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Peds Sports Medicine Conference - Bay Area

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I wanted to share a conference that I'm helping plan in January 2020: Pediatric Sports Medicine Conference: Managing Pain in Your Young Athletes After Injuries. I attended last year and really enjoyed the content. It sold out last year, so if you're interested in attending, be sure to register before the end of Dec.

UCSF Benioff Sports Medicine faculty will present evidence-based management of acute and chronic pain, including the roles of ice, splints and braces, pain medication, cognitive behavioral therapy and physical therapy.

By the end of this conference, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the early signs and symptoms of pain amplification syndrome and chronic regional pain syndrome that could occur after injury
     
  • Apply appropriate pain management strategies for young athletes, including ice and other modalities, pain medication, cognitive behavioral therapy, and physical therapy
     
  • Discuss the red ‑ flags of pediatric musculoskeletal injuries, including when to get X-rays and when to refer
     
  • Describe the proper prescription and ­ fitting of upper- and lower extremity splints, including their duration of use depending on injury diagnosis
     
  • Explain the steps needed for proper evaluation and management of concussions to avoid persistent post-concussion symptoms, including chronic headache pain
     
  • Identify rheumatological causes of joint and back pain in pediatric patients

Here is the link for more information or to register: https://ucsfbch.regfox.com/2020-pediatric-sports-medicine-conference 

 

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