maximize my chances. 

 

Academics:

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition from North Carolina State University (graduated fall of 2014)

CASPA overall gpa: 3.28

CASPA science gpa: 3.54

Dean's List Last Four Semesters: 2013 Spring, 2013 Fall, 2014 Spring, 2014 Fall 

-I did have a rough start to school, but I definitely feel that I finished strong after I switched my intended major from business to nutrition. My major GPA was 3.78.

 

GRE:

Verbal: 166 (96th percentile)

Quantitative: 161 (80th percentile)

Analytical Writing: 5.0 (93rd percentile)

 

Health Care Experience:

Certified Pharmacy Technician: 1,200 hours (this will continue to go up ~35 hours per week)

Internship under a Registered Dietician working with cardiac rehabilitation patients at local hospital: 60+ hours (this will continue to grow 5~10 hours per week)

I'm halfway through a CNA class at my local CC and will be trying to work full time ASAP upon completion (and continue pharmacy tech position)

 

Shadowing

None. I'm in the process of trying to find some shadowing opportunities. I was going to shoot for roughly ~50 hours of volunteer time.

 

 

My concerns are really with my GPA and my HCE. I'm worried about my GPA, but I'm hoping that the strong upswing and ~3.7 gpa for my last two years will make up for it (is this something PA schools look at?) I know my healthcare experience isn't the best, so that's why I'm taking the CNA class. I hope I will be able to add 1k CNA hours to my application this cycle, since I should have that by years' end. The shadowing has me somewhat concerned as well, but I'm going to really dig deep and reach out over the next few weeks to find some opportunities. I guess my overall question is whether I stand a fair chance of acceptance to PA school this cycle, and what can I do in the short term to maximize my chances? 

 

 

Thank you so much for creating this thread. My ideal school is Campbell, but the admissions counselor there didn't really give me any specific advice except to say he thinks I'm an excellent candidate and to apply early. 

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HELP!!!

 

I am planning to apply to PA Programs in 2016 for program start date of Fall 2017.

 

I am bit of a non-traditional student in that I completed my BS in 2009, completed a Master's in Biomedical Sciences in 2012 and have been working as a Procurement Transplant Coordinator since 2012. I work directly under a physician in critical care/OR setting. 

 

Since most programs have an expiration date on course work I am finding myself having to retake a few courses prior to applying. My question is (I understand this might sound pretty weird), for classes I took in Fall 2007 will they be within the 10 year time frame for a PA program that start in Fall 2017???

 

This might be a remedial question but it makes a significant difference in the courses that I will retake vs. coursework that will meet the requirement. I did reach out to the local university for guidance but I understand that they get overwhelmed with questions and haven't had an opportunity to respond. 

 

If anyone has ANY insight on this matter I would greatly appreciate your feedback!!

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Hello, I am a recent graduate and work as a medical assistant. By this May I will have roughly 2000 clinical hours, I have shadowed many doctors as well as volunteered at a hospital gaining over 200+ hours. My GPA is low, a 3.3. I had some troubles with my upper level biology classes. I just took the GRE today and got a 154Q and 147V. What are my chances. I know that is a horrible question to ask but I am just worried. Thank you

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Hi paadmissions,

 

As always, your advice and guidance is always appreciated. To give you some background I applied to a handful of schools during the 2014-2015 cycle and receieved 2 acceptances and 2 waitlist offers. When I began the application process last cycle, my husband and I sat down and agreed upon each school and its geographic location. He was flexible with relocating since his finished his Master's in December and was ready for a position that utilized his new degree. He began applying to positions in the vicinity of each of the schools I was scheduled for interviews.

 

After 6 months of applying with no luck, he received an interview for his dream job in a town where I received a last minute interview invite and was offered the position in less than a week- only a couple of days after my interview. To make a long story short, I received a spot on the school's waitlist. We decided it would be best for him to accept the position, and hopefully, I would get into the program. I also received an acceptance offer from a school that I also equally like about 4.5 hours aways. The initial plan was to attend the program that was 4.5 hours away, which is also about $50,000 more expensive so he was able to keep his dream job, but now I am having second thoughts about living apart and was hoping you could provide me with some incite.

 

I was hoping to ask your opinion about declining an acceptance this cycle to reapply next month for the 2015-2016 cycle. I know there is still a chance I could obtain a spot in the program from the waitlist, but I don't want to count on it. As a program director, what is your opinion on an applicant who was waitlisted on a cycle, continued to develop and grow (more HCE, additional science classes, volunteer hours, etc) since the last cycle, but declined an acceptance offcer at another program during a previous cycle.

 

Thank you for you time!

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