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What to review before my program starts?

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Hello all! 

I am currently accepted into a school that starts in January but I hope to start in May with my top school choice! I have been a CNA but just started a position at a scribe with primary care and ED, where I think I’ll learn so much each day.

I have heard to review a&p and also medical terminology before starting. I am really eager to learn in general and also try to gain knowledge to make the start of PA school “less daunting” in regards to a&p. 

Any tips are greatly appreciated! 

 

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I second enjoying the time you have with family and friends while you can. SERIOUSLY!

PS- Travel as much as you can now. I did a few trips before school started.

Edited by JD2012

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How far out of school are you?  Are you used to carrying 21+ hour courseloads with lab sciences?  If so, you may be fine.  If you've not worked that hard on JUST school in a while, you might want to ignore the "take it easy" advice and begin honing your study skills back up.  WHAT you study isn't that important; A&P is a good a thing as any.  What's more important is that you can spend 30-40 hours per week sitting in class doing death by powerpoint AND then spend 20-30 MORE hours studying outside of class.  Each week.  For ~15 months.

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Medical terminology is huge. I think being a scribe right before PA school is going to help you immensely, really wish I did the same. Pay attention to how/when the provider is ordering labs, imaging, consults etc. Knowing how to write an HPI will also be a huge advantage. Also, depending on your program I would review my basic systems physiology as well. 

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9 hours ago, Endeavor said:

Medical terminology is huge. I think being a scribe right before PA school is going to help you immensely, really wish I did the same. Pay attention to how/when the provider is ordering labs, imaging, consults etc. Knowing how to write an HPI will also be a huge advantage. Also, depending on your program I would review my basic systems physiology as well. 

Yes being a scribe so far has been extremely useful in aspect school might not be as detailed on.

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10 hours ago, rev ronin said:

How far out of school are you?  Are you used to carrying 21+ hour courseloads with lab sciences?  If so, you may be fine.  If you've not worked that hard on JUST school in a while, you might want to ignore the "take it easy" advice and begin honing your study skills back up.  WHAT you study isn't that important; A&P is a good a thing as any.  What's more important is that you can spend 30-40 hours per week sitting in class doing death by powerpoint AND then spend 20-30 MORE hours studying outside of class.  Each week.  For ~15 months.

I just graduated in May! I think I’m pretty used to heavy course loads. I’m the kind of person to want to study in advance just because I want to and  am motivated to.. I actually just got Netters coloring book which seems like it’ll be a great study guide for touching up on terms and recalling structures! 

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Netters is great. I spent $ on the atlas and it was 10x more useful than the books / PPs we got in school. Great advice above, my only addition is eat healthy, sleep a lot, and get in shape the best you can before school, because once you start drinking from the fire hose you'll be surprised how often you forget to eat / sleep or binge on the fastest thing you can find around.

Edited by EastCoastPA

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On 9/26/2019 at 10:06 PM, rev ronin said:

How far out of school are you?  Are you used to carrying 21+ hour courseloads with lab sciences?  If so, you may be fine.  If you've not worked that hard on JUST school in a while, you might want to ignore the "take it easy" advice and begin honing your study skills back up.  WHAT you study isn't that important; A&P is a good a thing as any.  What's more important is that you can spend 30-40 hours per week sitting in class doing death by powerpoint AND then spend 20-30 MORE hours studying outside of class.  Each week.  For ~15 months.

I'm gonna piggy back off rev. Develop your study habits. You are about to be bombarded with information and you need to retain all the important details in a relatively short period of time. Every single PA-S in my cohort struggled with the studying aspect to some degree. if you can develop a good habit now, it will help when you start. I highly suggest the audiobook, "Make it Stick" by Peter Brown. He goes over different studying techniques. I was really reluctant to listen to a book prior to starting, but man did this book really help me UNDERSTAND studying and gave me new ways to approach the PA grad school work load. Hope this helps and good luck!

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