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Lesser known PA program or prestigious NP program?

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Hi everyone,

I wanted to get insight into this topic and I realize posting in this forum may be a bit biased but I’m currently deciding between a PA and NP program. The PA program is in Knoxville, 2 years and about $90k in tuition. The direct entry NP program is in Boston, 3 years and about $130k in tuition. These are not including the cost of living and rent. I’m faced with a tough decision because everything I’ve read points to NP and PA having a similar scope of practice. The NP school is at a world renowned program with excellent clinical rotations and I would be part of the inaugural class at the PA program, not well known at all. Does the reputation of the program matter when it comes to patient credibility and job search? Is it worth the additional year and higher tuition/cost of living? Thanks! 

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When you enter the workforce as a PA or NP no one will care much from where you received your degree, your credentials and reputation are what employers care about. Here is a list of pros and cons:

Cost(COL and tuition) Knoxville > Boston

Autonomy NP > PA (NP can practice outside of the scope of a supervising physician)

Time to complete PA > NP

Confidence in program Boston > Knoxville

Thats about all the information you gave us, no on here can tell you what the right choice is for your individual circumstances. But you are right we are biased, chose PA.

 

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1 hour ago, DomRRTtoPA said:

When you enter the workforce as a PA or NP no one will care much from where you received your degree, your credentials and reputation are what employers care about. Here is a list of pros and cons:

Cost(COL and tuition) Knoxville > Boston

Autonomy NP > PA (NP can practice outside of the scope of a supervising physician)

Time to complete PA > NP

Confidence in program Boston > Knoxville

Thats about all the information you gave us, no on here can tell you what the right choice is for your individual circumstances. But you are right we are biased, chose PA.

 

I would say the scope of a PA>NP scope. They often have to get more certs to practice in new areas outside there specialty, can’t assist in surgery without an RNFA certs, Most don’t have any procedural training in school. 
 

anyways, I’ve already answered this question on reddit. Same answers applies. I’ll post for others.

What inaugural program? South college has been there, UT started a few years back, LMU is opening a new program there, but they have a program in Harrogate already you can look at board scores for. 

As an RN who did some MSN before I went PA, you’ll get a better clinical education at the Pa program. No one will give you a job based on where you went to school, I can guarantee that. But really what seals the deal is the cost. Go to Knoxville where you can live cheap and have a less expensive schooling.

I imagine this NP school is not for prior RNs or it wouldn’t be so expensive.

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Coming from a financial aspect....the PA program will be cheaper and lesser in length. 

The longer you're in school, the less ($) income you make in return. 

...Some nursing schools are highly funded and can offer amazing scholarship packages. My BSN Program was originally 47K....but I paid 27K. The neighboring PA school doesn't have any scholarship for students.

Pay your deposit for both programs so you're guaranteed a spot. Then compare the financial packages and see which one is cheaper in the long run. 

 

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The program name can definitely open some doors for the first job (and the market is tough for new grads in some markets), but after that it won't matter. I went to a "name" school and don't think it was worth the extra money as long as you will have guaranteed access to quality rotations. I have several friends in smaller or "lesser known" PA programs who had issues with the rotations available to them; obviously a lot of that is personal preference, but it's something to look into.

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