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I’ve been a PA now for 6.5 years and have had a few jobs in that time and with each my salary increased. Now I am in a salary range I am happy with but I am looking for an new job to get out of a crappy work environment. It seems like no one wants to pay PAs a decent salary anymore and the PAs who are more experience are getting screwed out of jobs because there are PAs that will take less, especially a place like where I live which is saturated. One position I applied for, as part of the screening process Before an interview they asked my salary requirements and when I told them what I am making and I don’t want to go lower they write back, “we are impressed by your experience and qualifications but are Unable to offer you a position at this time”. It’s like employers Are cheap just don’t want pay PAs what we are worth. I guess this is more of a vent than anything but it’s just not fair. 

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this is why new grads need to be very careful at what they take

 

 

The rules of threes does apply here....

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4 hours ago, ThisIsIt said:

I’ve been a PA now for 6.5 years and have had a few jobs in that time and with each my salary increased. Now I am in a salary range I am happy with but I am looking for an new job to get out of a crappy work environment. It seems like no one wants to pay PAs a decent salary anymore and the PAs who are more experience are getting screwed out of jobs because there are PAs that will take less, especially a place like where I live which is saturated. One position I applied for, as part of the screening process Before an interview they asked my salary requirements and when I told them what I am making and I don’t want to go lower they write back, “we are impressed by your experience and qualifications but are Unable to offer you a position at this time”. It’s like employers Are cheap just don’t want pay PAs what we are worth. I guess this is more of a vent than anything but it’s just not fair. 

I'm sorry you're in a crappy work environment. It seems like some high-paying positions have to pay to get people because of that reason. And similarly with low-paying positions: it's a crappy work environment so turnover is huge and therefore they won't pay  people. 

I'm not sure this will help since you're looking more to vent, but I figured I'd share:

I've learned to "never say the number first" and "everything is negotiable." Sticking to that, I think it's worked out for me so far throughout my yearly negotiations and jobs. Sometimes they pin you down and you need to finally say something, the jobs have set raises, and the larger institutions are sometimes harder to negotiate with. But in my opinion, it never hurts to have a reasonable discussion about it.

As for the screening process, I try to never say anything about salary if at all possible because you can shoot yourself in the foot before even getting in the door in two ways: filter yourself out by being too high or automatically pin yourself to a lower range by aiming too low. My answer would be something like, "Once I hear more about the specifics of the position, I would have a better gauge on the salary." And if they offer a salary range during the screening call that's not really up to snuff, I wouldn't necessarily say no right then either. I would hear them out and interview. And if I was happy, I'd see if they be willing to negotiate. They might be if they decide they like me enough to come up on their offer. But that can't happen unless you get into the door first. 

And I agree with Ventana about the rule of three's of which you get to pick two during your job search: location, specialty, and pay. Rural positions may pay more and afford you the increase you're looking for but if you're limited to a location and specialty, it may be difficult to find the pay you're looking for. That's not to say the trifecta unicorn isn't out there, because it just might be, but it may be extremely difficult to find. I'd encourage you to open up your search parameters and keep looking for something that will get you out of that situation. You could also consider moving to a lower COL area which would help offset some of the pay difference. 

With all that said, there may be a glass ceiling for PAs for both practice ability and pay. But you could continue to increase your earnings if you choose to switch to a higher paying specialty or do PRN work on the side.

Good luck!

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I had to take a lower base salary to move to my desired location and preferred specialty but get a bonus based on productivity. With my bonus I make a good living and make more than my last job. Can you negotiate for productivity bonus in the job you are applying for? Admittedly it is a bit of a risk relying on a bonus to make what you deserve. 

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On 2/8/2020 at 4:51 AM, ThisIsIt said:

I Now I am in a salary range I am happy with but I am looking for an new job to get out of a crappy work environment. It seems like no one wants to pay PAs a decent salary anymore and the PAs who are more experience are getting screwed out of jobs because there are PAs that will take less, especially a place like where I live which is saturated. 

A result of the market saturation in some areas, and of NPs who are willing to work for ridiculously low salaries.

I agree with Sed; try not to be the first to mention salary when talking with a potential employer.  32 years of experience here.  I live in a rural area, but drive 75 miles one way to work.  I don't work too hard, and I make what I consider a pretty good salary, but I was able to offer the employer a background and skill set that they wanted and needed.  I could work closer to home, but wouldn't make near as much, or would have to work a lot more hours to do so.  It's always a balancing act.

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