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Hello, 

I have been working in family med the past few months as a PA and am looking for opinions from switching from family med to hospitalists? what are opinions on switching jobs? Stress load of hospitalist position vs family med? 

 

thanks !! 

Edited by AC2662
Wrong title

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Well, as hospitalists we deal with the dramatic fall-out from patients who don't listen to their outpatient family medicine providers, so this would likely not be an improvement for you. Tired of arguing about A1C? Now the patient's in with HHS and you still get to argue about that full sugar soda and fries. You still get to argue about insulin.

If you're straight hospitalist you probably won't deal with many children, so that might be a step up for you. I also spend much more than 15 minutes with my patients. Sometimes hours.

Antibiotic arguments happen everywhere. In the hospital, we often get patients who've been started on something empirically in the ED and we have to take it away. What's worse than refusing to give antibiotics? Trying to take them away once "that other doctor said I had an infection!"

I LOVE my job. You should just know that the things you hate about outpatient family medicine are still big problems in hospitalized populations.

Have you considered a specialty?

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